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Old 06-25-2011, 05:31 PM   #1
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Dishwasher won't drain - help!

My dishwasher won't drain on any cycle.

I've already tried to make it manually drain itself.
When that didn't work I emptied it myself.

Checked all the filters, drainage holes nothing was blocking them.
So now I'm thinking hoses.
Checked for kinks, leaks anything. They are fine.
The disposal has been working fine. Looks good, no leaks around the seals.

Which hose do I pull out to check for clogs. The one directly leading to the dishwasher. That really long black one. Kinda skinny looking very flexible. Or the disposal hose?

What does "air in the line mean?" Will I see it? ;)

I can't get a repair man out in this area for a month. The warranty has already expired. So I got 2 years if that out of this piece of garbage?.. This isn't the first problem I've had with that dishwasher.

My toolbox is ready..
Thanks.

Munky.
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Old 06-25-2011, 05:42 PM   #2
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You might want to try the vinegar cure discussed elsewhere on this forum.
Perhaps the impeller on your ejector pump is shot.
Also check the hose and check-valve that goes from the machine to your sink's drain pipe.
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Old 06-25-2011, 05:44 PM   #3
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Pull the hose that goes to the disposal unit. That is the drain hose. Unless it's a clear hose, no you will not see any clogs or air in the line, but air in the line shouldn't bother the drain hose. You could try blowing into it but I wouldn't attempt to suck on it for obvious reasons. You could also take the front panel off the dishwasher, disconnect the drain hose and blow through it from that end.

Before you do any of that, can you hear the pump running when you switch to drain? Dishwashers don't drain by gravity, they have a pump. If you don't hear the pump, the problem is electrical , not plumbing.
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Old 06-25-2011, 05:54 PM   #4
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When it's time to drain, an electrical switch somewhere opens a valve so the water can be pumped out. If the switch doesn't open the valve, nothing else matters. I doubt it's a clogged line. More likely the switch.
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Old 06-25-2011, 06:00 PM   #5
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I can definitely hear it humming. Lasts about 5 minutes. With this model they say if you push the cancel button twice it will drain itself. It does store hot water for the next use.

Looked up the model and # online.
Amana under the counter. Model #ADB1500AWW

Should I drain it again before I unhook the hose?

Thank you for the help.
Munky.
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Old 06-25-2011, 06:19 PM   #6
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Today's appliances are not what they used to be. In my salad days a new refridgerator could be expected to last 20 years. Now the appliance repairman tells me that even a high end fridge can only be expected to get about 5 years (Ours got 4 before it needed to be repaired.) I expect that it is the same for dishwashers. It's called planned obsolescence. Look out for the repair bill, you might be better off buying a new unit.
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Old 06-25-2011, 06:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joesfolk View Post
Today's appliances are not what they used to be. In my salad days a new refridgerator could be expected to last 20 years. Now the appliance repairman tells me that even a high end fridge can only be expected to get about 5 years (Ours got 4 before it needed to be repaired.) I expect that it is the same for dishwashers. It's called planned obsolescence. Look out for the repair bill, you might be better off buying a new unit.
Helps to have a supply of 75 - 100 psi compressed air and a variety of blowgun tools.
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Old 06-25-2011, 06:45 PM   #8
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Tried the vinegar trick with ours, it seemed to help for awhile. Pour a couple cups of vinegar on the bottom and let it sit overnight. Then the thing started puddling water on the floor. It was cockeyed in the space. Had it fixed a couple times, then we ended up getting a new one and having the store plumber install it. The last couple we installed ourselves. Major headache.

I agree with "planned obsolescence". So sad that major appliances don't last.
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Old 06-25-2011, 07:00 PM   #9
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I pulled the hose off the disposal unit. That's as far as I can go. To get it all the way out I have to pull the dishwasher out from under the counter. That's too big of a job for me. Today isn't a day for me to play Super Hero.. I lost!

From what I could see in the hose was just a little bit of water. Nothing spilled out or drained into the bucket.

Emptied the washer by hand pump again. It's still backing up. Not much. Just enough to see. I shut the water valve off. My kitchens now closed. HA! vacation :)

Were just going to have to replace it. It was a cheap brand, parts were recalled on it. So this eh' maybe is a good thing. Inconvenient. But good. Next time around THEY can install it.

Munky.
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Old 06-26-2011, 08:47 AM   #10
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When mine did that, it was the pump, and replacing was about the same cost as fixing.

Now my stove--6 years old--won't light, and the repairman says the part to fix it is $200, plus labor. SIX years old!!
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