"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-08-2004, 07:22 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
RockAndFire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 25
Send a message via ICQ to RockAndFire
Pain in the @$$ cookware

Are any of you familiar with the Kirkland stainless steel cookware line? It's essentially a carbon copy of the Emeril Lagasse All-Clad stainless steel line. I really don't like it. It has like an extra layer of steel on the very bottom, and all it accomplishes is that it takes longer for the skillet to heat up, AND it's more difficult to regulate cooking temperature on the fly! Before I used these pans, I was using a set of anodized aluminum calphalon ones and I positively ADORE those. To make matters worse, my stupid apartment has electric burners : ( Which aren't terrible, but I do miss my gas ones. Sigh.. I do have 1 non-stick skillet that doesn't have that gigantic plate of steel on the underside..
Is there some trick to using these pieces of junk? I'm sure some of you have either these generic "Kirkland" brand ones, or the All-Clad ones.. Part of this post was my need to vent. I'm very picky about my cooking supplies.

__________________

__________________
RockAndFire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2004, 03:55 AM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA,NewJersey
Posts: 403
It's good to vent :)

It's sounds like you're up against it on two fronts, electric burners and more heat retentive cookware.

You probably already know this but both are going to take some getting use to I'm afraid.

Heat retention in a frying pan is not all that bad. Things stick on a lot less when the heat is distributely more evenly. I've starting using my cast iron more lately and I've noticed that there's a delay to everything I do. If the heat is too hot, I can take it off the burner and it will still be too hot. If it's too cold, I can put it on the hot burner and it'll remain too cold for a few seconds while the iron heats up. As long as I'm aware of the lag, I can adjust my actions accordingly but I have to admit, it takes some getting use to.

As far as electric burners go, that's a tough adjustment as well involving yet another time lag. My trick for using an electric burner is removing the pan for a quick drop in heat, rather than waiting for the element to slowly cool.

Are you psychic? With this kind of equipment you practically need to be :)
__________________

__________________
scott123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2004, 03:21 PM   #3
Senior Cook
 
LMJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Kent, Ohio
Posts: 216
I hate to rub salt in the wound, but the fact that they were a knock-off of something Brillohead attached his name to shoulda told you something... :?

I agree with lifting the pan when using electric rather than turning down the heat. Electric SUCKS, but it is manageable so long as you've got sufficient thermal power in the burners.
__________________
"It's not a bald spot, it's a solar panel for my electric personality."
-Red Green
LMJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2004, 01:16 PM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 5
It seems weird to me that you would complain about the heat retention qualities of the thick bottom pans. Aren't the Calphalon pans pretty thick? I generally look for thicker pans when I am shopping... My heat retention means easier heat regulation. I cook on electric and once you know what settings to use on you dials it is fine. (I do get some hots spots, but I find rotating the pan 180degrees generally helps even that out.)

Oh... And I use the Emerill series pans from All-clad. For the money, the quality is actually really good. (About half as much as I would have paid for a stainless steel All-clad or Calphalon set.... Which I hope to have one day...)
__________________
skippysan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2004, 01:32 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
RockAndFire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 25
Send a message via ICQ to RockAndFire
I guess it's just the way that I cook, or the types of dishes that I prepare. But 70% of what I make requires that I regulate temperature while cooking (usually between ingredients), and I've found that these pans take MUCH longer than the Calphalons that I was using before I moved (which were made of aluminum, i don't care for stainless steel). And the thickness of those Calphalons doesn't even come close to that of these ones. Oh well, I'll deal..
__________________
RockAndFire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2004, 10:55 PM   #6
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA,NewJersey
Posts: 403
Although you're dealing with heat retention as well as conductivity, my handy dandy conductivity chart has helped me understand frying pans a little beter. It's from Alton Brown's Gear for Your Kitchen.

Thermal Conductivity Coefficient:
Silver .96
copper .94
Aluminum (spun or pressed) .53
Cast aluminum .33
Steel .16
iron .12
Stainless Steel .05
__________________
scott123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2004, 12:06 AM   #7
Master Chef
 
-DEADLY SUSHI-'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: NW Chicago Burbs'
Posts: 6,070
Send a message via Yahoo to -DEADLY SUSHI-
Hey.... cool chart! Thanks. :)
__________________
-DEADLY SUSHI- is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2004, 12:53 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Seattle
Posts: 246
The pot or pan matter little.

The way to deal with the need for different temps on an electric stove [assuming you feel you need super quick changes in temp] is to set another burner to the next temp you need, then slide it over --'course you must then set the last used to the next requirement.... Then all you need to do is use what ever pan you're using on the burner you need at that minute.

What I don't like about cooking on electric is that I have to think! What a pain.

Oh yes, The Laminates really do make things easier-- you can be more asleep at the wheel-- but almost anything will cook well if you are the cook and it is the tool.
__________________
May you eat well,
Robert
Robt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2004, 05:46 AM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA,NewJersey
Posts: 403
Edited. There must have been a computer glitch because what was here originally I did NOT post (it was a duplicate entry of my TCC chart above). Very weird.
__________________

__________________
scott123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stovetop cooking with Pyrex Visions cookware? anchita Cookware 17 01-18-2013 05:21 AM
Members Mark Tri Ply Cookware? oldhat Cookware 24 05-03-2006 10:39 PM
Electric stove top... what's the best cookware? LisaGHM Appliances 5 02-01-2005 10:22 PM
Le Creuset Cookware on a radiant cooktop chef_wannabe Cookware 6 11-18-2004 04:09 PM
Replacing cookware glennm Cookware and Accessories 17 01-14-2003 09:32 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.