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Old 11-09-2007, 11:50 AM   #1
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Countertop convection oven?

I am considering a countertop convection oven and have narrowed it down to three models that look like the are the same oven but with different badges.
They are the Franklin Chef FR1660, Curina Pro 250-41 and the Haier RTC 1664SS. The specs are all the same, 1700 watts, 1.5 cu. ft. and they all weight the same and have the same dimensions with the exception that the Haier says it has 3 elements and the other two have two, but as the all are rated at 1700 watts I have my reservations about that claim.
My questions are, has anyone had any experience with any of these ovens?
Are countertop ovens worth having and I have read that they are only good for baking and not for roasting? Can anyone shed any light on these or other convections that may be worth looking into.
All three are around the same price with the Franklin the lowest and is sold online by Sams and could be returned to the local Sams if not wanted with no problem.
OR, should I just same my money until I can afford to get a duel fuel range?

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Old 11-10-2007, 07:11 AM   #2
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From wisegeek.com:
Rather than let hot air circulate randomly, convection ovens carefully create a uniform temperature with internal fans that circulate hot air. Convection ovens are larger and more expensive than standard, or radiant, ovens, but they cook food faster, at a lower temperature, and with better results. Fans ensure that the same temperature reaches the top and bottom of foods, as well as foods at all rack levels.
A frequent complaint of cooks with radiant ovens is that bottoms of foods get scorched, while tops are not browned evenly. This is because the temperature is not the same over the course of the cooking time, as well as over the volume of the oven cavity. Convection ovens correct this variation by using a fan that blows the hot air throughout the oven. A "true" or "European" convection oven goes one step further by adding a third heating element. Thus, the fan actually blows pre-heated air, rather than distributing the already-heated air. These are the most expensive and effective types of ovens.
Cooking with a convection oven requires some adjustments, but proves much easier and more rewarding in the long run. Because the heated air transfers heat more efficiently to cooking containers and exposed food surfaces, food will take less time to cook. Most recipes can be cooked for 25% shorter time, which ends up saving energy. Also, you might need to slightly lower the temperature at which food cooks on a trial and error basis.
You'll notice that convection ovens seal in the juices of meat so dishes taste more flavorful and moist. Baked goods, such as pies or cookies, will be perfectly browned, even if you place them on different racks. Pastry will come out better, too, because the heat doesn't fuse flour and butter, but allows it to form flakes. When you're using multiple racks, the food itself won't interfere with the heat that reaches other foods. For all these reasons, convection ovens are no longer reserved for high-end restaurants, but increasingly find themselves in the renovated kitchens of amateur cooks.

The above notwithstanding-
1.5 cubic feet is kinda small
Convection ovens can be usefull for dehydrating foods but tend to dry out reheated baked goods.
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Old 11-10-2007, 08:11 AM   #3
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Quote:
The above notwithstanding-
1.5 cubic feet is kinda small
Convection ovens can be usefull for dehydrating foods but tend to dry out reheated baked goods.
1.5 seems like the largest of the consumer and affordable ovens, and it is small, some countertops are only .5-.9 which is almost useless,
I think I am going to wait awhile and go for a dual fuel with a convection oven.
Thanks for the reply, any suggestion on a dual fuel oven, I want to keep it under $2000 if possible?
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Old 11-10-2007, 08:31 AM   #4
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I'd go with the 1.5 cu foot (18" wide x 12" high x 12" deep?) to see if I liked convection cooking before springing for the big bucks.
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Old 11-10-2007, 08:46 AM   #5
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Good thought, $225 vs $1800 which seems to be the lowest I have found a dual fuel with convection. Have found duel fuel with gas assist oven which only needs 120 vac, can't see operating an oven on 120 but then I may be out of touch with new appliance technology.
I am due for a new stove and dishwasher, both are 15 years old, can get a new gas stove for less than a grand but what the ****, this is going to be the last stove I will ever buy so if I do it I may as well go for broke.
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Old 11-10-2007, 01:12 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysquirrel View Post
Good thought, $225 vs $1800 which seems to be the lowest I have found a dual fuel with convection. Have found duel fuel with gas assist oven which only needs 120 vac, can't see operating an oven on 120 but then I may be out of touch with new appliance technology.
I am due for a new stove and dishwasher, both are 15 years old, can get a new gas stove for less than a grand but what the ****, this is going to be the last stove I will ever buy so if I do it I may as well go for broke.
Since you are due, get the duel ... I just got the convec/conventional Monday and LOVE IT. Make sure you watch the temp settings(25* cooler) and your time is less also. So far everything has come out yummy or as my 3 year old grandson said "radical".
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Old 11-10-2007, 01:21 PM   #7
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Since you are due, get the duel ... I just got the convec/conventional Monday and LOVE IT. Make sure you watch the temp settings(25* cooler) and your time is less also. So far everything has come out yummy or as my 3 year old grandson said "radical".
What brand did you buy?
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Old 11-10-2007, 01:29 PM   #8
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Frigidaire pro series range. Look at web site: Frigidaire Appliances - Home and Kitchen Appliances for your home
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Old 11-10-2007, 06:03 PM   #9
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I have a Sharp countertop convection/microwave combination. My experience with it is that some foods dry out, most take longer to cook and figuring out what height and what program setting to use to cook different foods is a nightmare. I’m donating mine to charity.
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Old 11-15-2007, 06:29 AM   #10
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I have an LG Combo, Microwave, convection, grill and rotisserie oven and I love it!! It is ideal when there is only my husband and myself and I find I can cook all sorts in it as it is quite wide as well as high, but certainly saves me heating up my large gas oven.

I just set the temp identical to what I would if using my regular oven. I have had no probs with food drying out. This is the 2nd combo benchtop microwave/oven that I have had over the last 10 years and wouldn't be without it.
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