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Old 01-11-2009, 12:33 PM   #21
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The best way I've found is to scrub it really well with a wire brush, then wash and dry thoroughly and season immediately. The pan rusted because the iron wasn't protected by a good seasoning.

Seasoning isn't a one-shot process, though. It takes time, but is more than worth it when you end up with a pan that performs as if it was coated with Teflon.
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Old 01-11-2009, 12:34 PM   #22
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I stumbled onto these forums and I am hooked! My first question of many to come. How can I remove rust from a cast iron pan?
Depending on the severity of the rust, anything from steel wool to an orbital sander....There are chemical rust removers, but caution must be exercised when using them...They will/may/can burn you...

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Old 01-11-2009, 01:22 PM   #23
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If there is enough old crud on the exterior of a CI pan to catch fire, I would just toss it on the grill and leave it until it no longer burned. Steel wool, or, my favorite, a disc sander, would then easily remove the ash. Reseasoning is not that hard, With old CI, I generally clean and reseason anyway. Cleaning with steel wool is often a long process. One note on chemicals. Know what you are using, and if in doubt, use it outdoors, as Bob said, chemicals can be dangerous. Personally, I use as few as possible around my kitchen. Rust on CI is usually easily removed. Use steel wool, or a sander.
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Old 01-11-2009, 04:00 PM   #24
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I stumbled onto these forums and I am hooked! My first question of many to come. How can I remove rust from a cast iron pan?
White vinegar is good for rust. Use it with a plastic or steel scouring pad. If it is really heavy rust you many need something like naval jelly but that is nasty stuff to use on cookware so I would make that a last resort.
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Old 01-11-2009, 05:06 PM   #25
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Wondering if anyone uses cast iron on a glass top stove? And if so what type of results compared to gas or electric burners?

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Yes. All the time. Works great.
When I was looking at getting a glass top stove the salesman told me that I could not use my CI on it becasue it would scratch the surface and ruin it. Now I'm really confused...
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Old 01-11-2009, 05:59 PM   #26
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When I was looking at getting a glass top stove the salesman told me that I could not use my CI on it becasue it would scratch the surface and ruin it. Now I'm really confused...
If you are worried about scratching any surface, get a diffuser plate, and that sits atop the burner and the CI goes on top. Nothing to scratch!!! William Sonoma has them in large and small, and once you get the name of the brand you can probably get it online cheaper.

ENJOY.

Those usually scratch and turn colors from oil spots anyhow. Even the newer electric rangetops have the same glass infused over steel and also have those problems. I use BON AMI to remove the oil spots from both the range top and the enamel cast iron!

Candy
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Old 01-11-2009, 07:47 PM   #27
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Thanks for the tips! I'm gviing the steel wool and reseasoning a try.
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Old 01-14-2009, 05:15 PM   #28
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If you are worried about scratching any surface, get a diffuser plate, and that sits atop the burner and the CI goes on top. Nothing to scratch!!! William Sonoma has them in large and small, and once you get the name of the brand you can probably get it online cheaper.

ENJOY.

Those usually scratch and turn colors from oil spots anyhow. Even the newer electric rangetops have the same glass infused over steel and also have those problems. I use BON AMI to remove the oil spots from both the range top and the enamel cast iron!

Candy
I want to caution using a diffuser plate on a glass top stove. If you do not use a flat bottom pan with direct contact you run the risk of damaging your glass top stove elements. I had a tea pot with a bottom that had two rings that were recessed which meant the bottom was not entirely flat. It would leave dark rings on the glass top after using from trying to heat evenly. I managed to clean them off with scrubbing. If you do not use flat surface pans the heating element can not heat evenly and can cause damage to the heating element.

From posts and more of my own research I have decided I will use CI on my glass top as long as it is flat, and I won't drag or slide it across the glass top. I may try to use enamel coated on the outside of CI to eliminate scratch worries. I have an enamel coated grill pan that is CI on the inside and am going to give it a try.
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Old 01-14-2009, 08:11 PM   #29
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I can not speak from experience but I have seem many reports of people successfully using CI on glasstop stoves.

Good luck
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Old 01-16-2009, 08:05 AM   #30
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Thanks for the input on Ci and glass tops. Think I am going to go with the standard coil electric when I replace this one. I do have pots and pans that are not completely smooth and I'm not willing to give them up.
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