"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Appliances
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-17-2005, 08:43 PM   #31
Senior Cook
 
SpiceUmUp's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: The bustling metropolis of Butler NJ
Posts: 276
Send a message via AIM to SpiceUmUp
Tell ya what; we have gotten off on the wrong foot here.

Let's call a truce.

I like Ka mixers and find them to be rugged and well made. As a plastics engineer, I am not bothered by the cover on the gear box being made of plastic as some plastics, particularly injection molded vs. cast zinc, can be stronger and exhibit greater durability than metal. They are also less expensive to make, more repeatable in quality, and less variable in dimensions

I think that given the fact that KA makes better than a million mixers per year, the number of issues involved is not so significant. If 60,000 units were returned to KA for repair (and I doubt it is that high) that would still account for about 6%.
Even if it only cost KA $10 for every repair, that would be a cost to them of $600,000 and I doubt that Whirlpool Corp would tolerate that sort of loss.

I do know this; the customer that has a problem is more likely to make their issues known than the customer that has no problems.

I also disagree that this is a SERIOUS matter. It is a matter of some concern if you have a mixer that fails, but a serious matter? It does not pose a safety risk. Even if the gear box cover failed explosively (nearly impossible), it would be contained by the outer shell.

KA stands behind their mixers. If it does fail, an unlikely occurrence based on my experience, KA is there to help.

KA sells a million mixers a year. This alone gives an indication that the problems can not be as widespread as some seem to think it is.

I have had other heavy duty mixers including 2 Kenwood’s (now DeLonghi). The first unit was and is great and I still use it from time to time. The second unit burned up the first time it was used.

I saw that someone posted a problem with their Viking Mixer (made by Kenwood). They went to the KA.

Given the much lower sales on those mixers, I would think the failure rate of the Kenwood/DeLonghi/Viking mixers is at best, equal to the KA.

In my experience as a member of this board and the KA forum (the most honestly run company forum I have seen) there is a fairly wide range of reasons for failure. Certainly with the larger machine, there is some concern with the gear noise. Rarely do I see issues concerning the gearbox failing. Not never, just rarely.

I put my mixers under a great deal of stress. I grind meat; I mix large batches of very stiff dough and no failures.

But it is obvious we disagree on this so let's agree to disagree like gentlemen and leave it at that.
__________________

__________________
Where you are is where you belong, it is where you are going that you can change
SpiceUmUp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2005, 08:58 PM   #32
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
Ok, I'm willing to put this issue to rest.

I'm sorry if it sounded to you like I was attacking you personally. I really wasn't. It is a growing concern though when a company makes a product that compromises quality over quantity.

But in all of the restaurants, colleges, universities and corporate catering kitchens that I worked in, I've used just about every K'Aid & Hobart mixer possible, large and small. Much like yourself.


~Corey123.
__________________

__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 02:09 PM   #33
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 14
KitchenAid quality

I'll add to this discussion. I work for KitchenAid, and I can attest that we have not "chosen" to cheapen our product. In the past 3 years that I have managed this product line as the Marketing Manager, I have ADDED cost and improved quality to every mixer in our line. I'll take this opportunity to also announce that we will begin manufacturing our Pro 600 model with an all-metal transmission COVER in early 2006. By the end of the year, ALL bowl lift models will exhibit this new metal cover. This will impact very few of our customers (less than 2%), but for those very heavy users, they will see an improvement in durability under heavy loads.

Verne Myers
__________________
Mixerman47 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2005, 06:16 PM   #34
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
Great!

I'm happy for that.


~Corey123.
__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2006, 09:45 PM   #35
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Pittsburgh PA
Posts: 25
Question...since we are talking about KitchenAid mixers...while doing my Christmas baking I had an unusual occurrence with my mixer. The shaft to which the attachments are placed developed some black grease on it. This I discovered after whatever it was dripped into my pumpkin pie filling. My husband doesn't think it was grease...but, I cleaned it off the shaft and it was black and grease like. I haven't used it since it ruined my filling. Any opinions? Any advice??
__________________
Lyn221 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2006, 04:10 AM   #36
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
Thumbs down

So sorry to hear that your pumpkin pie filling got ruined.

But I've never had that problem.


~Corey123.
__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2006, 08:25 AM   #37
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 375
Ok, having just spent what I consider to be a load of money on a brand new Pro 600 (575 watt) model to replace my smaller 325 watt entry level model (the one beneath artisan) I am a little disturbed by some of these comments.

