"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs > Condiments
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-25-2015, 11:08 AM   #21
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
What's the point of leaving chinks of mustard seed in the mix rather than having a smooth purée?
Because millions of people prefer a little 'texture' in their mustard. The seeds are not hard by any means.
__________________

__________________
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 11:13 AM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Which mustard seed is hotter? The yellow or brown? Are they too hard to grind using a mortar and pestle? Or would you leave them whole for the final product? When someone says they want to make their own mustard, I assume it is from scratch. And that to me means grinding the seeds. I doubt you could get it to the powdered consistency like Coleman's. But I see mustard on the grocery shelves with bits of the ground seed in them.
I find it easy, but not quick, to use a mortar and pestle to grind dry toasted mustard seeds to a fine powder. The funny thing is that black mustard seeds make a yellow powder.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
What's the point of leaving chinks of mustard seed in the mix rather than having a smooth purée?
When I buy Dijon mustard, I buy smooth and with seeds. The one with seeds doesn't taste nearly as hot, but has the Dijon flavour. It's the one I use as a condiment. I use the smooth one when I make vinaigrette. It helps with the emulsification of the oil and vinegar or lemon juice.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 02:07 PM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Interesting topic. Learning a lot here. I thought you just followed the instructions on the tin of Keen's Mustard:

For the table
"Mix gradually with cold water to the consistency of very thick cream, stirring well and breaking up all lumps.
After mixing, the mustard should stand 10 minutes to develop full flavour."

I'm not a big fan of mustard as a condiment. I use it mostly as an ingredient and usually from seed, but sometimes from powder. (Okay, I use a bit of prepared Dijon both as ingredient and condiment.)
I often sift a teaspoon of mustard powder in with the flour when making a suet pastry crust for a steak and kidney pie. And a little mustard (powder or ready mixed) is good in the cheese sauce for macaroni cheese or to pour over cauliflower or broccoli. I always have powder (Colmans, of course) and a jar of Dijon and one of coarse grain mustard on hand as they are so useful.


When we used to go to France every year many years ago, I used to bring home big stoneware jars of Moutarde de Meaux. That was lovely. It went particularly well in cream sauces for fish and chicken because it was mustard-y but mild.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 02:11 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Because millions of people prefer a little 'texture' in their mustard. The seeds are not hard by any means.
And the flavour is different.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 02:31 PM   #25
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I had picked up on that. I did say I was learning a lot in this thread.

Edit: I just checked. The stuff in the Keen's Mustard tin is just "double fine mustard", so I don't really understand what you mean by "It's already mustard", well so are mustard seeds. Isn't what you are talking about ground mustard plus other ingredients, like vinegar and salt? Certainly, stuff that is homemade and has added ingredients would very different from just adding water to mustard powder. Spices that are already ground don't have as much flavour as grinding them yourself.
Colmans English mustard comes as powder or ready made. I fined both too hot as condiments and I prefer French mustards. Colmans does make a hideous brown concoction which they call "French mustard" but bears no resemblance to any real French mustard I've ever tasted.
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 02:43 PM   #26
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,153
Odd Mustard Facts

Believe it or not, in Norwich where Colmans mustard is made there is the Mustard Shop and Museum! Essential tourist destination

Mustard oil is used a lot in cooking in northern India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, etc., and babies were traditionally massaged with mustard oil supposedly to strengthen the body.

It's used to season the playing surface in some Indian drums to improve the sound

It's painted around the doorway of the house when newly weds enter the house for the first time

(I shared a flat when I was a student with a girl who was brought up in India.)
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 02:45 PM   #27
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,045
Plain old yellow mustard makes a great base when doing a dry rub on pork. It helps the rub to stay put, yet the mustard seems to cook away and leave behind no real flavor of its own. I was skeptical the first time I did it, but you can't taste any mustard at all, even when just nibbling a piece of the crust that forms when you smoke or barbecue low and slow.

Using a teaspoon of mustard in a pint of vinaigrette also doesn't really add much if any flavor, but it emulsifies the oil and vinegar (learned that from Chef Michael Smith ).
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 03:09 PM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Colmans English mustard comes as powder or ready made. I fined both too hot as condiments and I prefer French mustards. Colmans does make a hideous brown concoction which they call "French mustard" but bears no resemblance to any real French mustard I've ever tasted.
Is there much difference between Colman's mustard powder and Keen's? It says on the tin

By appointment to
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Manufacturers of Mustard and Sauces
Colman's of Norwich

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 03:53 PM   #29
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Is there much difference between Colman's mustard powder and Keen's? It says on the tin

By appointment to
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
Manufacturers of Mustard and Sauces
Colman's of Norwich

Sounds pretty highfalutin to a lowly US peasant.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2015, 04:16 PM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,875
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Sounds pretty highfalutin to a lowly US peasant.
It probably says the same thing on the Colman's Mustard. It just means that someone in the royal household has bought it.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
mustard

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.