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Old 12-17-2007, 12:56 PM   #1
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Fondue, Electric Vs Gel Burner

I'm throwing a fondue party, first time ever using a fondue...I'm doing chicken, and beef, and veggies....I am going to buy two fondue's, if money were no object which should I buy, the electric or the gel burner ones?

I'd like to know the pro's and con's of each...how slow is the gel burner fondue in actually cooking the meat? Also, how fast does it lose temperature with the gel burner? Does the electric fondue cook faster, or at the same rate? How long can I expect a skewer of beef to cook to medium? Is there anything I should know before buying the fondue, best type of pot, brands to stay away from, etc.

Any advice, input, is greatly appreciated here....

Mac

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Old 12-17-2007, 01:26 PM   #2
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since it sounds very much like you`re making shabu shabu (a type of Sukiyaki), I`de say use an Electric heater, you can maintain an even temp, there`s no mess or consumables and it costs less in the long run.

as for cooking time as long as your stock is up to boiling temp it takes only Seconds to cook (if your meat is cut correctly).
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Old 12-17-2007, 01:32 PM   #3
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How Long?

Thanks, your input is much appreciated

Any idea how long it takes to bring the broth to a boiling temperature using the electric fondue?? I don't know what the temperature control on the fondue itself means, it starts at 1 and goes to 5, I'm assuming 1 is low and 5 is high, but what does that translate to in terms of heat degrees??

Mac
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Old 12-17-2007, 01:42 PM   #4
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You would heat the broth on the stove and pour it into the fondue pot already hot.
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Old 12-17-2007, 01:49 PM   #5
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Yikes

Not sure I like that idea, sounds like way too much work, I didn't realize I'd have to prep stuff for a fondue, the whole reason why i chose to do a fondue party as to a dinner party was so I wouldn't have much prep to do.....I thought it was just a simple matter of filling the fondue pots with broth, having the meat an dveggies precut, lighting the burner or plugging the units in and turning them on, and way to go.....someone sent me an email saying I'd need to par-cook things beforehand, and now I hear I have to preheat the broth, yikes, this sounds like too much prep.....thinking maybe I should reconsider this idea....

Thanks for your input

Mac
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Old 12-17-2007, 02:15 PM   #6
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If you think heating up some broth in a pot is to much prep, perhaps you should go another way.

I don't know how long it would take to bring room temperature or fridge temperature broth to boiling in the pot. I guess eventually it would get there. Preheating it just makes it much faster.
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Old 12-17-2007, 02:41 PM   #7
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Prep

As per my previous post....
Heating up broth on the stove is not too much prep, but combine that with having to par-cook food beforehand, etc and it becomes no different than cooking an entire meal from scratch, and defeats the purpose of why Ii had planned to do a fondue to begin with....

I'm getting a lot of conflicting information from different people, some people are saying, "Why would you par-cook food before a fondue, never had to do that before", others have said, "You have to par-cook food before a fondue otherwsie it will never cook", you said, "heat up the broth on the stove beforehand", someone else emailed me and said, "The purpose of a fondue is so you don't have to cook, everyone cooks their own, you don't need to preheat anything, the fondue will do it all.."

What am I to believe?

I think my best bet is to find an experienced and reliable source of information before making any decisions.....

Mac
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Old 12-17-2007, 03:11 PM   #8
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As I said in an earlier post, preheating the broth on the stove will speed things up considerably. I didn't say it could not be done in the pot. It will just take longer. What do the instructions for the fondue pot say? Instructions usually come with a recipe or two. Follow those.
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Old 12-17-2007, 04:25 PM   #9
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It depends on what you are serving. Some things need to be parboiled, (some veggies for example) others don't need to be (meat). In fact it's dangerous from a food safety standpoint to parcook meat. A shrimp will take but a minute or so to cook in boiling broth whereas a potato would take a lot longer.

Bringing the broth to a boil on the stove is hardly much effort, really.

The point of fondue is not to rid yourself of work, it's the unique and communal quality of a fondue pot.

You could just make cheese fondue, whioch requires a small modicum of up from prep of the cheese, but then is basically autopilot afterwards.
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Old 12-17-2007, 04:51 PM   #10
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I have an electric fondue pot and I love it. It doesn't take long at all to get oil or broth hot, and it maintains the heat. The best part is you don't have to preheat the broth, just put it in and plug it in. I have this one and love it (although I got it on sale at Target for half that price).
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