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Old 08-04-2006, 07:19 AM   #11
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I had the same question for CliveB, Gretchen, but forgot to ask. Thanks for remembering!

Clive??

Also directed to Clive: since you make so many "relish-y" items, tell me, do you make an American "chili sauce"? What I'm picturing is a very chunky tomato sauce, seeds and all, with green peppers and onions and spices. Got any takes on that?
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Old 08-04-2006, 09:11 AM   #12
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There is no substitute for fresh curry leaves. You can skip the curry leaves but there will definitely be a difference in the end product.

As far as garam masala goes it is made with a number of spices but here is a good substitute you can make at home.

- 1 tsp of whole black peppercorns
- 1 small stick of cinnamon
- 3 whole cloves
- 3 cardamom pods

Dry roast it a bit and then powder it in a coffee grinder. I use one just to grind whole spices.
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Old 08-04-2006, 07:47 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
I had the same question for CliveB, Gretchen, but forgot to ask. Thanks for remembering!

Clive??

Also directed to Clive: since you make so many "relish-y" items, tell me, do you make an American "chili sauce"? What I'm picturing is a very chunky tomato sauce, seeds and all, with green peppers and onions and spices. Got any takes on that?
My " chili pepper" is simply ground up, dried hot chillies (peppers). Mostly cayenne peppers or Dutch peppers, although I occasionally add some chirel, some colorado, some ají rojo, or some pinguita de mono peppers if available!

American chili sauce? No , 'fraid not. But why not cook together some fresh(or canned) tomatoes, a green pepper, a red onion, a clove or two of garlic, a tsp or two of hot chili pepper, a finely chopped serrano, a tsp of cumin seed, a pinch of cinnamon, a tbsp coriander leaf, a tsp of sugar and half a cup of vinegar? Chuck 'em all in a large pot and cook until you get the required texture. Adjust for salt, sweetness, etc.
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Old 08-04-2006, 07:48 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
There is no substitute for fresh curry leaves. You can skip the curry leaves but there will definitely be a difference in the end product.
.
I totally agree.
Do NOT be tempted to add bay leaves as a substitute. Not even close!
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Old 08-04-2006, 10:25 PM   #15
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Clive, what do you think tamarind adds to the chutney? I am getting ready to make some and think I'll give that a try for an addition. I kind of know tamarind--can get it easily. Is it spicy? Sweetish? I know it's in Worcestershire. Thanks.
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Old 08-04-2006, 10:47 PM   #16
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Clive, do you want me to post the recipe you adapted for me? I will if you want.
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Old 08-05-2006, 03:30 AM   #17
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Clive -- if I can locate curry leaves, I'll try them.

Ditto for tamarind (thanks to my great spice site (see link under ethnic foods forum) I know how to ask for it in Greek.)

Your chili sauce recipe sounds pretty good, traditional or not. Do you preserve/can your chutneys & relishes? If so, can you elaborate a bit on how? (I'm over in the canning forum trying to learn how to do it and am stumped a bit by whether I can or cannot play around with recipes.)

Bjcotton? Never you mind what Clive wants ... you go right ahead and post that recipe!

Thanks all.
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Old 08-05-2006, 03:37 AM   #18
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Yakuta! Sorry, forgot to thank you for the garam masala substitute! Sounds really tasty.

I'll also check my spice website (the one I just mentioned which I guess everybody will think I'm getting a commission on -- not the case, I just really admire and love it!) since he has some great "spice mixture" formulas.

Thanks!
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Old 08-05-2006, 08:44 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
Clive, what do you think tamarind adds to the chutney? I am getting ready to make some and think I'll give that a try for an addition. I kind of know tamarind--can get it easily. Is it spicy? Sweetish? I know it's in Worcestershire. Thanks.
The tamarind is the fruit ( a pod) of a tree which originated in East Africa, but is now common all across the world. It is related to the pea and to the lentil.
The fruit is very acid, very astringent, and adds a deliciously fruity, fresh contrast to hot and/or sweet sauces.
To obtain the pulp, you have to soak the pods in water for a while. If you buy a block of tamarind in your local Indian grocery, for example, the outer husk of the pod will have been removed. Cover in water for about 15 minutes, then rub the fruit and the seeds through your fingers to remove the pulp. Strain through a sieve and you will obtain the pulp. This is what you use to cook with, although here in Venezuela we add sugar and water and make a drink out of it!

A wonderful stuffing for aubergines(eggplants) is to mix grated coconut, tamarind, brown sugar and hot peppers together, with a little cumin powder, salt and a tbsp of finely diced onion, barely cooked. Mix together, stuff into the aubergine then cook in a pot with a tightly fitting lid until just poached. Add a little water from time to time to avoid burning.
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Old 08-05-2006, 08:53 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
Clive -- if I can locate curry leaves, I'll try them.

Ditto for tamarind (thanks to my great spice site (see link under ethnic foods forum) I know how to ask for it in Greek.)

Your chili sauce recipe sounds pretty good, traditional or not. Do you preserve/can your chutneys & relishes? If so, can you elaborate a bit on how? (I'm over in the canning forum trying to learn how to do it and am stumped a bit by whether I can or cannot play around with recipes.)

Thanks all.
Yes, Ayrton, I preserve everything! I've got a small company which makes chutneys, sauces, hot sauces, jellies, etc.
Most of my products have sugar, salt, vinegar and spices in them, so I'm already 3/4 of the way there to perfect preserving. The fruit/sauces/veg are cooked for almost 45 minutes, in most cases, then poured into sterilised jars, capped and placed in boiling water up to their necks for 20 minutes. I then remove the jars and allow them to cool.
A little trick, I suppose - when the jar has cooled, the lid will be slightly indented or concave. This is a good indication that the vacuum has formed inside the jar.
I also test my products in a local food lab, just to be 150% sure. 100% record so far in five years.
Preserving/ canning is not difficult, but you do have to follow a set of rules. Often, you'll be able to tell if anything went "wrong" in the process when you open the jar. If it goes"POP!", it's ok; if it goes "HISSS" and little bubbles float to the surface, send it to the rubbish bin!!
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