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Old 01-07-2008, 11:06 PM   #1
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New to Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron

Well i bought a few Lodge pre-seasoned cast iron skillets and they arrived today.

Ive read a ton about them and still I have questions.

I used a 8" skillet and some chopped beef to test. Out of the package I first rinsed the skillet then put it on the stove with a medium heat. I put in the chopped beef and it was clearly sticking. Since that was happening I poured a little olive oil in the pan and that solved the problem.

Here are my questions.

Since it is pre-seasoned I thought the food should not stick but I guess I need to cook more on the skillet before food will stop sticking?

Second question, I am supposed to use paper towels but when i cleaned the pan after the cook (with hot water, salt and a brush), some particles from the paper towel stuck to the pan. Should I not use paper towels? or if I keep using paper towels can I just rinse off those paper towel particles when I use the pan the next time?

Third question, I used Pam before putting the meat on and used it again after cleaning and the skillet cooled down, then wiped off the excess with a paper towel. Would mazola corn oil work better instead of Pam? Or should I use vegetable oil like the instructions recommended? Ive read so much about cast iron where I get confused because some contradictory things are said like not using soap etc.

Maybe use lard instead of Pam and any other type of oil?

Sorry for the long post but this is my first try with cast iron.

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Old 01-07-2008, 11:13 PM   #2
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1. Pre-seasoned cast iron still requires some use to achieve optimum performance.
2. I dry my cast iron with a cloth towel and use paper towels to oil them.
3. I use cooking oil when storing my cast iron.
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:15 PM   #3
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The initial seasoning will not make the pan non stick. That will come with time and fat. They more you use the pan the more non stick it will become.

The more you use the pan the stronger the seasoning will become. As that happens, the surface will become smoother so it will not shred your paper towels like it is doing now. Until then you can just rinse those little bits out next time you use the pan like you suggested.

I would not use Pam. I would use oil or lard or other forms of fat depending on what you are cooking. Fat is your friend with cast iron.

As for soap, it can be used, but only once you have a very strong seasoning.
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:21 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
The initial seasoning will not make the pan non stick. That will come with time and fat. They more you use the pan the more non stick it will become.

The more you use the pan the stronger the seasoning will become. As that happens, the surface will become smoother so it will not shred your paper towels like it is doing now. Until then you can just rinse those little bits out next time you use the pan like you suggested.

I would not use Pam. I would use oil or lard or other forms of fat depending on what you are cooking. Fat is your friend with cast iron.

As for soap, it can be used, but only once you have a very strong seasoning.
I wholly endorse what GB has said. I have no experience with "new" pieces. My cast iron cookware is very old, some of it at least 100-years-old. As a result, they've been seasoned sooooo well that they make today's Teflon cookware weep. I love my well-seasoned cast iron and I wouldn't trade it for anything. Just be patient and use, use, use.
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:23 PM   #5
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Welcome to the club. As the others said, the factory seasoning will require some use to really set the seasoning. Try cooking some things like sausage and bacon in it at first to deposit a lot of fat in it. Also, I've had good results with pouring in just enough olive oil to coat the bottom and then heating the oil while I cut up some taters. I then put the taters in the oil and toss them somewhat and put the skillet in the oven at 375 or so and bake the taters. You can use the broiler to brown them up some when they are done to your liking. This helps put some fat from the oil onto the skillet, and the heat of the cook helps to carbonize the fats, thus seasoning the skillet.
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:26 PM   #6
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thanks for the quick responses.

The pan came with instructions stuck to the skillet with glue.
I rinsed the skillet with water, poured out water and let the remaining water evaporate while the skillet was being warmed. then i put the meat on to cook.

is the meat i cooked on it edible?
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:28 PM   #7
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Yep the meat should be fine. Next time, heat the pan then add some fat. Once you add the fat then you can add the meat and you will be good to go.

Cast iron takes a little getting used to, but not much. You will love it in no time.
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:35 PM   #8
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What pieces did you get? Thankfully, I have a Lodge outlet store about 30 minutes from me to feed my cast iron cravings. It has some remarkable deals on factory seconds that cook just as good as the "first" and have more character to boot. :)

------
Some seasoning info that is better than what comes from the factory:

www.camp-cook.com :: View topic - Dutch Oven - Basic Technique

Cast Iron
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:37 PM   #9
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Sorry for all these questions but I am very technical. I asked if the meat was still edible because maybe some of the glue was being cooked with the meat even though I took the glue off and rinsed the skillet?

By the way, HOLY COW, I overcooked the meat. I cooked it for less than 2 minutes. I cant believe how fast it cooked. I am not used to this hehehe
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Old 01-07-2008, 11:38 PM   #10
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The glue will not hurt you. You removed it before you cooked with it. Any remaining residue won't do any damage.
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