"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs > Dry Rubs & Mops
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-27-2008, 11:43 AM   #11
Senior Cook
 
VaporTrail's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 191
Something I've run across is to use a touch of oil (I use EVOO on my steaks) or something else to help the rub to stay on the meat. Having the rub on the meat doesn't do as much good if it falls off halfway through cooking.

Nothing major, just maybe a 1/4 tsp of oil per steak.
__________________

__________________
Into the fires of forever, we will fly through the heavens, With the power of the universe we stand strong together
Through the forcing of power, we will soon reach the hour, For victory we ride, Fury of the Storm!
VaporTrail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2008, 12:11 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
VeraBlue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: northern NJ
Posts: 3,683
I prefer to do a rub at least a day in advance, and have been known to often do it 2 days in advace, especially for beef and pork.
__________________

__________________
How can we sleep while our beds are burning???
VeraBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2008, 04:34 PM   #13
Senior Cook
 
oneoffour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Levittown Pa
Posts: 169
Gday Haggis, I do a rub on a whole pork loin a day ahead. Put the loin on the cutting board spray it with a mist of vegetable oil and as others have post work the rub in. Any extra gets worked more on the fatty side. The meat then gets wrapped in plastic wrap and into the refrigerator until it is time to cook. Oh yeah I'll stab slivers of garlic into the meat before putting the rub on. The end result is a picture on a thread somewhere in this site.
__________________
oneoffour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2008, 04:37 PM   #14
Senior Cook
 
oneoffour's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Levittown Pa
Posts: 169
The picture is on a thread 'Happy New Year Pork Loin'
__________________
oneoffour is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2008, 07:49 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: E. Pa.
Posts: 8,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB View Post
Rubs are usually best if you rub them into the meat and then let them sit for a while. I will list my favorite rub recipe below. I use this one for everything from chicken to ribs to steak and sometimes even fish. I have rubbed this into the meat and let it sit for 24 hours and the flavors really penetrate deep into the meat. I have also rubbed this on and let sit for 5 minutes. It was still delicious, but the flavor was just on the exterior of the meat. It was not deep inside.

1 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1 tsp lemon pepper
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp dry mustard
1 tsp light brown sugar
1/2 tsp garlic powder
Pinch of cinnamon
Pinch of salt
sounds good, thanks for sharing the recipe.
__________________
LadyCook61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 01:39 AM   #16
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
I used a dry rub for the first time. My rub had 8 tablespoons sugar and 3 tablespoons salt among other spices, and it was good for 2 slabs of ribs. I'm supposed to leave the rub on the slabs for 2 hours in the fridge before cooking.

My problem: After 2 hours the ribs ended up sitting in a significant amount of liquid.

I'm concerned about the salt extracting moisture from the meat. Is this a valid concern? Should I just hold the salt from the rub and add it to the meat right before
cooking?
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 08:09 AM   #17
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Every dry rub that I have ever seen has included salt. You do not have to worry about that at all. Did you make up that rub recipe yourself or did you get it somewhere? I have never seem one that has so much sugar or one that has nothing else other than sugar and salt.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 10:01 AM   #18
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
Hi GB, thanks for your reply. It's Alton Brown's recipe. It has other spices along with the sugar and salt. I don't want the moisture pulled out of the meat before cooking...
__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 10:08 AM   #19
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
There is a technique known as dry brining. it is when salt is applied to meat a long time before cooking. initially the salt draws moisture out of the meat, but then as the salt dissolves the liquid is sucked back into the meat. i have never heard of this technique being used for ribs, but all rib rubs I have ever seen always contain salt so I would say you will be just fine. Let us know how they turn out.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2008, 10:19 AM   #20
Head Chef
 
Chopstix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Singapore
Posts: 1,323
The liquid in this case came out of the meat and stayed outside.

The ribs turned out pretty good actually, although at the back of my mind I kept thinking maybe they could have been more moist. Next time, I'll try holding the salt until the moment of cooking, just to compare results. Thanks GB!
__________________

__________________
'Never eat more than you can lift.' - Miss Piggy
Chopstix is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.