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Old 05-02-2008, 11:09 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by DrThunder88 View Post
From that video, it doesn't look like it's that hard to do.

Of course, when they go to put words on my tombstone, they will be, "It doesn't look like it's that hard to do."
What I meant was that I didn't realize how many steps are involved. The process is more time consuming than I had previously thought.

One college summer I worked for a Wisconsin millworking company glueing 1" x 1" x whatever making 3' x 7' slabs for solid core doors. Once the glue dried the slabs were went to huge milling machines and were then cut to correct length and width. Total time was almost nothing except for waiting for the glue to dry. The best part of the job was having my nose over the glue pot all day long....
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:01 PM   #12
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Well you don't have to do all the cutting like he did; it could be simple, same size boards. I would recommend that for the first time anyway. What he did was a professional job. One thing I did not like was the finger grip idea. By doing what he did you basically loosing one side of the board. I would recommend making grove in the edge of the board. Then both sides are totally equal. Also I would recommend making the board thicker; of course it would be more expensive.
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:28 PM   #13
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Another idea would be to use his already suggested technique of purchasing different types of cutting boards, cutting them to the appropriate sizes, and gluing them together in designed patterns. The cutting boards at places like WalMart aren't very expensive, but come in a suprizing variety such as hard rock maple end cut, bamboo, and oak. By mixing the three different woods, you could come up with a visually striking, and highly useful end product. Also, by using ready made boards as the basic building material, you could change the thickness of the end product by simply laminating another board on top of the first board. I believe this sould also inhibit warping by creating a laminate joint on the horizontal plane relative to the board., or, better yet, glue and end grain board to a horizontal board to give it structural integrity in two planes. Of course, the end-grain board woult have to be on top.

Just an idea.

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Old 05-02-2008, 12:47 PM   #14
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Well you don't have to do all the cutting like he did; it could be simple, same size boards. I would recommend that for the first time anyway. What he did was a professional job. One thing I did not like was the finger grip idea. By doing what he did you basically loosing one side of the board. I would recommend making grove in the edge of the board. Then both sides are totally equal. Also I would recommend making the board thicker; of course it would be more expensive.
Good ideas for sure. My wife uses this end grain walnut board but instead of letting the board rest on the counter top it has feet to help prevent moisture accumulation.
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Old 05-02-2008, 12:57 PM   #15
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The cutting boards at places like WalMart aren't very expensive, but come in a suprizing variety such as hard rock maple end cut, bamboo, and oak.
Oak is a hardwood, but it is open grain. Lots of little places for bacteria to hide.

If you don't have the appropriate tools, your local mill will cut the pieces for you. You can turn square stock into blocks on a miter saw, glue up your design, then bring the board to a cabinet shop or equivalent and have the run it through their belt sander.

Use slow setting glue. You can get some more ideas and instructions looking for game board plans (like checkers/chess)
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Old 05-02-2008, 01:41 PM   #16
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Oak is a hardwood, but it is open grain. Lots of little places for bacteria to hide.

If you don't have the appropriate tools, your local mill will cut the pieces for you. You can turn square stock into blocks on a miter saw, glue up your design, then bring the board to a cabinet shop or equivalent and have the run it through their belt sander.

Use slow setting glue. You can get some more ideas and instructions looking for game board plans (like checkers/chess)
Ahh. Thanks for the oak info. My dad had a cutting board made from a solid oak slab that he used for years. I inherited it when he passed on. I have it attached to a card table to give me something to connect my fly-tying vises and other tools to. I also have a hard rock maple butcher's block table in my kitchen and various wooden cutting boards. I do like the sound and thought of bamboo cutting boards. I checked out some at a local store and they look and feel great. One day, I'm gonna have to get one.

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Old 05-04-2008, 06:36 PM   #17
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I am a new member, just joined today 5/4/08.

There is a ton of advice about how to make a good cutting board. The vast majority is awful advice that has little if any basis in fact or reality. Hard maple is the best material for a board, glass and stone are the worst materials. Plastic is little better and bamboo is, no matter how you package it, still grass. Very hard, made with tons of resins and other things and finished with who knows what type of finish that may or may not be food safe. The general rule of thumb is to use a wood from a tree that has an edible nut. The major exception is oak, far to porous. And a lot of the exotic woods are highly toxic. If the bugs won't eat it, stay away from it. Locust wood is a prime example of a domestic wood to avoid. I have heard of a little locust killing a mule.

Another consideration is the machinery used. You can't make a quality board with homeowner type tools, to flimsy and inaccurate. I have been making blocks and boards for 16 years and would welcome any questions that anyone may have.
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Old 05-04-2008, 08:51 PM   #18
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Another consideration is the machinery used. You can't make a quality board with homeowner type tools, to flimsy and inaccurate. I have been making blocks and boards for 16 years and would welcome any questions that anyone may have.
Just elaborate a little on the machinery/tools please. If someone, like the original poster, wanted to construct their own personal board, what would you recommend for them?
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Old 05-04-2008, 09:35 PM   #19
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The first challenge is to size the stock. This takes a good table saw and a better jointer. Flattening the stock on a jointer is critical as everything else depends on that flat surface. Sharp blades and square fences will make the final result better.

Glue is another critical area. Yellow carpenters glue and the type 2 glues aren't adequate. Polyurethane glue is waterproof but not food grade. And it stains the wood. A type 3 cross-linked polymer glue that is rated food safe is the best choice.

To try to put an end grain block through a planer is a huge mistake. Very hard on the machine, the blades and the stock. The only way to flatten an end grain board is on a wide belt sander. The best and most economical way is to rent time on a commercial sander, more than worth the time and expense. I normally haul a load weekly to a commercial shop. The $50 per hours is a great investment that saves me hours of tedious sanding.

Sanding after the wide belt sander can be a chore. Light weight homeowner tools just can't do the work adequately. This is where the dollars invested in tools equals the work value received. (A $50 belt sander can't do the same work as a $250 belt sander and won't last as long.)

Last but not least is the choice for seasoning. Vegetable and olive oil are the choices for the unknowing and uninformed. They will go rancid. Either use nothing or use mineral oil.

Cutting boards are a good project for someone with a lot of time to experiment with. But for someone who is serious about the results, the labor involved may be a deterrent.

What tools to use - No suggestions other than to purchase the best you can afford and don't skimp on quality.
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Old 05-04-2008, 11:28 PM   #20
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Exactly my original point. That is why I gave up on that project.
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