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Old 01-07-2009, 10:27 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by Danielle_Eddings View Post
A I think my next piece will be an enamal dutch oven.

excellent idea danielle. the enameled ovens are really excellent for saucy sticky or acidic dishes. You will enjoy it. I use my raw CI for roasts and chickens etc and my enameled for things like tomato sauce. chili. risotto.

On the Lodge preseasoned... I was looking at them at the restaurant supply store. They seem OK. I do understand the pre-seasoning thing so people are not so intimidated. The lodge surface was decent and the preseasoning looked like a decent start.... I wouldnt fry and egg in it right away. They had another no name brand also "pre-seasoned" that looked positively dreadful.

The large preseasoned large were not cheap though... for less money and a bit of elbow grease you can do better for your $$ buying vintage on ebay. For people who like new stuff I think Lodge is the only viable choice. Whle I dont like them as much as my older pans they seem decent
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:00 PM   #42
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I just used a coarse disc in a random orbit sander, probably 80 grit. Followed with a finer grit. I was doing a double burner grill, so did not have the sides to contend with. A more flexible method, such as a body grinder, would work better with sided pieces. As metals go, CI is fairly soft, and most any coarse grit would work. Important thing is to keep it flat. Hills and valleys would only make things worse. This is not as good as old CI, but way better than new Lodge. Point is, shouldn't have to do this.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:10 PM   #43
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I was wondering if a body shop could grind 'em off, but it hardly seems worth the trouble. I have several old ones that that have nice smooth seasoning on them--maybe I will just hang the new one on the wall for decoration.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:42 PM   #44
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A machine shop could grind them flat for you, not sure if a body shop would. However, for the investment in time and money, you could probably do better checking flea markets, semi-antique stores, and yard and garage sales, and buy old ones.
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Old 01-07-2009, 02:43 PM   #45
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A machine shop could grind them flat for you, not sure if a body shop would. However, for the investment in time and money, you could probably do better checking flea markets, semi-antique stores, and yard and garage sales, and buy old ones.
But isn't nice to have a bit of roughness on the CI skillet?
If it's smoothened down, would it be any different than a non still pan, other than the teflon part?
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Old 01-07-2009, 02:45 PM   #46
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Any one have a signature dish that they make on their CI? A dish that wouldn't be the same cooked in a different pan?

Also, what type of steak would you fry and what sauce would you make using the CI?
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Old 01-07-2009, 03:18 PM   #47
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But isn't nice to have a bit of roughness on the CI skillet?
If it's smoothened down, would it be any different than a non still pan, other than the teflon part?
Roughness good in CI? I don't think so. Cast iron is non stick because it is smooth and greasy. Comparing a well seasoned cast iron pan to non-stick is not possible. Cast iron holds heat on all sides, even heat that would melt the teflon, does not wear out, and can go directly into the oven. Not so with teflon.
As for signature dishes. Ham-beans with cornbread. Steaks I use choice or better ribeye or strip, sear smoking hot, and finish in the oven. 1.25 or better thick. A fairly quick sauce I make is made with cream, romano or parmesan cheese, and reconstituted mushrooms. pepper, garlic a scosh of sherry, other herbs. Works well on pork chops too.
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Old 01-07-2009, 03:33 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by DOM1183
Any one have a signature dish that they make on their CI? A dish that wouldn't be the same cooked in a different pan?
Cornbread

Quote:
Originally Posted by DOM1183
Also, what type of steak would you fry and what sauce would you make using the CI?
Whatever type you like, and can afford. --- I'll pass on the sauce.
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Old 01-07-2009, 03:47 PM   #49
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[quote=Bigjim68;765645]Roughness good in CI? I don't think so. Cast iron is non stick because it is smooth and greasy. quote]

My CI is also non stick and still rough compared to a smooth non CI pan. I think it's non stick because of the seasoning (grease) and not because it's got a smooth surface. A s/s pan is really smooth but certain foods will stick like crazy if there is no lub (grease).

I don't know, if sanding down the CI helps then that's great. I personally don't think it's necessary if you have a good seasoned coat on it.
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Old 01-07-2009, 03:58 PM   #50
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I don't know, if sanding down the CI helps then that's great. I personally don't think it's necessary if you have a good seasoned coat on it.
The smoother the CI the more prized it is. Smoothness is a great thing in CI. It is much easier to get a good seasoning on a smooth CI pan than on a rough one.
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