Just a question: like my previous mixer, my new mixer says that I should not mix with the dough hook at greater than level 2 speed. But I cannot be limited to such a slow speed, as I need a very high speed to make brioche, which must be mixed with the hook at high speed until it is silky and cleans the bowl, (as Pierre Herme demands) which usually takes up to 15 minutes, even at top speed. That ain't gonna happen with level 2 speed! (at least, it doesn't seem likely, although perhaps someone more experienced can correct me if I'm wrong).

I used to ignore the rules with my weaker stand mixer, and always felt I was taking a big risk, even though it never failed (but **** did it heat up and start moving around on the counter). But I thought those days were over, now that I had a high end powerhouse. Does this mean that I am risking failure with my pro 600 if I do this? If the top of the line model can't do this safely, then what the **** can? (don't tell me a Hobarts can; those are off the market, so clearly not an option for most people)

I haven't used my pro 600 once yet, but since I bake every weekend, its maiden voyage is soon upon me. I was hoping to start with a tarte tropizienne. And that takes brioche. Lots of brioche.
__________________
jasonr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2006, 11:34 AM   #38
Executive Chef
 
Corey123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: East Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,881
Keep your older K'Aid mixer for that. I hope you didn't get rid of it or give it away. Since you said that mixer didn't bat an eyelash with the high-speed mixing of the brioche dough.

I wouldn't be so tempted to try it with the Pro 600 yet. You might want to just do normal mixing for a while to see how it holds up first. An undue strain like that may break the machine!

Are you starting off with the dough as a batter first and then adding the flour as you go along? I've never made brioche before, so I'm trying to find out the mixing details.

And yes, ALL K'Aid mixers' instructions suggest using Speed 2 for dough, including mine. I've successfully made dough with mine, but I've never gone above Speed 2 with it for that.

The mixer needs at least 8 to 10 minutes of mixing to get the dough silky-smooth and elastic. I'm afraid that if I turn it up higther than that, it might burn out the motor, something that I can't afford to have happen. Even though it IS almost 20 years old.


~Corey123.
__________________
Corey123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2006, 01:33 PM   #39
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3
Verne/Mixerman47,

Is there a way to tell by the serial # if the Pro 600 has the metal cover? I have 1 coming in (hopefully) and was wondering if there is a way to tell. Also, since this is a known problem, what's KitchenAid's policy on this? Do I have to use it & have something go wrong first to have it replaced with the updated 600 w/metal cover or can it be replaced immediately?

Also, is this the 620 model? I saw a 620 advertised on someone's site.

Thanks for your reply.
__________________
matermark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2006, 07:04 PM   #40
Senior Cook
 
SpiceUmUp's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: The bustling metropolis of Butler NJ
Posts: 276
Send a message via AIM to SpiceUmUp
FYI:

Delonghi, Viking, Kenwood, etc: all limit yeast dough to the number 2 setting on the mixer and warn against using any speed higher as it may damage the mixer. In my search of mixers today I did not find a single mixer for the home that recomends anything over speed 2 for mixing doughs

All KA mixers as far back as I can search have limited yeast dough to the number 2 setting.

The older KA mixers had a nylon gear designed to fail if the mixer was over loaded.

The KA/Hobart mixers had the same gear.

Hobart used some sort of composite or plastic gears going back to the 1930's.

The newer mixers, like the KA Pro 600 have a thermal overload that will stop the motor if it begins to overheat. This protects the gears and the user.

I have never made brioche so I can not say if the number 2 setting will do the trick, but the number 2 setting is roughly equivlent to the speed the professional hobarts use to mixe yeast dough.

I bake breads very nearly every single weekend. I get a wonderful smooth dough in 4-5 minutes at the number two setting.

I have kneaded doughs for as long as ten minutes without once overheating the mixer. It is not recomended but with small batches, not more than 6 cups of flour and two cups of water, it does not seem to strain the mixer one iota.
__________________

__________________
Where you are is where you belong, it is where you are going that you can change
SpiceUmUp is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Favorite Helpful Kitchen Hints norgeskog General Cooking 62 08-30-2008 03:38 PM
Kitchen Gadgets...Yes or No? maws Cookware and Accessories 17 05-03-2006 09:55 AM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.