"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Appliances
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-07-2012, 11:30 AM   #21
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
@PF: Flipping over the filter didn't change anything although I'm sure I would have to do it for months to see if it prevented the side falling over problem.

@TL: I guess my problem with the French press was that I grind my coffee fine... Okay I remember seeing the vacuum coffee makers in coffee shops. By the time I started paying attention they had all switched to drip, because I presume the drip machines take less time and labor to make a pot. I agree that percolator recirculation of already brewed coffee is a big negative. I suspect but can't prove that the coffee gets more bitter the longer you run it.

I have one really big insulated coffee cup (easily two normal cups). I use it as my water measure, filling it to the tippy top and pouring that into the coffee maker. When the coffee is brewed I pour the whole pot right into the coffee cup. The moist grounds soak up just enough that the coffee level in the cup is low enough to not present a spilling danger.
__________________

__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 12:39 PM   #22
Master Chef
 
FrankZ's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Posts: 9,633
I honestly think there is no reason to over think this is you are using a drip maker anyways. Most make a reasonable cup of coffee, but not stellar.

I use my Capresso Ultima for espresso more than anything. After that would be the french press or an ibrik depending on my mood. I have nothing against drip coffee, and I drink a lot of it but not at home. We don't have a drip maker.
__________________

__________________
"First you start with a pound of bologna..."
-My Grandmother on how to make ham salad.
FrankZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 01:00 PM   #23
Sous Chef
 
gadzooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 838
The original problem with basket filters seemed to be that they folded in when they got wet and let grounds into the coffee pot. We had that problem with a Bunn VPR at church, and what I discovered was they were using generic 8-12 c. filters, which are smaller than 12 c. basket filters made for 12 c. brewers like Bunn. Bigger filters solved the problem. I bought the right filters but found I also had to throw away the old, under-sized ones or they would continue to use them and complain. Bunn makes a good electric brewer, and I have a big, two warmer pour over model I use for parties and events. Great coffee, 3 minutes a pot, consistently. I also have a two warmer remote station, so the coffee monster doesn't have to sit on the table. When the economy here started to tank, a lot of small offices, realtors especially, closed, and sold their office stuff. You can get those two warmer Bunn pour overs for < $50 and clean 'em up in a few minutes. Get a de-liming spring and clean the water line, and descale the boiler. It'll last a very long time.
__________________
gadzooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 02:43 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
I don't think I'm over-thinking it. I probably wrote the OP more to vent and get my irritation out of my system. I didn't have anything else to do at the time so writing the OP was a form of entertainment too. Internet forums are fun because you can get several or a dozen opinions about any question you pose and the replies are often interesting.

I was curious if anybody else had any opinion over Melitta vs. Mr. Coffee. It seems there are only (IMO) two important issues: (1) the Mr. Coffee filters sometimes fold over and make a bad brew, and (2) the conical Melitta filters might make a more uniform brew.

I think it's quite possible that Mr. Coffee brand filters might perform better than the generic ones. However the generic Melitta filters work just as good as the brand name ones (IMO).

I like the way drip coffee tastes (prefer it over other methods) and I don't like the Mr. Coffee maker because at least the generic filters don't work so well and sometimes fold and ruin the brew. I'll bide my time and when the moment is right I'll replace the MC with a Melitta style coffee maker perhaps Melitta brand.

Goodwill can find Mr. Coffee a new home.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 02:53 PM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,874
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
The cone filters are usually thicker than the basket filters. Melitta used to advertise that their filters absorb coffee oils and that was one of the reasons Melitta coffee tastes better. Thicker filters might do that better. I have no idea if coffee oils make the coffee not as good. It doesn't seem to be a problem when I use my espresso machine.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 03:22 PM   #26
Sous Chef
 
gadzooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 838
If I were going to go with a coffee maker specifically for the cone filters, I would probably opt for Chemex (I actually already have one) but I would look for Chemex filters as well, as they are thicker and said to be a finer filter than Melitta or generic. They are flat and have to be folded rather than coming with a sealed edge, and I think they would work with a Melitta coffee maker as well.
__________________
gadzooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 03:54 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Thanks TL and GZ.

I've just realized something! I never did quite get it that my Mr. Coffee didn't taste as good as my Melitta coffee when I switched coffee makers. Now that you've pointed it out I've realized that the Melitta filters are thicker than the Mr. Coffee filters. Maybe that does make a difference!

Maybe the thicker filters remove more oils from the brew than the thinner filters. Maybe the thickness has some effect on the flow through rate, although the coffee machine design can be adjusted for optimum flow by the design of the heater mechanism (how fast it spits hot water through the filter basket) and by the size of the basket exit hole (how fast it flows out).

I think the brew is also affected by how much coffee you're making. Of course you add more water and more ground coffee if you want to brew more. And you adjust the coffee:water ratio to get the desired strength. But you're still faced with the fact that the hot water flow rate and basket exit rate are fixed by the design and you can't change it.

What I mean to say is that it's not possible to make exactly the same brewed coffee in any desired quantity (although the differences may be minor). If you double or halve the ingredients the ground coffee will be exposed to hot water for a different amount of time and the coffee-water mixture will be a different depth. I don't know if this effect is significant but it may be.

I recall my old Melitta carafe and conic filter basket that fits on top of the carafe. You insert the filter, add the ground coffee, boil the water, and then you pour it through the top a bit at a time (at least that's the way I did it), just enough to get the ground coffee soaked but not so much that you fill the filter basket. If you do that the ground coffee adheres to the side of the filter and gets left behind: your brewed coffee is weaker and some ground coffee was wasted because it is exposed to the hot water a smaller amount of time. To make it work right you have to pour the boiling water through in stages.

I think that's probably a big difference in drip coffee makers. Somebody already mentioned water temperature. Heater flow rate, depth of coffee+water in the basket, and exit rate affect how the brewed coffee comes out. The quantity you're making probably also affects the quality of coffee. But most importantly of all, I think the water temperature is very important! I just tested my Mr. Coffee and the hot water is about 165. I'm pretty sure that's not hot enough for an optimum cup of coffee.

So I'm still decided that my next coffee maker will be either a Melitta or at least one of the other brands that uses Melitta style filters.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 03:59 PM   #28
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,351
As I recall, water should be at a minimum of 195 F for optimum brewing. That's the primary reason I bought mine. In a Consumer Reports test, it was the only one that reached that temp. It actually has a switch on it which you activate when brewing smaller amounts of coffee that preheats the water before the brewing begins to ensure proper water temp.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 04:13 PM   #29
Sous Chef
 
gadzooks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 838
Thanks for this thread. As a result, I dug out my old Chemex CN4. Makes 2-12 cups, and I'm going to order some filters, probably the square ones. Easier to remove from the carafe. If I recall, since they are folded, there is enough paper to fold some in over the grounds so they don't float and get wasted.
__________________
gadzooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-07-2012, 04:16 PM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,874
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I seem to remember that Melitta used to make regular and fast filters.
__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
coffee

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.