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Old 09-12-2015, 04:18 PM   #111
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Originally Posted by CStanford View Post
If you have a defective burner then you have to work around that. What would you do if you got a new stove? Otherwise, the food gets cooked in the strike zone not high and outside. We're trying to hit a home run here not foul one off behind the plate.
The hot spot isn't that bad. I turn the pot. Sometimes I use it to advantage. It's easy to work around, just like you work with your hot spot in the middle of your pans.

And when I use CI and turn the pot, it really makes no difference, since the CI heats and cools more slowly.
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Old 09-12-2015, 04:43 PM   #112
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Oh well, people talk about hot spots like something's wrong. Nothing is wrong, that's where the food goes! Don't put it around the outside of the pan like petals on daisy. It looks as stupid as it is.

If through some quirk of material physics some isolated spot near the outside of the pan manages to get hotter than where the flame is then that's a pan you should unload. I've personally never seen it. Ever. But I suppose it could happen.

Happy Cooking. Heat is good!

Cheers,

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Old 09-12-2015, 05:10 PM   #113
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Originally Posted by CStanford View Post
Oh well, people talk about hot spots like something's wrong. Nothing is wrong, that's where the food goes! Don't put it around the outside of the pan like petals on daisy. It looks as stupid as it is.

If through some quirk of material physics some isolated spot near the outside of the pan manages to get hotter than where the flame is then that's a pan you should unload. I've personally never seen it. Ever. But I suppose it could happen.

Happy Cooking. Heat is good!

Cheers,

Pope Charlie
My first thought was that it was the pan. Then I remembered that it was always in the same place relative to the stove and on every pot. No flame on my electric stove, when things are working right.
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Old 09-12-2015, 05:28 PM   #114
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My first thought was that it was the pan. Then I remembered that it was always in the same place relative to the stove and on every pot. No flame on my electric stove, when things are working right.
Well, don't throw anything out based on how it performs on an electric eye.
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Old 09-12-2015, 07:41 PM   #115
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Well, don't throw anything out based on how it performs on an electric eye.
It's not a big enough problem to even go to the bother of replacing the element. It's one of those older stoves with spiral shaped "burners".
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Old 09-12-2015, 08:05 PM   #116
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My whole reason for introducing the ideas of hot spots was to show that for many recipes, hot spots are not good. If you want to gently simmer a rich sauce or gravy, and you can't be watching the pot constantly because there are other things to be done, hot spots can cause the sauce or gravy to burn at just that spot, ruining the whole pot. Also, when searing a large chunk of flat meat, such as a porterhouse, hot spots can cause a portion of the meat to overcook, or even scorch before the rest of the meat is cooked to the desired temp. It has nothing to do with placing your food where the flame isn't, such as the outside rim of the pan.

With my gas stove, the flame comes out the side of the burner and bends upwards in a ring. It then travels to the outside of the pan, and up the sides. That's simple physics. Hot air rises and will continue to do so until it escapes its confines, i.e., the middle of the pan. Hence, the center of the pan is cooler than where the flame first touches the pan, and then travels outwards. There are devices that help spread the heat across the whole pan or pot bottom. These are known as diffusers, and help eliminate hot spots to promote more even temperatures along the entire cooking surface, thereby cooking the food more evenly.

The idea that hot spots are good is absurd. Hot spots make cooking things like rice, beans, sauces, flat pieces of meat, stews, etc. difficult. Ever find a bit of scorched food in the bottom of a chili pot? That scorched flavor will permeate the whole of the product, making it less desirable, or even, if scorched enough, inedible.

As for your statement about putting foods around the outside of a pan like the petals of a daisy, and calling that stupid, that is somewhat condescending, and is at times, just plain wrong. With my wok, I regularly use the hot spot, the very flat, and center part of the pan, to quickly stir-fry the food, moving it to the cooler slopes of the sides, where the heat is much milder and won't overcook the food, but will still keep it warm, as I add more ingredients to the recipe. I have been known to do such things by keeping the flame lower, and using the pan sides of my 11 in CI pans to do the same thing.

Ever try to cook English Muffins in a dry pan, with hot spots? It doesn't work well, same with pizza.

You may know something about the type/style of cooking that you do. But there are so many techniques out there that you don't have a prayer at knowing them all. I invite you to discuss your opinions intelligently, giving, and taking from the discussion. That's why we discuss things, to help each other, and to learn from each other. But I promise you, that if you try to force your opinions and ideas upon everyone, and not listen to the responses, people will stop discussing things. I, for one, won't be dictated to. I have engineering knowledge, a scientific background, 40 years of cooking experience, and an intense desire to know how, and why things work. I know a lot about cooking, a significant amount about physical properties of materials, and how food reacts, and understand that there are people in this forum that know significantly more than I do. I am constantly learning new things here, and sharing things that I learn with others.

Remember, there is never a reason to call someone else's idea stupid. The name of this site is DiscussCooking, not - I am the only good cook on the site. You may disagree with something that someone has said. When that happens, it is your responsibility to argue your viewpoint, politely, with substantive fact to back up your ideas. There may even be times when you are absolutely correct, but can not convince someone else. Then, you just politely walk away. Where there is contention, no one learns anything, and pride rules.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 09-12-2015, 08:22 PM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
My whole reason for introducing the ideas of hot spots was to show that for many recipes, hot spots are not good. If you want to gently simmer a rich sauce or gravy, and you can't be watching the pot constantly because there are other things to be done, hot spots can cause the sauce or gravy to burn at just that spot, ruining the whole pot. Also, when searing a large chunk of flat meat, such as a porterhouse, hot spots can cause a portion of the meat to overcook, or even scorch before the rest of the meat is cooked to the desired temp. It has nothing to do with placing your food where the flame isn't, such as the outside rim of the pan.

