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Old 03-23-2017, 12:11 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Hi, welcome to D.C. You were cooking with oil over high heat. That's why some of the oil made those stains. It ain't easy but barkeepers friend and a scrub sponge is the way to go. It takes some scrubbing.

Not everything you cook will cause this but it will happen in high heat situations.
"Steel wool", perhaps (like Brillo Pads but without the pink soap).
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Old 03-23-2017, 12:37 PM   #12
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Same here, although I do use a cast iron skillet for steaks on the stove. I don't see any reason to season stainless steel.
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Old 03-23-2017, 02:07 PM   #13
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According to Ray Peat, there are two main types of stainless steel, magnetic and nonmagnetic. The nonmagnetic form has a very high nickel content, and nickel is allergenic and carcinogenic. It is much more toxic than iron or aluminum. You can use a little “refrigerator magnet” to test your pans. The magnet will stick firmly to the safer type of pan.
I think you have this backwards. "Food grade" stainless is either type 304 or 316 stainless steel, with 304 being the most commonly used in cookware. 300 series stainless steels contains nickel and are non-magnetic. 400 series stainless does not contain nickel and is magnetic. 400 series stainless steels are not as corrosion resistant as 300 series so are not generally used for cookware.

Google "food grade stainless" for further information.
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Old 03-23-2017, 02:15 PM   #14
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The nonmagnetic form has a very high nickel content, and nickel is allergenic and carcinogenic. It is much more toxic than iron or aluminum.
Are you saying that a cast iron pan is toxic to use? Sorry, that is not true. A negligible amount of iron could be transferred into food by using cast iron, but it's an essential nutrient - it's not toxic in normal doses except for people who suffer from hemochromatosis, which is fairly rare.

Normal use of aluminum is not toxic, either. Toxicity depends on exposure and dose. A tiny bit of X is fine, while a huge dose of anything, including water, can be toxic.
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Old 03-23-2017, 02:17 PM   #15
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According to the All-Clad website, their stainless line is made from 18/10 stainless steel and is magnetic (compatible with induction cooktops).
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Old 03-23-2017, 02:54 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Not refuting Steve, but I treat my SS pans differently. I don't try to season them.
I should clarify. When I say "season" stainless, I don't mean in the same way as you would season a cast iron or carbon steel pan. With those pans, you typically use very high heat to polymerize several coats of oil onto the surface of the pan.

What I do to prepare an SS pan for first time use is a little different. First, I give it a good cleaning, then I set it over a medium heat burner to gently warm the pan. Once heated, I rub some cooking oil into the surface with a paper towel. I then set it off the heat and, once it's cooled, wipe out any remaining oil. When finished, you shouldn't see any residual oil on the surface.

For the most part, I don't like to use soap on my pans (with the exception of Teflon or enameled cast iron) if it isn't needed. Usually, I can just wipe it down good with a paper towel, and it's ready to go for next time. If I do have to scrub an SS pan with soap, I go through the oiling process again before putting it away.

I actually picked up this trick from Le Creuset. It's what they recommend for their SS pans, and it really does help to prevent food from sticking, provided you're also using the pans correctly. I've had no problem at all cooking omelets and fish in SS pans without stuff sticking (but it's still not my favorite kind of pan for those applications).

I'm struggling to find a better word than "season," though. Maybe "conditioning?"
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Old 03-23-2017, 03:00 PM   #17
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According to the All-Clad website, their stainless line is made from 18/10 stainless steel and is magnetic (compatible with induction cooktops).
18/10 is 18% chromium 10% nickel, so it's a 300 series stainless. My understanding is that induction ready stainless must have a 18/0 (400 series) magnetic cladding layer or disc. I believe that All-Clad has a 304 layer on the inside and a 400 series layer on the outside, but not positive.
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Old 03-24-2017, 08:42 AM   #18
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I took a magnet to my All-Clad fry pan. Definitely stronger attraction to the outside of the pan, especially the base. The sides are relatively thin, so the attraction is weaker.
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