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Old 11-28-2008, 12:42 PM   #1
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A turkey sandwich Spread

Using leftovers is always a big deal around the holidays. As everyone tends to cook for an entire Army.
Thought you might like this sandwich spread to try on that Turkey and Rye sandwich. This starts as most spreads do... with the Cuisinart Food Processor.

This is a relatively easy spread to put together. Like all things cooking, setting the mise en place up at the start makes things go smoother.. and from a food safety stand point, safer.

Here we have all the ingredients needed to put together the spread.
Starting at the top and working left to right we will go through them.
2 Tbsp Mustard (this is hot guldens)
1 tsp Salt
2 Tbsp of dried onion
1.5 Tbsp of White pepper
2 Tbsp of lemon juice (this is your acid)
2 Tbsp of Sun Dried Tomato
2 tsp Dark Chile powder
1.5 tsp of rubbed sage
2 Tbsp Sweet Hungarian Paprika
1/2 Tsp Thyme (little bowl)
3 eggs, the yolk of two eggs and one whole egg
5 ounces of crisp fried drained bacon
1/3 Cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 2/3 cup of Canola Oil (or other neutral oil)
1/3 cup dill pickle chips or dill pickle parts.
Start with the begin of the emulsion as normal. So the eggs go into it, the mustard, the white pepper, and the lemon juices. Turn the Cuisinart on and start the Olive oil into the tube.

After that first third of a cup of oil is in there and emulsified it is time to add: Everything else but the bacon and pickles.

Open the lid and dump the rest of it in, save for the pickles and bacon and pulse it. Then start it spinning again and add half the remaining neutral oil. Should start to stand up like the picture below.

Then we open her up and add in the pickle and the bacon. Get it spinning again and add the remaining neutral oil until it stands like a nice spread.

Once it is done it should stand nicely and taste a little bland with some surprises in it. It will need to sit for about 30 minutes to become what it will become with blooming time.

Scrape it out into a nice food container (ask the salad bar manager at the local grocery store to sell you some of their older dressing containers. Don't forget to get the lid. My sells them to me for $1.50 each.

Ok that is all there is to it. A few words, this is a raw egg product. However the acid is balanced to kill anything bad that may be in the eggs. Don't adjust the acid.... everything else you can mess with and experiment.
I like this on both sides of the bread with the turkey, lettuce, tomato and a little onion. I prefer rye bread, but like wine, use what you want to use.
'til we talk again, get to work on the leftovers... they are not going to put themselves up....
Chef Bob Ballantyne
The Cowboy and The Rose Catering
Grand Junction, Colorado, USA

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Old 11-28-2008, 12:53 PM   #2
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Looks interesting, but around here a post-Thanksgiving cold turkey sandwich wouldn't be right without just plain Hellmann's mayo - lol!
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Old 11-28-2008, 05:34 PM   #3
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Nice recipe but I'm not aware that 2 Tbls of lemon juice in a raw egg, oil-based spread would kill salmonella or much else. Those that have issues with raw eggs might want to choose alternative approaches.
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Old 11-28-2008, 05:42 PM   #4
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While I decided not to bring that point up in my previous post, I agree. Have yet to hear or read anything that proves that the acidity of a recipe will kill salmonella or any other pathogen in raw eggs or anything else for that matter. And 2 tablespoons of lemon juice is like, nothing, in this recipe as far as acidity goes anyway?

Where did you get that information Bbally?
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Old 11-28-2008, 06:11 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Where did you get that information Bbally?
With regards to you never seeing anything in print with regard to the acidity of foods and food recipes having an effect on pathogenic activity, start with the ball canning guide... that should lead you to any number of AG Extension papers on the subject. Canning is about acidity and pathogenic control. And it is at the basic level. But effective.

The research I am referring to was first reported in the "International Journal of Food Microbiology". First reported in Mar 2003, but did not make it through peer review for acceptance until around April 2004. Several more have been released in Food Microbiology since then... (though you have to be careful with that publication as some is not peer reviewed for scientific accuracy prior to publishing.) This was the beginning of the Organic Transcellular sanitization technique. The testing used carrots innoculated with Salmonella to start with.... then progressed on as different scientist moved the methodology forward.

This was followed up with the study of Organic Acid and the ability to pass through the cell wall and kill pathogens. Mostly used now in minimal processing methods for the organic industry. Since they need sanitization methods that follow their organic code they use natural acids. Such as Citric acid and Tartaric acids.

Citric acid being the bulk of the acid in the lemon juice is the sanitizer doing the work. PH is 2.3 Tartaric is even lower... but it is being studied more for a surface sanitizer than a food sanitizer.

Might look at spritz (sp) in the super market... an organic acid based fruit and veggie prep for pathogen annilation while cleaning vegetables.

It is good advice to remember that you are working with a raw egg product. Certainly anyone whom falls into an HACCP category should not try this at all.

But between the acid and the innoculations the chickens now get for Salmonella... you will be fine... again you should be a healthy, not at risk adult to be safe.
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Old 11-29-2008, 02:08 PM   #6
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But Bbally - you're a catering company. How do you decide who's "safe" to eat your spread & who's not? Or do you only make this for yourself? (Although it does seem to make a large amount that doubtfully keeps for an appreciable amount of time.)
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Old 11-29-2008, 02:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
But Bbally - you're a catering company. How do you decide who's "safe" to eat your spread & who's not? Or do you only make this for yourself? (Although it does seem to make a large amount that doubtfully keeps for an appreciable amount of time.)
This spread is just mine at home. I make all my own mayo.

For the catering I use them single day only. Usually most of the spreads I make like this are for New York New York themes where the deli spreads must be authentic.

Of course, I have that added advantage in the Catering company that we get salmonella free eggs.
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Old 11-29-2008, 04:32 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbally View Post
This is a relatively easy spread to put together. Like all things cooking, setting the mise en place up at the start makes things go smoother.. and from a food safety stand point, safer.

Here we have all the ingredients needed to put together the spread...
Just a suggestion When I put together my mise en place, to minimize the number of bowls needed, I put in the same bowl all the ingredients that will go in together. I find this much easier and quicker to work with. HTH.
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Old 11-29-2008, 04:43 PM   #9
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Aside from the safety discussion, I would like to say that the spread looks great and sounds like it would be very tasty! Wished I had some leftover turkey!
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Old 11-29-2008, 04:52 PM   #10
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I agree GotGarlic. Unless one is doing a "photo shoot" (which I'm assuming this was), there's absolutely no reason for more than a dozen little bowls.
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