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Old 09-04-2006, 05:51 PM   #1
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Turkey rub

Looking for ideas to try something different on Turkey. Thinking of a dry rub. Prior to smoking pork or fowl I usually let it soak overnight in a kosher salt solution. Plan to do that with the turkey but I don't have a clue for a rub. Any ideas?

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Old 09-04-2006, 06:05 PM   #2
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First off, welcome to the site!

It sounds like you are talking about two different things though. A kosher salt solution (liquid) is a brine. a rub (also called dry rub) does not have any liquid.

If it really is a dry rub you are looking for then this one is my favorite. I have used it on turkey and it is great. It is also perfect on chicken, pork, and even fish. It is best to rub this on good and then let the meat sit for 24 hours, but even if you rub it on a minute before cooking it will still be good.

2 parts fresh ground black pepper
2 parts lemon pepper
2 parts cayenne pepper
2 parts chili powder
2 parts dry mustard
2 parts light brown sugar
1 part tsp garlic powder
Pinch of cinnamon
Pinch of salt
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Old 09-06-2006, 08:28 AM   #3
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Hey, thanks, GB. I actually use the salt water solution on pork and birds when I am going to grill or smoke to keep mostiure in and to keep from burning when grilling. Thought I would do that then pat dry and apply the rub. I like your rub however I was hoping to find one that doesn't use cayennne or chili powder. More of a herbal type leaning toward rosemary or an italian slant. I may end up using your rub anyhow as it sounds good. Thanks again.

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Old 09-06-2006, 08:37 AM   #4
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Yes brining and then drying and putting on the dry rub would work great.

You can leave the cayenne out of my rub and it will still be great. You could try leaving out the chili powder, but that would drastically chance the flavor of the rub. The is not to say it still might not taste great, but I can't vouch for it.
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Old 09-06-2006, 08:39 AM   #5
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Mine is very simple. I just mix some cajun seasoning with olive oil and rub it on. Obviously you could just leave out the oil and rub the seasoning on dry. If you are worried about it being spicy have no fear. This rub was not too spicy for my wife's family, and they are very sensitive to spice. Of course I fried my turkey, it may intensify the spice when smoking (as I found out with some ribs recently).
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:07 AM   #6
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One I like for turkey is to rub the turkey with a lemon half, then with olive oil. Next, sprinkle the bird, including the cavity, liberally with restaurant grind pepper, salt, and ground sage. Massage well. Stuff the interior with quartered lemons, oranges, whole cloves of garlic, and whatever fresh aromatic herbs you may have on hand.
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Old 09-06-2008, 05:44 PM   #7
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I have used pickling spices, minus the bay leaf, as a rub for my turkey. I throw a handful into the brine as well. I grind the pickling spices in a reserved coffee grinder and then rub them on a wet bird making more of a paste of it. Then the bird can be smoked, baked, or roasted.
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Old 12-01-2014, 12:09 PM   #8
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Thanks

Hey thanks for all the great ideas. Lot better than trying to search for ideas on all the threads. I appreciate it.
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Old 12-01-2014, 12:12 PM   #9
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Old 12-01-2014, 01:31 PM   #10
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