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Old 01-11-2013, 08:09 AM   #11
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Get it sand blasted Oven cleaner etc is just filling up a very porous metal with toxic chemicals. You may get rid of the 'surface' crap but the chemicals will still be in those millions of tiny craters.
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:24 AM   #12
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I would not use sandblasting, sand paper, or any abrasive. You can harm the pan. I season several a year, and clean with a lye bath.

Go to a hardware store and get a can of lye drain cleaner. You will also need a 5 gallon plastic bucket. I use the ones that restaurants throw away. Mix the lye according to the directions. Attach a wire coat hanger for a handle to the pan, dip, cover, and forget it for a couple of weeks. Your pan will emerge clean. If you have rust, clean with vinegar. Rinse well, and you are ready for seasoning.

The lye bath can be reused over and over.
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:28 AM   #13
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Get it sand blasted Oven cleaner etc is just filling up a very porous metal with toxic chemicals. You may get rid of the 'surface' crap but the chemicals will still be in those millions of tiny craters.
A lot of collectors who season dozens a year would disagree with both these statements.
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:30 AM   #14
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Yeah I chose the oven cleaner method for the lye. It should only be a couple more days now.

Here is today's progress:


There is some really thick stuff on the bottom and sides. It's coming slowly though. Next time I will either stick it in a fire or get a stronger lye. This is a long but great method for cleaning CI recommended by many and it works pretty well. I am just anxious for it to be clean so I can season it and start using it.
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Old 01-11-2013, 09:44 AM   #15
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I have to assume you're enjoying this lengthy process.
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:16 AM   #16
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I have to assume you're enjoying this lengthy process.
Lol! I have to admit it is fun getting up in the morning to see my progress. So, yes, maybe a little
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:19 AM   #17
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Lol! I have to admit it is fun getting up in the morning to see my progress. So, yes, maybe a little
That's good. Once you get it clean and reseasoned you'll be able to enjoy it.
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:35 AM   #18
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I used a wire wheel and hand grinder on mine, too, but mine was all rusty.
For as far along as you are you could pick up a welding wire brush at a hardware store and take care of that last bit. It's a simple hand tool and pretty cheap. It will double as a grill cleaner.
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Old 01-11-2013, 01:26 PM   #19
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A lot of collectors who season dozens a year would disagree with both these statements.
I assumed the poster was interested in actually using to fryer....not hanging on a wall. Pretty hard to imagine a cast iron fryer being "harmed" from a trip to a sand blaster. What's going to happen? The 'sand' is going to makes holes in the fryer? LOL Sand for sand blasting is formulated NOT to erode or "harm" what it's 'blasting. There's dozens of different types of 'sand'. You can 'sand blast' 24K gold with finely ground goose feathers if you want to and not "harm" it.
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Old 01-11-2013, 01:58 PM   #20
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Aside from the expense if you don't do it yourself, sandblasting either will not get to the gunk in the pores, or it will remove metal to do so. In addition, sandblasting can leave the surface rough. Either way, you are better off with removing the old seasoning and gunk with chemicals or heat. Heat has the possibility of warping or cracking the pan, although if the heat is applied evenly, the chances are small, and I have used heat on some pans with no problem. A self cleaning oven will heat evenly as it is started cold and the pan warms up all at the same time.

The chemicals used, i.e oven cleaner or lye, are not particularly toxic in residue form. Lye is used in food processing, particularly to remove outer layers in corn for hominy. Oven cleaner, if that toxic, would not be used for cleaning ovens.

Most cookware collectors that I know do use their kitchen equipment, be it copper, CI, or old electrical devices.
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