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Old 03-11-2011, 10:23 AM   #11
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If something were to stop the beater from turning the electric motor should draw more and more current until a proper OCD trips. This is likely to be in the basement and the biggest issue should be me finding a flashlight so I don't kill myself tripping over the rake that will magically appear on the floor when the power is cut, tricky thing those rakes.

What really should happen is the mixer itself should have a thermal cutout. This would protect everything and aren't expensive. When the motor starts to draw too much current to overcome a blockage the temperature should rise fairly quickly.


Have a sacrificial gear in the mixer is an astonishingly bad way to overcome the proper way of dealing with the issue. Nylon gears will just wear, regardless of a blockage or not. Then they slip or strip when working a stiff dough and need replacing from normal usage.

In the end the design should be to protect itself, not to fail.
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Old 03-11-2011, 02:58 PM   #12
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My DH has a machine shop. He has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and has made parts for all kinds of things (a hopper for extracting liquid from soy beans to make soy bean milk, a roofing nailer prototype...etc). Goodweed--he could fix your blower/fan but you're too far away to make that offer. He's also made new parts to replace broken parts for our washers, dryers, dishwashers, furnaces, snowblowers, lawn tractors, food processors (I think he is the only person I know who sharpens the food processor blade...) etc. Is it a small wonder I don't get new appliances <g>. But, I don't have a stand mixer...so he can't "fix" it <g>. What I am thinking is that he could disassemble the KA and make SS parts for all the plastic parts...hmmmmmmmmm....
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Old 03-11-2011, 03:03 PM   #13
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Or just get one of them that lists all metal gears.

Then you don't have the mad scientist thing happening.

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Old 03-11-2011, 03:53 PM   #14
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Classic Series mixers have not changed since solid state speed controls were introduced in 1980 so they have no motor protection. Non-metallic gears have been used in these mixers since at least 1940. Early ones had a worm gear made out of Bakelite and
canvas with the change to strengthened Nylon coming in the 1970’s.

KitchenAid’s reputation was built on the performance of mixers that were equipped with “plastic gears”. Contrary to information found on the web, it is not a recent development,

It would be nice if all metal gears and the temperature cut-off switch made the Professional 600 invulnerable and immortal, but a dedicated mixologist can put one down for the count long before the temperature sensor can do its thing. Professional 600’s are also creative in finding interesting ways to break. A drive train failure can manifest itself in anything form stripped worm gears to the planetary falling off because the press fitting to center shaft was twisted loose.. You just never know until you look.
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Old 03-11-2011, 04:15 PM   #15
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It is hard to know when shopping "on line" what the gears are, etc. I am hesitant to spend that kind of money and buy something that has inferior gears...but then, the old one I had had "non-metal" gears. Unfortunately, DH wasn't around then to rebuilt it.
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Old 03-11-2011, 04:17 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post
Or just get one of them that lists all metal gears.

Then you don't have the mad scientist thing happening.

Well, "the mad scientist" retired at the age of 38...has designed and built a band-saw sawmill, forge, cupela (sp), put back together a 1953 tractor (including rebuilding all the motor parts), another 1963 tractor, and is now building a "bucket front-loader" for the 1953 tractor. If it can be done, he can build it...don't you hate people like that
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Old 03-11-2011, 05:42 PM   #17
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Perhaps KA should adopt the protection measures utilized on the propeller shafts of outboard motors (friction clutch or user replaceable shear pins)?
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Old 03-11-2011, 09:23 PM   #18
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I hate shear pins... ugh...
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Old 03-13-2011, 04:29 PM   #19
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You might also see if Hobart makes anything for the home kitchen. I see a lot of their products in professional kitchens.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
The Hobart N50 is the model Hobart advertises for home and light commercial use.

It is a great 5 qt all around mixer and as durable as heck as long as you remember NOT to change speeds without allowing the motor to come to a dead stop first.

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Old 03-13-2011, 04:39 PM   #20
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If I remember correctly the price on those was fairly substantial compared to the KA as well.
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