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Old 02-03-2012, 12:59 PM   #11
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Old 02-03-2012, 02:42 PM   #12
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I own both. But if I were only buying one, I would probably go for the larger size, especially if you cook for company from time to time, or make food to freeze. Having said that, there's two of us in my house, so I use the smaller one more often. There have been quite a few times I've been glad I had the larger one, though.
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Old 02-03-2012, 04:38 PM   #13
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I got a 7 quart round LC pot just a couple of months ago and I have already used it more than I have used my 6.75 quart oval in the nearly ten years I have had it. I have have only used my 5 quart once since I have had the big pot. I have a lot of Cook's Illustrated magazines and recipes and you would be surprised how many of them call for a "large Dutch Oven.

I love the width that allows for easier browning before a braise and it has become my favorite pasta pot because it is wide enough to lay most long pasta flat during cooking.
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Old 02-03-2012, 04:45 PM   #14
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Maybe I'm an oddball, but for braising I prefer my 8-quart oval to any of my round ones. Lot's more bottom surface, for browning, and plenty of room for the other ingredients.

Of course, if you really want great tasting braises, it's time to dig out the tajine.
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Old 02-03-2012, 05:02 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Maybe I'm an oddball, but for braising I prefer my 8-quart oval to any of my round ones. Lot's more bottom surface, for browning, and plenty of room for the other ingredients.

Of course, if you really want great tasting braises, it's time to dig out the tajine.
Doesn't it stick out beyond the burner by a lot? What do you prefer about oval?

What do you prefer about the tajine? I have what I call a short Dutch oven. It's as big at the base as my larger Dutch oven, but it's only about 3 or 4 inches tall. I really like that one.
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Old 02-03-2012, 07:11 PM   #16
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Doesn't it stick out beyond the burner by a lot?

Yes. But so what? I didn't (and don't) want to get into an argument over it, but I disagree with your basic premise---particularly when cast iron is concerned.

What do you prefer about oval?

Exactly what I said above. For the space it occupies it has more surface area, for browning, and more room for other ingredients once they're added.

Virtually all soups and stews taste better as they age. I always make far more than needed for the meal, then package and freeze the balance for later use. The oval just works better for that.

It's also better for reducing gravies and sauces, because the surface-to-volume ratio is higher than with a round pot of comparable size.

What do you prefer about the tajine?

Tajine cookery is easily the subject of it's own thread. But, essentially, the self-basting nature of the design, along with the flavor-enhancing quality of clay, make it a perfect cooking vessel for those kinds of dishes.

I have what I call a short Dutch oven.

Here we get into definitional issues. I cook with real Dutch ovens, and have problems when the term is used to describe flat-bottomed, dome-lidded pots. Trying to figure what a pot is that I've not seen is, therefore, next to impossible. Sounds like a roundeau, from your description. But I've never seen them made of cast iron.
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Old 02-03-2012, 08:25 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HistoricFoodie View Post
Doesn't it stick out beyond the burner by a lot?

Yes. But so what? I didn't (and don't) want to get into an argument over it, but I disagree with your basic premise---particularly when cast iron is concerned.
I don't have a premise. I was just wondering if it did make a difference.

Quote:
What do you prefer about oval?

Exactly what I said above. For the space it occupies it has more surface area, for browning, and more room for other ingredients once they're added.
I just did the math. Yes, oval will usually have a larger surface area. I have one oval and one round Dutch oven that each hold 5 litres and the footprint of the oval one is a larger area. Who knew?

Quote:
Virtually all soups and stews taste better as they age. I always make far more than needed for the meal, then package and freeze the balance for later use. The oval just works better for that.

It's also better for reducing gravies and sauces, because the surface-to-volume ratio is higher than with a round pot of comparable size.

What do you prefer about the tajine?

Tajine cookery is easily the subject of it's own thread. But, essentially, the self-basting nature of the design, along with the flavor-enhancing quality of clay, make it a perfect cooking vessel for those kinds of dishes.

I have what I call a short Dutch oven.

Here we get into definitional issues. I cook with real Dutch ovens, and have problems when the term is used to describe flat-bottomed, dome-lidded pots. Trying to figure what a pot is that I've not seen is, therefore, next to impossible. Sounds like a roundeau, from your description. But I've never seen them made of cast iron.
I really have no idea what to call the thing on the left. It has the same footprint as the 5 litre Dutch oven and the lid is the same size. I really like the surface area to volume ratio on the shorty.

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Old 02-03-2012, 08:57 PM   #18
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Hmmmm. I raised 8 children and went from all the transitions involved. Now it's just the two of us and...I still use my large Le Creuset dutch oven.

I'd still opt for the larger one. I've discovered that I'd rather have a little more room than be looking for a way to scrape stuff out of a pot that's too small.

And, yes, I have horrid arthritis in both my hands but I still find a way to make my big pot work. That is, I put it on the stove and add my ingredients as called for using a large measuring cup/bowl so I don't have to move an already heavy container filled with a ton of stuff.

In my experience, I'd say go for the larger dutch oven.
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Old 02-03-2012, 09:02 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I really have no idea what to call the thing on the left. It has the same footprint as the 5 litre Dutch oven and the lid is the same size. I really like the surface area to volume ratio on the shorty.
I believe the one on the left is called a braiser. Or at least that's what Le Creuset calls that style of pot. The one I have looks like this:

Product: 5 QT. Braiser
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Old 02-03-2012, 09:36 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I believe the one on the left is called a braiser. Or at least that's what Le Creuset calls that style of pot. The one I have looks like this:

Product: 5 QT. Braiser
Thank you. That inspired me to do some googling and in French it is called a "cocotte basse" (a low Dutch oven).
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