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Old 05-24-2008, 09:01 AM   #31
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As promised GB, I left the rub on the ribs for 24 hours at least, and wrapped the whole shebang in cling wrap. There was definitely less liquid seepage this time. You were so right. Thanks! :-)
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Old 05-24-2008, 09:04 AM   #32
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I am so glad it worked out well for you Choptix!!!
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Old 05-24-2008, 01:31 PM   #33
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I used to do that with the ribs - let them marinate with the dry rub overnite.

But now, I just put the dry rub on the ribs just before putting them in the oven to slow cook for about 8 hours on the lowest possible setting. And they still come out moist and fall-off-the-bone tender!
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Old 08-02-2009, 05:06 AM   #34
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I finally got to try holding off the salt from the dry rub. I let the ribs sit in the rub for a couple hours, then added the salt right before cooking. The result? The moistest, most tender rib meat I've ever done. There was no liquid seepage during the dry marinating, meaning no evidence of moisture being extracted from the meat. The flavor of the meat was not affected by the timing of the salt's addition.

I've done this new procedure twice already and the results were the same both times. I'll never go back to adding salt into the dry rub again :-)
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Old 08-03-2009, 05:10 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix View Post
I finally got to try holding off the salt from the dry rub. I let the ribs sit in the rub for a couple hours, then added the salt right before cooking. The result? The moistest, most tender rib meat I've ever done. There was no liquid seepage during the dry marinating, meaning no evidence of moisture being extracted from the meat. The flavor of the meat was not affected by the timing of the salt's addition.

I've done this new procedure twice already and the results were the same both times. I'll never go back to adding salt into the dry rub again :-)
Adding salt just before cooking; an interesting concept indeed. Thanks. This idea needs further investigation, and I just happen to have some ribs in the freezer.

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Old 08-03-2009, 07:20 PM   #36
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Sounds great, but how 'bout no salt at all?? I'm on a salt-free diet, and after a couple of weeks of it I don't miss the salt at all. In fact lots of things are already too salty without adding any more. (and my BP is way down)
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Old 08-04-2009, 10:45 AM   #37
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Sounds great, but how 'bout no salt at all?? I'm on a salt-free diet, and after a couple of weeks of it I don't miss the salt at all. In fact lots of things are already too salty without adding any more. (and my BP is way down)
Nothing wrong with not salting the meat.

I never salt my ribs, either in the rub or before cooking.

Hott Magazine - link to my Backyard BBQ recipes (from Episode #4)

In and amongst the silliness is my recipe for a rib rub with no salt and plenty of flavor.

Recipe for my no-added-salt mop sauce is also on there.

I don't buy into Paul Prudhomme's assertion that salt is a requirement for good rub.
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Old 11-01-2011, 12:19 PM   #38
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Could I use a rub and then freeze the meat? Or would it be easyer to put a rub on while defrosting?
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