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Old 07-19-2016, 08:10 PM   #1
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ISO good electric kettle

The gas in my building has been shut off and I need an electric kettle for boiling water. I tried boiling water on two different types of portable electric burners, but it took waaaay too long. I would like a recommendation for a reasonably priced electric kettle, preferably one that is easy to clean and has safety features. I need it soon...help!

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Old 07-20-2016, 12:10 AM   #2
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How much water are you trying to heat at one time? If it's just enough for a cup of tea, I know from personal experience that many kettles heat more than needed. I had a nice Hamilton Beach one, but the minimum amount of water you could heat in the kettle was about 1 1/4 quart. Um, my teacup holds 14 ounces max. I was dumping way too much water to make it worth using. That was a few years ago, though, so smaller kettles might now be on the market. I have an electric stove, so I went back to using a stove-top type.

Ages ago I had a coil-like immersion heater. You would put it into your cup of water, plug it in, and wait a couple minutes for the water to come to a boil. That might be an option.
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Old 07-20-2016, 12:20 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
How much water are you trying to heat at one time? If it's just enough for a cup of tea, I know from personal experience that many kettles heat more than needed. I had a nice Hamilton Beach one, but the minimum amount of water you could heat in the kettle was about 1 1/4 quart. Um, my teacup holds 14 ounces max. I was dumping way too much water to make it worth using. That was a few years ago, though, so smaller kettles might now be on the market. I have an electric stove, so I went back to using a stove-top type.

Ages ago I had a coil-like immersion heater. You would put it into your cup of water, plug it in, and wait a couple minutes for the water to come to a boil. That might be an option.
Oh I forgot about my immersion heater! That's a good option for one cup of tea, but if I'm having guests it wouldn't be. Maybe I need to get a kettle that would heat faster on an electric burner. I have this one but it heats very slowly and is rusting inside.

Calphalon Enameled Steel 2-Quart Tea Kettle in Apple Green - BedBathandBeyond.com

A lot of articles I've read say that electric kettles heat water faster.
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Old 07-20-2016, 12:31 AM   #4
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The electric one might heat a wee bit faster, but I'm a purist when it comes to fresh water when making tea. I would heat that 1 quart-plus in the electric kettle, then pour more than half out after filling my cup. My best use for it? To boil water in the basement when I had to do a thorough hot-water-and Oxyclean cleaning of my front-load washer.

I bought an OXO brushed stainless kettle over a year ago and love it. It holds just over 1 1/2 quarts, which is still plenty if I'm making a big pitcher of brewed tea for ice tea. It's comfortable to handle, too. The lid removes completely, so I take it off each time I use the kettle so that the inside dries, even though it's stainless steel. Got it at BedBugs-andBeyond, too, so there's that 20% off coupon thing going for it.

If your stove is not a glass-top, you could consider a Revere kettle. I had one for years, loved it, but when I got my glass-top stove it wasn't as efficient because the base of the kettle is a wee bit above the surface of the stovetop - the rim that holds the copper base to the stainless kettle won't let the base touch the surface for optimum heating. I gave the kettle to our daughter, who has a gas stove, and use it every time we go to visit our kids and stay with her.
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Old 07-20-2016, 04:32 AM   #5
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Does this mean you will no longer have a conventional stovetop?

If you do have a stovetop I would use a saucepan for the time being, until you find a great pot at a great price.

If you have a microwave you could use that in a pinch.

I had good luck with a Hotshot for one or two cups at a time. I got rid of it when I moved into my current apartment.

https://www.google.com/#tbm=shop&q=s...64725487733918

These days I use a small Revere whistling tea kettle on the stovetop.

Good luck!
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Old 07-20-2016, 05:09 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by kitchengoddess8 View Post
I have this one but it heats very slowly and is rusting inside.

Calphalon Enameled Steel 2-Quart Tea Kettle in Apple Green - BedBathandBeyond.com
Are you sure it is rust?

Teakettles tend to develop a mineral scale inside.

The scale can be reduced or removed by boiling a mixture made of equal parts water and white vinegar. Fill the teakettle with the diluted vinegar bring it to a boil and let it sit overnight. You will need to rinse the teakettle and may need to boil one or two pots of water to remove any lingering traces of the vinegar.

My grandmother always kept a glass marble in the teakettle to help reduce the mineral buildup, not sure if it did any good!
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Old 07-20-2016, 09:05 AM   #7
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Are you sure it is rust?

Teakettles tend to develop a mineral scale inside.

The scale can be reduced or removed by boiling a mixture made of equal parts water and white vinegar. Fill the teakettle with the diluted vinegar bring it to a boil and let it sit overnight. You will need to rinse the teakettle and may need to boil one or two pots of water to remove any lingering traces of the vinegar.

My grandmother always kept a glass marble in the teakettle to help reduce the mineral buildup, not sure if it did any good!
Yes it's rust and the inside is pitting. I definitely need something new. It's uncertain how long the gas will be off.
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Old 07-20-2016, 09:42 AM   #8
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SO wanted an electric kettle a while ago and got an inexpensive stainless steel one. It sits on a plate that's plugged in so you can lift it off for service. It was amazingly fast in boiling water.
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Old 07-20-2016, 10:14 AM   #9
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SO wanted an electric kettle a while ago and got an inexpensive stainless steel one. It sits on a plate that's plugged in so you can lift it off for service. It was amazingly fast in boiling water.
That's what I was thinking of getting. Which one do you have?
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Old 07-20-2016, 10:20 AM   #10
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Does this mean you will no longer have a conventional stovetop?

If you do have a stovetop I would use a saucepan for the time being, until you find a great pot at a great price.
A saucepan is unfortunately not a good option. I tried boiling water in my 1.5 quart Calphalon sauce pan with a lid and it took almost 10 minutes. Plus it was hard to pour the water safely into a tall mug.
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