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Old 11-07-2017, 04:31 PM   #1
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What is German mustard?

Whiskadoodle's comment in today's dinner thread reminded me of this question. I remember some years ago, we had a member from Germany - I think her name was Cara? Anyway, one day, someone mentioned they were having German mustard with dinner and she asked what that was. No one answered

I have since learned that different parts of Germany have different traditional mustards, and sometimes more than one. So I'm wondering - what do you consider to be "German" mustard?
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Old 11-07-2017, 04:54 PM   #2
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Never gave it a thought.
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Old 11-07-2017, 05:06 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Never gave it a thought.
Me neither.

I grew up in a German family, and we always had two mustards in the fridge: Woeber, which was a brown spicy mustard that my dad and I liked, and French's yellow, which was the only one my younger brother would eat. My mom didn't like mustard.

Woeber is made in the US, although I think the company itself has some German roots. I'm not 100% sure, though.
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Old 11-08-2017, 06:58 AM   #4
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There are regional mustards in this country which are probably based on mustards that originated from different countries. Although stores around here carry Inglehoffer mustards, I can't find the "Sweet Hot" any more.
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Old 11-08-2017, 07:50 AM   #5
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A quick Google search reaps many sources

Prepared German mustard is made with different varieties of ground mustard seeds (mostly Sinapis hirta and Brassica nigra) mixed with vinegar, oil, herbs and/or sweeteners. It ranges from smooth to coarse-ground, and from pale yellow to brown in color.

https://www.thespruce.com/german-mus...strich-1446951
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Old 11-08-2017, 08:25 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
A quick Google search reaps many sources

Prepared German mustard is made with different varieties of ground mustard seeds (mostly Sinapis hirta and Brassica nigra) mixed with vinegar, oil, herbs and/or sweeteners. It ranges from smooth to coarse-ground, and from pale yellow to brown in color.

https://www.thespruce.com/german-mus...strich-1446951
Thanks, I saw that. My question was more about what people here think of when they think of German mustard. I was wondering if we had different ideas about what it is.

My dad's family is German and he always liked a spicy brown mustard with German sausages.
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Old 11-08-2017, 08:39 AM   #7
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I like Ingelhoffer stone ground mustard. I also like Dusseldorf, it's a sweet hot mustard and good on everything.
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Old 11-08-2017, 11:33 AM   #8
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I like a more spicy mustard. How I discovered German mustard was when it was served at a friend's back yard Bbq. That was a few years ago, and I think I finished my 3rd bottle sometime this summer. It isn't something I use often. I know one bottle I've had was Dusseldorf. Another one I've had is Gulden's spicy brown. Don't know if it's a German mustard, but the flavor is similar. My reference to German mustard, and when I think about what I look for is somewhat spicy yet different from Dijon.

After reading about German mustards after GG asked the question yesterday, I see there are many styles/ regions of mustard, from sweetish to spicy. I am lucky/glad I stumbled across the spicier end of the spectrum.
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Old 11-08-2017, 12:29 PM   #9
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I keep Gulden's spicy brown mustard, Dijon or a variety of and French's yellow..

I have never thought of referring to a mustard as German Mustard..

Ross
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Old 11-08-2017, 02:18 PM   #10
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I ate at a few sausage carts while in Germany many years ago...When I was in Bavaria the mustard was thicker and darker, with spices added..while in the north in Hamburg I remember it being very light, thin and sweet
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