With my gas stove, the flame comes out the side of the burner and bends upwards in a ring. It then travels to the outside of the pan, and up the sides. That's simple physics. Hot air rises and will continue to do so until it escapes its confines, i.e., the middle of the pan. Hence, the center of the pan is cooler than where the flame first touches the pan, and then travels outwards. There are devices that help spread the heat across the whole pan or pot bottom. These are known as diffusers, and help eliminate hot spots to promote more even temperatures along the entire cooking surface, thereby cooking the food more evenly.

The idea that hot spots are good is absurd. Hot spots make cooking things like rice, beans, sauces, flat pieces of meat, stews, etc. difficult. Ever find a bit of scorched food in the bottom of a chili pot? That scorched flavor will permeate the whole of the product, making it less desirable, or even, if scorched enough, inedible.

As for your statement about putting foods around the outside of a pan like the petals of a daisy, and calling that stupid, that is somewhat condescending, and is at times, just plain wrong. With my wok, I regularly use the hot spot, the very flat, and center part of the pan, to quickly stir-fry the food, moving it to the cooler slopes of the sides, where the heat is much milder and won't overcook the food, but will still keep it warm, as I add more ingredients to the recipe. I have been known to do such things by keeping the flame lower, and using the pan sides of my 11 in CI pans to do the same thing.

Ever try to cook English Muffins in a dry pan, with hot spots? It doesn't work well, same with pizza.

You may know something about the type/style of cooking that you do. But there are so many techniques out there that you don't have a prayer at knowing them all. I invite you to discuss your opinions intelligently, giving, and taking from the discussion. That's why we discuss things, to help each other, and to learn from each other. But I promise you, that if you try to force your opinions and ideas upon everyone, and not listen to the responses, people will stop discussing things. I, for one, won't be dictated to. I have engineering knowledge, a scientific background, 40 years of cooking experience, and an intense desire to know how, and why things work. I know a lot about cooking, a significant amount about physical properties of materials, and how food reacts, and understand that there are people in this forum that know significantly more than I do. I am constantly learning new things here, and sharing things that I learn with others.

Remember, there is never a reason to call someone else's idea stupid. The name of this site is DiscussCooking, not - I am the only good cook on the site. You may disagree with something that someone has said. When that happens, it is your responsibility to argue your viewpoint, politely, with substantive fact to back up your ideas. There may even be times when you are absolutely correct, but can not convince someone else. Then, you just politely walk away. Where there is contention, no one learns anything, and pride rules.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
+1. Eloquently stated, as usual, Chief
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Old 09-13-2015, 08:23 AM   #118
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+2 Chief. Besides anyone who watches or has watched Hell's Kitchen, knows that the cooks in these high end type restaurants, only need to concentrate on one, maybe two items, not the whole meal as we home cooks have to. Besides, cooking is supposed to be enjoyable, not something to deal with under the relentless "whip" of some arrogant head chef, trying to win those "stars". Michelin Stars mean buffalo chips to me.
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Old 09-13-2015, 09:07 AM   #119
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Cook in middle of the pan where the bloody heat is, put a couple products down in the pan, cook product on high(er) heat than you may be used to (not always, but generally), remove product to warm platter, cook next round.

If you feel like it, cook in two 10" pans simultaneously but always, always cook in the middle of the pan. Don't put product in a circle around the outer diameter of the pan where it bakes off the side of the pan and/or gets steamed on the side closest to the edge of the pan. This can give the product a tough, chewy side. If you just can't resist this then make sure you use a slope-sided skillet, the more severe the slope the better.

Promise it'll work.
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Old 09-13-2015, 10:17 AM   #120
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Cook in middle of the pan where the bloody heat is, put a couple products down in the pan, cook product on high(er) heat than you may be used to (not always, but generally), remove product to warm platter, cook next round.

If you feel like it, cook in two 10" pans simultaneously but always, always cook in the middle of the pan. Don't put product in a circle around the outer diameter of the pan where it bakes off the side of the pan and/or gets steamed on the side closest to the edge of the pan. This can give the product a tough, chewy side. If you just can't resist this then make sure you use a slope-sided skillet, the more severe the slope the better.

Promise it'll work.
Okay. We get the message. You just seem hell bent on convincing everyone that your knowledge is more superior to every member of this forum. We are home cooks, not restaurant chefs with so many Michelin Stars. The "Gee Mom/Dad, that meal was great" is what makes our day. We don't expect anyone to send back a note with a generous tip to the kitchen for the cook on how great the meal was.

We have the appliances and equipment that we can afford. Most of us are using what we bought or received as gifts when we were first starting out as cooks or newlyweds. Over the years we may replace some of those appliances or equipment as our income increases. We seek the advice of friends on what to purchase. Some of us even have our grandparents kitchen equipment that has been passed down. I still have my grandmother's wire pastry blender. A grandmother's cast iron pan is most likely the most treasured item in a kitchen. Go down south to any local restaurant that is known for their fried chicken. You most likely will find that they make it in an old cast iron pan.

I no longer have my cast iron pan. Only because it became too heavy for my arthritic hands to pick up. It was my grandmother's. My daughter now has it. Fourth generation. The majority of cast iron pans found in today's home kitchen have a history. And they are dearly loved. Happy memories are always there when those pans hit the stove top!
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