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Old 11-06-2015, 11:53 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
My mother made that, w/o the cayenne though. We do still make it occasionally and even an Asian version with fish sauce and rice wine.
My mother's version was vinegar and salt only. I added the other ingredients.

I made an Asian version just last night, with rice vinegar, salt, sugar and cayenne. I'll try and remember to try it with fish sauce next time. It was really good with my Thai shrimp curry.
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Old 11-06-2015, 11:54 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
I got curious to find out what the original French recipe for tartar sauce was, so, having the advantage of speaking fluent French, I visited a few French cookery sites, and they all said the same thing, namely:

mayonnaise made with olive oil incorporated into hard boiled egg yolks and mustard, seasoned with salt and pepper; Then mix in carefully diced
pickled gherkins, capers, and chopped parsley, tarragon and chives. That's the tartar sauce they do in France. If you add in the chopped cooked whites of the egg, then it turns miraculously into sauce gibriche!

I thought this might be of interest.

di reston

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Thanks, Di! Good to know what the original inspiration was.
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Old 11-06-2015, 12:32 PM   #33
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Naturally I would not use ALL the ingredients at once. Or maybe I would. My point was all these things and more are suitable for making a tasty tartar sauce.
I also said I like malt vinegar on fried fish. I think malt vinegar is quite easy on the taste buds and it could not over power the fish.
All these things are a preference. My opinion if you will.
Sorry, I had the impression you *were* saying you would add all of these ingredients. Of course, it's all about personal preference, and I enjoy strong flavors. There does come a point when it becomes too much, though.
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Old 11-06-2015, 12:34 PM   #34
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I have a recipe for ginger remoulade I just posted on its own thread. I generally use it with broiled or grilled salmon or tuna rather than fried white fish, but it's a good alternative to tartar sauce.

Ginger Remoulade for Fish
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Old 11-06-2015, 12:49 PM   #35
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Rollbones,

We usually use Paul Prudhomme's remoulade sauce from his LA Kitchen book. Sometimes we'll use Emeril's from the Real and Rustic cookbook too. We've got both books so don't have them typed out. I personally prefer cutting down a bit on the mustard(s) though and adding a little bit more ketchup. It's just too mustardy for me otherwise.
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Old 11-06-2015, 02:17 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Rollbones,

We usually use Paul Prudhomme's remoulade sauce from his LA Kitchen book. Sometimes we'll use Emeril's from the Real and Rustic cookbook too. We've got both books so don't have them typed out. I personally prefer cutting down a bit on the mustard(s) though and adding a little bit more ketchup. It's just too mustardy for me otherwise.
Both of those recipes are available online.

http://jacksonville.com/entertainmen...emoulade-sauce

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/e...e-recipe2.html
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Old 11-07-2015, 12:54 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Sorry, I had the impression you *were* saying you would add all of these ingredients. Of course, it's all about personal preference, and I enjoy strong flavors. There does come a point when it becomes too much, though.
That would be another opinion as "to much" would be up to each individuals taste. Might be just right for one and "to much" or "not enough" for another.
I will check out the recipe you posted for ginger remoulade. Thanks.

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Originally Posted by medtran49 View Post
Rollbones,

We usually use Paul Prudhomme's remoulade sauce from his LA Kitchen book. Sometimes we'll use Emeril's from the Real and Rustic cookbook too. We've got both books so don't have them typed out. I personally prefer cutting down a bit on the mustard(s) though and adding a little bit more ketchup. It's just too mustardy for me otherwise.
Thank You!
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Old 11-07-2015, 01:22 PM   #38
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That would be another opinion as "to much" would be up to each individuals taste. Might be just right for one and "to much" or "not enough" for another.
Well, of course I would think that, even for you, there's a point where it's too much. Or maybe I should send you a bowl of the stuff I concocted when I was about four years old. It had practically everything I could pull out of the cabinet
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Old 11-07-2015, 06:45 PM   #39
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Thanks to all of you who posted recipes!
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Old 11-08-2015, 08:28 AM   #40
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Have you ever tried it? One of the things we almost always had on the table when I was growing up was sliced cucumbers soaked in white vinegar. I loved it, and still do, although now I usually add a splash of cider vinegar and a pinch each of salt, sugar and cayenne.

At the beach house my mother rented for the family, my aunt (her sister) asked me to make it to have with dinner. It's an old family recipe!
I used to do that for the kids as they were growing up. I kept it in the fridge along with celery and carrots sticks in a small jar. Kept the jar right at the front of the shelf so it was always the first thing they saw when they opened the door. Every morning they left for school and I got out the peeler and the veggies to replenish the supply. Very popular in my home.

I started out with keeping them in cold water. But they would grab the salt shaker. When I switched to the cider vinegar and watered down a bit, they stopped using the salt. One way to get veggies into the kiddies.
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