"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-16-2006, 09:34 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Texas college town
Posts: 192
Hi,

I loved using a carbon steel knife when I lived in the dry climate of inland Southern California. When I moved to humid Central Texas, it was just too hard to assure that the knife was absolutely dry after every use. Instead of drying and putting away, it was dry & wipe with oil and put away--and any tiny spot that the oil missed would rust! I spoke with one old-time Texan about this, and he said he just kept his carbon steel knives in a bowl of old grease.

I got rid of the carbon steel knives, and started my current collection of knives: stainless, "high carbon" types. Much easier in this climate!
__________________

__________________
TexanFrench is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2006, 09:47 AM   #12
Executive Chef
 
YT2095's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Just left of Europe and down a bit.
Posts: 3,875
Send a message via MSN to YT2095
the most frequently used blade in my kitchen is this: http://shibazi.com/product/S601.htm
it`s in Surgical steel, and takes an edge you can shave with, you simply cannot go wrong with surgical steel.
the local butcher has carbon steel blades and doesn`t have a problem with them, but I should imagine that cutting and choping meat all day with it`s fat content, he`s unlikely to encounter problems.
for a Once in a While use, I shouldn`t think CS would be the best choice.
__________________

__________________
So long and Thanks for all the Fish ;)

YT2095 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2006, 09:52 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 4,655
MLB, have a look at New West KnifeWorks (.com) THe chef knife is "stainless" but very high carbon ... It is a fantastic knife. I now know 4 pro chefs who use it. No more expensive than a fine German blade, worth your time to check it out. I bought one as was sold.
__________________
Robo410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2006, 09:55 AM   #14
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 1,129
Send a message via AIM to college_cook
I have to agree with lisa here. I think especially in a home kitchen, a stainless steel knife keeps it edge long enough for most people. Even working in a professional kitchen, where a blade can get dulled fairly quickly, I only had to sharpen my blade for the first time after about 3 months. I know some of the other chefs I work with lightly sharpen their stainless blades as much as once a week, but these are the same chefs who neglect to steel their knives as often as they should. Keep in mind though, that those other chefs also break down dozens of chickens, ducks, various whole fish, and beef sides every week.
__________________
college_cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2006, 01:13 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Brukky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 14
It really depends on what you want to do, and what feels comfortable to you.

While I love the really expensive, really delicate handmade Japanese knives, I must say, it's just not always practical.

Globals and MACs have to be my favourite. Very good knives, handle great, take an edge fairly easy, and the best part: they put up with a ton of ****. I've used my 10 inch Global in a kitchen, on the line for every day for the past year. This means it's been through a lot, and it works like a charm. One minute I'm cutting through a French Cut of Lamb, hitting a bone here and there, and then a minute later I'm brunoising the skin of a tomato as garnish... Globals never let me down.
__________________
Brukky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2006, 03:21 AM   #16
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 34
You can get a knife from lee valley tools that has an edge of carbon steel and a body of SS. www.leevalley.com
__________________
ntbsnthlrchn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2006, 06:03 PM   #17
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 298
Quote:
Originally Posted by YT2095
it`s in Surgical steel, and takes an edge you can shave with, you simply cannot go wrong with surgical steel.
Surgical steel doesn't mean anything. Any steel can be surgical steel. It just has to be able to be sterilized and used for surgery.
__________________
thymeless is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2006, 06:57 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: japan
Posts: 462
when i worked professionally, all of my knives (with the exception of a cleaver) were stainless. now i've come to prefer softer steels; mainly because they sharpen up so nicely. a couple of licks on the steel 2 or 3 times a month and a quick brush-up on the stones 2 or 3 times a year. the only stainless knife i now use on any regular basis is my serrated bread knife.

other than needing to be kept clean and dry, i haven't noticed any problems. a patina will build over the course of time, but comes off quite easily with a scouring pad. i'n not prepping dinner salads the day before, so discoloration of lettuce or onions hasn't been a problem for me.

basicly, the ease of sharpening and the edge they take outweigh what i see as a very minor inconvenience in care.
__________________
let me make sure that wine's ok before i use it.
philso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2006, 07:37 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
JDP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 281
Send a message via Yahoo to JDP
Quote:
Originally Posted by thymeless
Surgical steel doesn't mean anything. Any steel can be surgical steel. It just has to be able to be sterilized and used for surgery.
Dittos. Surgical is simply a marketing term without meaning. Kind of like Folgers and Mountain Grown Coffee. All coffee is mountain grown, but it sounds good.

JDP
__________________

__________________
JDP is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.