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Old 05-07-2009, 02:37 PM   #11
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sorry elf, im with GB

i keep my pizza stone in the oven at all times - normally, i bake at 350 - 375....with pizza, i bake as high as 475

since ovens heat in cycles, we can probably assume that actual temp gets as high as 500-525* when making pizza....so far, there has been no damage to my stone, so we must have different types of stones
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Old 05-07-2009, 02:39 PM   #12
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We have a HearthKit that we purchased on sale from KingArthur some 4 or 5 years ago. Wouldn't be without it (unless we had an oven that had one already built in).
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Old 05-07-2009, 02:42 PM   #13
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Are you sure yours was stone and not paper KE

I got my stone years ago. I do not remember where I got it from, but it is at least 7 years old and has lived in my oven full time since I got it. I never take it out other than to brush burnt on crud off it from time to time. It gets heated up to 500 degrees weekly and goes through the self cleaning cycle anytime I run it.

Pampered chef stones are on the expensive side, but everyone I know who has had one raves about them. You can also go the inexpensive route and get unglazed quarry stone from your local hardware store for a few bucks and those will work perfectly.
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Old 05-07-2009, 04:10 PM   #14
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patina it.
get your stone hot as hell, rub it down with a dry kitchen rag and coarse salt work on small spots at a time and dont burn yourself.
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Old 05-07-2009, 04:37 PM   #15
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whats the point of a patina? it's not like a carbon knife where you need to worry about reactivity, and you aren't trying so "season" it and create a non-stick surface

or were you recommending that as a way to clean it?
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Old 05-07-2009, 04:40 PM   #16
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just recomending as a way to clean not season
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:08 PM   #17
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Several years ago I was at my son's house and about to do some cooking when I saw the pizza stone in the oven and it looked awful. I'd never used one so being the mom-in-law I thought it should have been cleaned. I resisted! Then they gave me one and mine looks at least as bad as hers. I only clean mine with a spatula or a scrubbing sponge - no soap and let it dry. It looks ugly - but it cooks great. I doubt if baking soda or salt would take the stains off mine, but I can live with them.
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:42 AM   #18
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I have stones from pamper chef and My DH left it in the oven and turn on the self clean, POP we got a nice mess to clean, I think hand cleaning is the way to go and you don't want complete clean , adds more a nicer crust.
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Old 05-13-2009, 12:12 AM   #19
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My Pampered chef exploded around 550 degrees...

Have a no name generic i got for xmas years ago that has no issues at higher temps though.

I guess the main points are:
-Verify your pizza stone is ceramic stone; some cheap imitations use other materials...
-never put anything on your stone besides pizza or water, the pores will suck up anything it touches, my first pizza stone made a excellent dawn degetergent flavored crust.
-Extreme temperature changes is typically what cracks a stone; never put a a cold stone in a hot oven, never de-glaze a hot stone with cold water.
-sticking problems; add more cornmeal
-enjoy the patina of the pizza's of the past :)
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Old 05-13-2009, 08:30 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zerobane View Post
My Pampered chef exploded around 550 degrees...

Have a no name generic i got for xmas years ago that has no issues at higher temps though.

I guess the main points are:
-Verify your pizza stone is ceramic stone; some cheap imitations use other materials...
-never put anything on your stone besides pizza or water, the pores will suck up anything it touches, my first pizza stone made a excellent dawn degetergent flavored crust.
-Extreme temperature changes is typically what cracks a stone; never put a a cold stone in a hot oven, never de-glaze a hot stone with cold water.
-sticking problems; add more cornmeal
-enjoy the patina of the pizza's of the past :)
Excellent advice here!
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