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Old 12-25-2005, 11:41 AM   #1
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Question New Toy. Pressure cooker recipes?

I received a beautiful All American Pressure Cooker for Christmas. I've wanted one for a looooong time. This is my first pressure cooker - the recipes in the instruction book seem dated - one calls for a stewing chicken - I've not seen those in years and years!

Anybody got any yummy recipes they'd like to share? I'm thinking about a maiden voyage of Corned beef and Cabbage - beyond that I'm open! TIA

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Old 12-25-2005, 11:53 AM   #2
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Spareribs with Barbecue Sauce

This is a recipe from Kitchenelf that I like - she has a ton of pressure cooking recipes.

Spareribs with Barbecue Sauce

3 pounds spareribs, cut into serving pieces
Salt and pepper
Paprika
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 large onion, sliced
1/4 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/8 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
1 1/2 cups water

Season ribs with salt, pepper, and paprika. Pour vegetable oil into pressure cooker and heat to medium. Brown ribs on medium heat. Add onion. Combine ketchup, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, chili powder, celery seed, and water in a separate bowl. If desired, stir in 1/4 teaspoon liquid smoke. Pour over meat in cooker. Close cover securely. Place pressure regulator on vent pipe and cook 15 minutes at 15 pounds pressure, with regulator rocking slowly. Let pressure drop of its own accord.

Miss Vicky has a cool site with some recipes too - and I think she is a member here.

http://missvickie.com/
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Old 12-25-2005, 12:46 PM   #3
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Pressure Cookers are cool

Ooooooh! You must have been an extra good girl this past year.

Great present. I love my pressure cookers! Yes, I have three that I use quite frequently. I have a 4 quart, an 8 quart and a fancy 8 quart countertop electronic model that can be time delayed, will brown and steam.

Here is a great resource site for pressure cooking with recipes, cooking times for all types of foods and more:

http://missvickie.com/

Corned beef and cabbage is one of my frequent dishes thanks to the pressure cooker. Don't think that you need to throw everything into the cooker at once and cook everything at the same time. When I cook corned beef and cabbage I cook the corned beef for about 40 minutes, do a quick depressure (run cold water over the lid), and then add all my veggies, cabbage, carrots and potatoes. Bring the pot back to pressure for an additional 10 minutes and let depressurize naturally (sit for 10-15 minutes off heat).

Perfect results for my family.

I also have a beans and rice recipe that everyone loves.

See: Newby ISO Pressure Cooker Recipes

This forum has great pressure cookers recipes scattered throughout.

Enjoy! Merry Christmas!
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Old 12-26-2005, 12:33 PM   #4
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Thanks! The pressure cooker I got says in the instructions NOT to cook beans, rice or pasta in the cooker and never to do the quick release method (with cold water) as it is a metal to metal seal. Seems to me beans would be an natural for this cooking method. Any thoughts?
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Old 12-26-2005, 01:09 PM   #5
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Beans absorb the water and will easily scorch in a pressure cooker. Also, higher than normal pressures can develop which can cause catastrophic failure of the pot (it can explode like a bomb!). And pasta will turn to a gloppy mess as it is too easily overcooked in a pressure cooker. And if it seals with metal to metal contact, I agree, quickly cooling the lid with cold running water will break the seal, and could be dangerous, as the lid will contract in size faster than will teh pot. The pan relies on even heating and cooling to maintain it's pressure-tight seal.

Just some food for thought.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 12-26-2005, 02:18 PM   #6
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All of my pressure cookers have rubber sealing rings which seal the lid and pot to maintain pressure, so I don't have the same metal to metal seal restrictions.

I have never cooked pasta in the pressure cooker since the regular cooking times are not that long, but I cook rice and beans regularly without problem. The main problem with beans, rice and pasta would be foaming. I'm sure that you've experienced how easy it is to boil over these foods when cooked with a lid. This foaming could cause a fowling or blockage in the pressure relief valve in the lid of the pressure cooker and cause over pressurization.

No pressure cookers should ever be filled more than 2/3 to 3/4 full (per the specific cooker instructions). The basic principle of pressure cooking is that when pressure is increased greater than 1 atmosphere, water boils at a higher temperature and thus foods can be cooked at a higher temperature and will cook faster. It is a fact that liquids cannot be compressed and in order to create a higher temperature you must have an air space which can be compressed. Without the air space the pressure vessel could build up excessive and dangerous pressure and rupture violently.

That said, today's modern pressure cookers are designed for safety and constructed of materials which are inherently safe when used properly.

I'm afraid that if my pressure cooker had a limitation on cooking beans and rice that I'd replace it. I cook beans and rice in it weekly.
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Old 12-27-2005, 05:25 AM   #7
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I am also fairly new to the wonder of pressure cooking, but the more I learn about it, the more I am getting to love this brilliant cooking tool. I use it often to steam the vegetables, also to cook the whole potatoes (which takes much less time than boiling in water, without them absorbing too much water, which is a great way to make gnocchi!!).

One of my another favourite is to cook my meatloaf, it comes out so much moister and tender than the traditional oven method.

Also this link contains a lot of practical info along with recipes with pressure cooking.
http://homecooking.about.com/library...ressure+cooker

I hope you will as much fun with your new toy just as I do!!
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Old 12-27-2005, 12:50 PM   #8
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I'm going to interject my 1 1/2 cents here - I can certainly understand with a metal to metal seal about not using the quick-release method. Beans produce a lot of foam when cooked in a pressure cooker and they can clog the vent hole - that's why they don't recommend it. I have a pressure cooker cookbook that says beans are fine to cook if you use 3 TBS of oil for the first cup and then 1 TBS of oil for each additional cup of beans cooked. The oil prohibits the foam from forming.

Now, I have 1/2 cent of info left, anyone want it?
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Old 12-27-2005, 12:56 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
...Also, higher than normal pressures can develop which can cause catastrophic failure of the pot (it can explode like a bomb!)...
Pressure cookers are equipped with safety devices that prevent the build-up of excessive pressure. They don't explode like a bomb, a pressure valve releases pressure. Also, some recipes call for quick cooling under running water to prevent overcooking.
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Old 12-27-2005, 01:14 PM   #10
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Andy, do you think because of the metal against metal it would cause uneven cooling using the quick cooling method which could cause warping? I've always had a rubber gasket. I re-iterate what Andy said about pressure cookers now having safety features - they are very safe to use now.
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