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Old 08-27-2016, 09:43 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
I need new tea kettle and am looking for some advice and hoping you will share your experiences.

I currently have a chantal stainless kettle that is disaster. The handle gets hot enough to raise blisters, it leaks around the bottom where the bottom is crimped onto the sides but it has an amazing two tone whistle that has averted many disasters.


Does you have a tea kettle you love? Any advice about a replacement?
I've got an enamel one with a handle that feels like rubber which I bought from Amazon. Doesn't get hot. Attractive but slow compared with my electric one.

A work colleague who was a keen save the world-er once told us that it's more economical to use an electric kettle than a stove-top one. You "pays your money and you takes your choice" as my grandad used to say.
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Old 08-27-2016, 12:09 PM   #22
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Thanks for the suggestions - keep em coming. Electric is off the list. I have a gas stove and use the tea kettle daily for boiling water (coffee and tea) and as handy water to thin sauces and deglaze. The tea kettle lives on the stove top and is a work horse.
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Old 08-27-2016, 01:08 PM   #23
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I've been reading about the quality of water for making tea and coffee. Out of all the types of water - from the faucet, and from other sources, they said that the best was spring water. Guess what guys! We have a well that we didn't know we had when we first arrived, but stopped using it because it's heavy work bringing all that water up to the top, and using the pump leaves water everywhere. I'm going to start using it again! It's also good for hand washing, and it works the muscles in your arms too. Our dog loves it too, especially in the hot weather when it's nice and cold. The tea? It's just great. All we have to do is to get the water analysed. Water for free!
That depends on where you live and what kind of water you have. Our well water has a lot of iron in it. It has stained everything red in the backyard where we use the sprinkler to water the garden. We don't drink it, but it's nice to have.
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Old 08-27-2016, 10:58 PM   #24
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expatgirl, if you do any online shopping for food, check out Harney Tea. They have a wonderful, diverse selection of teas. Their website is full of information about the different teas, with details on flavor and tea color. I've shopped their stores, stumbling upon their little shop in the home town that John Harney had first started and meeting the great man himself. I've toured their processing facility, and have shopped a number of times at their "new" store and cafe in Millerton, NY. I have found them very helpful when shopping at the store, explaining and suggesting. IF you are totally clueless when it comes to tea, you might want to send them an email asking for suggestions on the types a real novice would enjoy. I bet they could make suggestions that you would be happy with.

What I like about shopping the store is you can sniff the tea leaves, the brewed tea, and sip a few samples. Think "Penzeys for Tea". Since you don't have that luxury, I hope the website gives you some help.

****************

Addie, those copper bottom Revere kettles are the best, aren't they? When we replaced our old electric stove with heating coils with the new, glass-top one, I couldn't use it anymore. The rim around the bottom edge that bound the bottom to the sides was too thick, and the kettle bottom didn't sit flat on the stovetop. After decades of wonderful service, I moved it to our daughter's. She has a gas stove, so I still get to use it when we're back home to visit.
You are so right. I would never get rid of mine. My granddaughter bought me a new kettle that looked like a flying saucer. It flew out the door in about two weeks. Out came my Revere ware kettle never to be replaced again.
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Old 08-28-2016, 09:58 AM   #25
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My British friends think my boiling water for tea on the stove is something approaching hedonistic barbarism. It seems everyone in England has a nice electrick water boiler, and they use that neat and quick to feed the teapot.

You can get an electric kettle it seems overseas in any convenience store, haberdashery, or grocery.

I, for my many sins, am now and likely in the future cursed with an electric range. I know, it is horrible, I really want a gas range.

So, in this fallen world I find myself in, I take some comfort in CAST IRON.
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Old 08-28-2016, 03:56 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
My British friends think my boiling water for tea on the stove is something approaching hedonistic barbarism. It seems everyone in England has a nice electrick water boiler, and they use that neat and quick to feed the teapot.

You can get an electric kettle it seems overseas in any convenience store, haberdashery, or grocery.

I, for my many sins, am now and likely in the future cursed with an electric range. I know, it is horrible, I really want a gas range.

So, in this fallen world I find myself in, I take some comfort in CAST IRON.
On the rare occasion I make tea, I always boil the water. Having been married to an Englishman, I wouldn't dare not to.
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Old 08-28-2016, 04:06 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
expatgirl, if you do any online shopping for food, check out Harney Tea. They have a wonderful, diverse selection of teas. Their website is full of information about the different teas, with details on flavor and tea color. I've shopped their stores, stumbling upon their little shop in the home town that John Harney had first started and meeting the great man himself. I've toured their processing facility, and have shopped a number of times at their "new" store and cafe in Millerton, NY. I have found them very helpful when shopping at the store, explaining and suggesting. IF you are totally clueless when it comes to tea, you might want to send them an email asking for suggestions on the types a real novice would enjoy. I bet they could make suggestions that you would be happy with.

What I like about shopping the store is you can sniff the tea leaves, the brewed tea, and sip a few samples. Think "Penzeys for Tea". Since you don't have that luxury, I hope the website gives you some help.

****************

Addie, those copper bottom Revere kettles are the best, aren't they? When we replaced our old electric stove with heating coils with the new, glass-top one, I couldn't use it anymore. The rim around the bottom edge that bound the bottom to the sides was too thick, and the kettle bottom didn't sit flat on the stovetop. After decades of wonderful service, I moved it to our daughter's. She has a gas stove, so I still get to use it when we're back home to visit.
Hey, Addie, thanks for the reference.....we have many British friends and others but none have recommended "Harney's" my daughter and sister drink nothing but hot tea.....so I will definitely look into it......too bad I just arrived back in Oman before seeing your post....well,,,,,,,Christmas is around the corner and I'll be back in the states!
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Old 08-28-2016, 04:08 PM   #28
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I probably just like hot water, and I'll put my kettle on it, cast iron kettle, and a replacement for the sheet steel kettle. I am just, BTW about to buy some tea from Upton,
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Old 08-28-2016, 04:12 PM   #29
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btw......every Brit we know, uses an electric kettle (must be the oil industry!!!).......love 'em especially when I need to add hot water to a roux, soup, beans, etc., so it doesn't slow down the cooking temp and hence the time......also my hot water heater is up in the 2nd floor attic and it takes forever for the water to get hot, so I use my "British kettle" to make hot water for washing up dishes, etc.
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Old 08-28-2016, 04:18 PM   #30
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Hey, Addie, thanks for the reference.....we have many British friends and others but none have recommended "Harney's" my daughter and sister drink nothing but hot tea.....so I will definitely look into it......too bad I just arrived back in Oman before seeing your post....well,,,,,,,Christmas is around the corner and I'll be back in the states!
That was Cooking Goddess that made the reference. Look at the Harney site and see if they ship overseas. Also look into shipping costs for overseas. It may be too expensive.
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