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Old 09-11-2014, 10:43 PM   #21
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Great advice from Andy. I would just add that if you wait overnight or longer to wash cast iron, it will be harder to clean, just because the residue will have hardened, and you will be tempted to scrub more than necessary to get it clean. This might not be good for the seasoning.

They're great pans. I love mine.
If the pan is well seasoned then it will be fine with scrubbing, even hard scrubbing.
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Old 09-11-2014, 10:48 PM   #22
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to be clear, laddie, scrubbin is ok if'n ya ken how.

only with a scrubby sponge; no harsh steel wool, nor chemicals. just soap and water weel do.

(anyone else watchin "outlander".?)
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Old 09-11-2014, 11:24 PM   #23
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I guess another question I have is what is the proper step after washing? is it...

Paper towel dry, stove top heat dry, then thin coat of oil
OR
paper towel dry, thin coat of oil, then stove top heat.
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Old 09-12-2014, 05:19 AM   #24
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I guess another question I have is what is the proper step after washing? is it...

Paper towel dry, stove top heat dry, then thin coat of oil
OR
paper towel dry, thin coat of oil, then stove top heat.
Always dry complete before oiling. Adding oil before heating it to dry could trap water under the oil and cause problems later.
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Old 09-12-2014, 08:29 AM   #25
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Long and short of Cast Iron. The material is cast iron, and is extremely susceptible to corrosion (rust). The cast iron, if unseasoned, may have a protective coating of wax to prevent its contact with air (oxygen) to prevent corrosion. Anything and everything will stick to the bare metal like crazy.

To prepare an unseasoned, new cast iron pan, Scrub under hot running water, with soap to remove any coating. Immediately dry with paper towels, inside and out. Rub inside and out with a solid fat, i.e. shortening, or lard in a very thin layer. Place into a 350 to 400 degree oven and let bake for 30 minutes. Remove, taking care not to burn yourself on the hot metal, and repeat. The pan now has a coating of hardened oil (carbon) that encapsulates the entire pan, making it both slippery to food, and isolated from oxygen.

As you cook with oil, the thickness of the carbon coating thickens and becomes harder. Over time, it will be hard to remove this protective coating. The coating also keeps food from contacting the raw iron, eliminating any metallic flavor from the food. This metalic flavor is the result of acidic, or alkali foods leaching iron from the pan.

A pre-seasoned pan or pot requires only a light cleaning before use, but is made more durable with successive seasonings of the pan. Cook with fat (oil or grease) will add layers of seasoning to the pan.

After using, simply place the pan under hot, running water, and scrub with a nylon scrub brush to remove any food bits, and excess oil. Wipe dry with a paper towel, or dry on a hot burner, then add a tbs. of oil to the pan. Wipe to a shine with paper towels. Store when cooled.

Tip, Grease and oil can clog drains. If you don't use soap to clean the pan, put the drain plug into the sing, along with a good, grease emulsifying soap such as Dawn Dish Soap. Hold the pan under the running faucet and cleans as described above. The fat will empty into the sink, where the soap can liquify it so that it won't stick to your drain pipes, preventing clogged drains.

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Old 09-12-2014, 09:01 AM   #26
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One more tip: As my mother did. I keep a pickle or sauce jar under the sink for pouring out excess oil. When it's full, I throw it away. This keeps the oil from going down the drain. It's also bad for the water system beyond your pipes.
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Old 09-12-2014, 09:21 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by dc2123 View Post
I guess another question I have is what is the proper step after washing? is it...

Paper towel dry, stove top heat dry, then thin coat of oil
OR
paper towel dry, thin coat of oil, then stove top heat.

I dry the pan on the burner, wipe it with oil and heat it some more then let it cool on the stove.
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Old 09-12-2014, 09:49 AM   #28
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I don't use my "naked" cast iron for gravies. I use the enamelled cast iron for stuff like that. I haven't washed the "naked" cast iron in years. I wipe it. When necessary, I sprinkle a good coating of salt, heat gently, and scrub with a bamboo wok scrubber. If it's really dirty, I add a little bit of oil to the recalcitrant areas (on top of the salt) and let it heat for a bit longer and then use the wok scrubber.

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Old 09-12-2014, 10:18 AM   #29
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I save the left over chicken fat, or pork fat (bacon or ham) for cooking. Oils are used to ignite charcoal on my Webber.

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Old 09-12-2014, 10:23 AM   #30
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I use a broom-corn pot scrubber. I've had it for years and it works great. Might plant broom corn next year to make a few replacements...
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