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Old 04-27-2006, 09:02 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abjcooking
Corinne,
After frying the meat in the oil and draining the fat you dip the piece of meat into a sauce.
Oh gosh! Thanks for explaining that to me. I had never heard of that! How interesting. What type of beef do you use? I'm assuming you slice it into thin strips or cubes to fry it.

As for the peanut sauce, I think I'd go with the jarred stuff or the mix in the package. I have a packet here from a company called "Taste of Thai". You just mix it with a can of coconut milk.

That said, I love the horseradish sauce idea that someone mentioned. I think that would be my favorite.
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Old 04-28-2006, 08:10 AM   #12
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Here are the sauces that are in my Better Homes and Gardens Fondue and Tabletop Cooking Cookbook, under the meat fondues. If you want any of them, let me know. Admins, since I am putting the name of the cookbook, is it alright to do the recipes as written?

Mushroom sauce
Tomato sauces
Curry Sauce
Sweet-Sour sauce
Bearnaise Sauce
Bordelaise Sauce
Chinese Hot Mustard
Mustard Sauces
Basil Butter
Garlic Butter
Anchovy Butter
Horseradish Sauces
Tangy Cranberry Sauce
Spicy Pineapple Sauce
Marmalade Sauce
Dill Sauce
Onion Sauces
Caper Sauce
Green Goddess Sauce {basically, cream cheese and some green herbs}
Sauce A LA Relish
Tartar Sauce
Olive Sauce
Peanut Sauce
Ginger Soy
Creamy Avacado Sauce
Wine Sauce
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Old 04-28-2006, 08:16 AM   #13
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Speaking of fondue...mmm...hubby and I went to a beautiful wedding last Saturday and they had a gorgeous HUGE chocolate fondue with tons of cut up fruit on skewers. It was delicious. We plan on getting this chocolate fountain for our daughter's Hawaiian party...yea, it won't go so well with the theme but WHO CARES, no one gives up chocolate anywhere.
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Old 04-28-2006, 08:22 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dina
Speaking of fondue...mmm...hubby and I went to a beautiful wedding last Saturday and they had a gorgeous HUGE chocolate fondue with tons of cut up fruit on skewers. It was delicious. We plan on getting this chocolate fountain for our daughter's Hawaiian party...yea, it won't go so well with the theme but WHO CARES, no one gives up chocolate anywhere.
Give them a pineapple to cut up for it
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Old 04-28-2006, 01:13 PM   #15
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Corinne, I shop at an online grocery store called Fresh Direct that is based up here. They have a special section of meat that is fondue cubs that I buy. I'm really not sure what cut they use, but it seems that the beef is much more tender than what my mom use to use.

Here is the description from their website:
A relatively tender and nicely marbled cut of meat for fondue. These cubes go with almost any kind of sauce, like mustard and olive oil or horseradish and sour cream. All you need is a fondue pot with hot liquid for cooking the meat, some fondue forks, and a variety of dipping sauces, and you've got a fondue party.

I think my mom just used stew beef cubes, so I'm sure Fresh Direct's cut is a more tender one then that. I wish I could help out further, but hopefully someone here will have some suggestions.

Texas Girl
Could you please post the recipe for the cranberry sauce, curry, marmalade, onion, and the wine if it's not too much trouble, thanks. If their long recipes don't worry about it. Since I am making quite a few sauces I need them to be easy anyways.
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Old 04-28-2006, 02:12 PM   #16
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Hi abj, I wanted to ask you how those homemade fondue pots work for you. I have seen them everywhere and have purchased some as gifts for others from their registries. I just am a bit skeptical and was looking to see if those teeny tiny flames make things nice and hot similar to the stoves at melting pot.

Any tips or tricks you use for these parties or is this the first time you are doing it. My big concerns are the size of those pots and the heat source which could increase the cooking time.

Also I enjoy broth based fondue's over the fried counterparts. I like both the wine based stock that Melting pot has and the really fragrant veggie broth. I think I need to go to melting pot again. Yummy.
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Old 04-28-2006, 02:32 PM   #17
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[QUOTE=abjcooking]

I think my mom just used stew beef cubes, so I'm sure Fresh Direct's cut is a more tender one then that. I wish I could help out further, but hopefully someone here will have some suggestions.

I think the best meat would be filet but considering the cost a sirloin or other steak meat that is tender would be excellent. Different areas of the country name cuts differently so tender is the key word.
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Old 04-28-2006, 02:40 PM   #18
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You definitely CANNOT use stew cuts of beef for fondue. Stew cuts of beef are meant for just that STEWING, as in long slow cooking.

For fondue you need cubed filet, sirloin, top round at least. What you're looking for is a cut of beef that will be tender after a quick cook in hot oil. Any cut meant for stewing isn't going to cut it - literally - lol!!
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Old 04-28-2006, 03:05 PM   #19
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Well, that would explain why my mom's wasn't as good.

Yukata,

This is the fondue pot that I got for my birthday 2 years ago.
http://www.crateandbarrel.com/family...1&SearchPage=1

As you can see at the bottom there is an area for the sterno to go. It also has a lid with holes that goes on top and this allows you to adjust the heat. The pot definitly gets hot enough to fry the beef quickly, you just have to give it a little time to heat up. Sometimes if we take awhile to eat we will need to replace the sterno, but we have never had a problem with the oil not getting hot enough. I have never been to the melting pot so I wouldn't be able to make comparisons there.

This will be my 3rd fondue party. After the first one my friend loved it so much she went out and bought one for herself. Now when we have a party she will bring her pot for the beef and we will use mine for the cheese since it has the glass insert that acts as a double broiler. Usually there will be a group of 5 of us. Since I live in a Manhattan apartment I keep everything extremely casual. I set everything out on my coffee table in a lazy susan fasion. We all sit on cusions around the table and cook and eat as we want. Usually we will watch tv or listen to music and have a few drinks while trying to keep the dogs under control.

The biggest tip I have is to make sure you have PLENTY of paper towels. I usually give each person one plate or bowl with folded paper towels in them to blot the beef and one plate to eat off of. I always keep the sterno at hand incase I need to replace it. and I try to split the food up and put it on each side of the table so you don't have to reach too far for what you need. Wear loose pants because afterward you won't be able to move.
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Old 04-28-2006, 05:02 PM   #20
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Thanks abj, that fondue pot looks high tech and the party sounds like a lot of fun.
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