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Old 06-10-2012, 04:41 PM   #1
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KA 7 Quart 'Commercial' Model- Progress Report

KA's RVSA instructions recommend operation at speed #4 and to stiffen cheeses prior to grating by partial freezing.
I wanted finely grated Locatelli Pecorino for use in my cheese shaker dispensers / applicators. Due to concerns about condensation from high humidity, I brought the cheese to room temperature before unwrapping and rind trimming. To achieve the desired fine particle size and avoid coarser particles which jam my cheese shakers, I had to slowly feed the cheese through the rotary grater. As a result, it took 1/2 hour to grate 1 pound of cheese. The 1/2 hour of operation raised the rear end of the KA motor housing's temperature to about 125*F.

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Old 06-10-2012, 04:52 PM   #2
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that doesn't sound good, even though I did not completely understand what you were doing.
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Old 06-10-2012, 04:55 PM   #3
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I helped a friend grate a pound of Parmesan a few weeks back. I cut it up into chunks and fed them into her food processor (typical model you find in most kitchens) and the whole job took about 10 minutes. Final consistency was same as you find in pre-grated cheese sold at markets.

A half hour seems a bit excessive to me. Why so much time?
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:02 PM   #4
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that doesn't sound good, even though I did not completely understand what you were doing.
My 50 year old machine gets hotter more quickly.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:04 PM   #5
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125 F is not that much hotter than body temp. I wouldn't be concerned.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:10 PM   #6
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125 F is not that much hotter than body temp. I wouldn't be concerned.
Andy M--you have a fever, take some tylenol and an ice bath.

What IS a temperature that an appliance rises to, that is a sign the appliance should be turned off and let it rest? (I use my blender a lot.)
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:18 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
I helped a friend grate a pound of Parmesan a few weeks back. I cut it up into chunks and fed them into her food processor (typical model you find in most kitchens) and the whole job took about 10 minutes. Final consistency was same as you find in pre-grated cheese sold at markets.

A half hour seems a bit excessive to me. Why so much time?
I do not know about Parmesan, but Parmigiano Reggiano is often available in a form that is often harder than Locatelli Pecorino Romano. Harder cheeses are easier to finely grate more rapidly.
I imagine food processor disks rotate at a much higher RPM than a drum grater at speed 4 (200 RPM?) on a KA.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:18 PM   #8
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If it's uncomfortably warm to your touch that's when you should turn it off.

I hear about this happening all the time with people who over-use their stick blenders. They just keep going until the stick blender quits working.

Most appliances like this (e.g. stick blenders, hair blowers) have what is called a thermal fuse inside them. It's designed to melt or cut out when the internal temperature of the appliance reaches an unsafe temperature. Unfortunately they do not reset and are not user replaceable, so when one goes it generally means the appliance is ruined.

If it's hot to the touch turn it off and let it rest until it's cool before turning it back on.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:20 PM   #9
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125 F is not that much hotter than body temp. I wouldn't be concerned.
Agreed. That was sorta my point.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:22 PM   #10
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I do not know about Parmesan, but Parmigiano Reggiano is often available in a form that is often harder than Locatelli Pecorino Romano. Harder cheeses are easier to finely grate more rapidly.
I imagine food processor disks rotate at a much higher RPM than a drum grater at speed 4 (200 RPM?) on a KA.
The cheese I grated was Parmesano purchased at Costco. That's all I was told.

I imagine the food processor was faster than 200 RPM but I wouldn't think a lot faster.

I wonder if an ordinary food processor might be a more suitable tool than the KA for this job. The FP certainly got the job done quicker and probably with less labor.
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