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Old 04-21-2016, 09:36 PM   #1
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Second Hand Pasta Machine - safety hazards from polymer clay

Hi everyone,
I have been pondering the purchase of a second hand pasta machine from THE AUCTION SITE - *BAY. A used Atlas Ampia or Atlas 150, currently there are some good looking units available for about $30 total cost.
My biggest concern is that most of the vendors do not know if the unit they sell has been used for pasta or for polymer clay. I am willing to take the plunge moneywise but have no clue how to tell one way or another and I do not want to expose anyone to poisonous pasta...

How can I tell if a machine has been used for clay?

Do not want to pay full price for a new machine simply because I am not confident I shall be using it frequently enough.

All thoughts are appreciated. Thank you for your time.

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Old 04-21-2016, 09:41 PM   #2
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I think, unless you trust the seller and can ask directly, you would be better off buying a new pasta maker.

I use mine for polymer clay, and it looks just fine, but I would never use it to make pasta. Good for you to be concerned.
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Old 04-21-2016, 09:45 PM   #3
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I have an Atlas pasta maker and love it. I think if you review the instructions at this link for cleaning a pasta maker, you might be more comfortable purchasing a used machine.
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Old 04-21-2016, 09:49 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
I think, unless you trust the seller and can ask directly, you would be better off buying a new pasta maker.

I use mine for polymer clay, and it looks just fine, but I would never use it to make pasta. Good for you to be concerned.
Thank you for your fast response Dawgluver.
Does the polymer clay leave any visible residue? Smell maybe? Should you see a used machine would you be able to tell if it was used for polymer clay? Thanks again.
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Old 04-21-2016, 10:00 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
I have an Atlas pasta maker and love it. I think if you review the instructions at this link for cleaning a pasta maker, you might be more comfortable purchasing a used machine.
I think I would want to boil all the parts and then empty the water through a strainer so as not to lose any parts. Then reassemble.
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Old 04-21-2016, 10:03 PM   #6
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Second Hand Pasta Machine - safety hazards from polymer clay

Quote:
Originally Posted by chessplayer View Post
Thank you for your fast response Dawgluver.
Does the polymer clay leave any visible residue? Smell maybe? Should you see a used machine would you be able to tell if it was used for polymer clay? Thanks again.

My polymer clay books all say to never use a pasta machine for making pasta once it's been used for clay. My machine is clean as a whistle, no visible residue, no smell, but there's all sorts of ways that the parts inside can trap clay bits.

Polymer is an interesting substance. If you boiled your machine, it would be similar to cooking the clay as you would for jewelry or dolls. It would stick really well.
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Old 04-21-2016, 11:03 PM   #7
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I have a thrift store Atlas 150. Came with a ravioli attachment and two widths of noodles. Works nice. I also picked up the three piece Kitchen Aid set, different thrift store, for five bucks. Haven't used them yet.
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Old 04-21-2016, 11:09 PM   #8
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I have a thrift store Atlas 150. Came with a ravioli attachment and two widths of noodles. Works nice. I also picked up the three piece Kitchen Aid set, different thrift store, for five bucks. Haven't used them yet.
How did you clean/sanitize? Thank you for posting.
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Old 04-22-2016, 10:48 AM   #9
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I never use a machine for making tagliatelle or pasta sheets - it's easier and quicker to do it by hand, but I would buy a pasta extruder machine so I could make pasta shapes like tortiglioni etc.

Most of my cookery friends make their pasta by hand, and it's surprisingly easy, although, obviously, the consistency of the mix is crucial, both with egg pasta and water pasta. You have to dedicate a bit of time to do it, but it freezes (as you will all already know) like a dream, and the satisfaction factor when you've done it is amazing! The result from the pan is also better.

Once you've got the drift of doing it, you can make hand made pasta in minutes, and it freezes well (both filled pasta i.e. ravioli and plain pasta. Put it in the freezer in trays covered with grease proof paper.

Making your pasta by hand is surprisingly therapeutic - all in all, I wouldn't have a pasta machine for all the tea in China, but we're all different, with different priorities, so all I can say is, give it a try some time. The satisfaction factor is awsome.

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Old 04-22-2016, 11:32 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by di reston View Post

Making your pasta by hand is surprisingly therapeutic - all in all, I wouldn't have a pasta machine for all the tea in China, but we're all different, with different priorities, so all I can say is, give it a try some time. The satisfaction factor is awsome.

di reston

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I agree about the therapeutic quality of handmade pasta and bread. I used to do both until the pain from arthritis in both my hands was unbearable. That's where my pasta machine came into being. I also use a bread machine to do the kneading and first rise of my bread products. I would like to get lost in the processes of pasta and bread making but that's no longer in the cards for me. In the last three years I have had to have reconstructive surgery on both my hands due to arthritis so those enjoyable cooking processes will have to be a memory for me.
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