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Old 12-30-2006, 04:13 PM   #1
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Angry KitchenAid Let Down


Has anyone else experienced this?
I asked for and got a KitchenAid Pro 5 for Christmas. It claimed 12 cups of flour power! Yesterday I made bread. I just couldn't wait. I was preparing 2 loaves - a 3 pounder and a 1 1/2 pound loaf. The recipe called for 4 1/2 cups Bread flour and 4 1/2 cups All purpose flour ( between the preferment and final dough). That's 9 cups of flour.

I began the mixing process and within a minute the mixer stalled. I'd wait for it to reset to start it up again and it would stall within seconds. I repeated this process a number of times and finally pulled the dough out and kneaded by hand.

Today I called KitchenAid to ask if there was an issue and was told it would handle 12 cups of White All Purpose flour as used in the recipes in the book that come with the mixer. Otherwise the 12 cup Flour Power mixer would only handle 6 cups of specialty flour! What is Specialty Flour? Any flour that is not White All Purpose flour as used in the book that comes with the mixer.... And you don't get the book until you buy the mixer.

I was told that right on the box it says 6 3/4 one-pound Basic White Bread Loaves*. Well to me basic white bread is what I made. Only flour, salt, yeast and water. On the box it also says "Flour Power indicates the maximum amount of all-purpose flour a stand mixer can mix effectively." Great, I bought mine online and never saw the box.

This is the link to KitchenAid's page for my mixer http://www.kitchenaid.com/catalog/product.jsp?src=Stand+Mixers&cat=310&prod=487
Click on the 6 of 6 Loaves and look under the 12 cup column. Would expect the mixer to handle 12 cups of Bread Flour? Would you expect it wouldn't?

I find their marketing to be deceptive and purposely vague. And by the way, I found nothing in the book that said mine would only do 6 cups of flour other than All-Purpose. Beware, if you have been thinking of a KitchenAid mixer and you use anything other than AP flour, CUT THE FLOUR POWER IN HALF.

If you feel KitchenAid is misleading the consumer send an email through their system at http://www.kitchenaid.com/custserv/contact_form.jsp

Thanks, and let me know if you have experienced this lower capacity.

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Old 12-30-2006, 04:15 PM   #2
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I'm sorry CoC - you must be dissappointed.
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Old 12-30-2006, 05:51 PM   #3
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It's unfortunate and infuriating that you have come up against this issue after the fact. The KA info is not specific enough. You would expect to be using bread flour to make bread.

If you had been ab le to read the box in a store, would that have raised enough of a question in your mind to make a phone call?
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Old 12-30-2006, 05:52 PM   #4
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Yes, I would have had the same expectations as you did. And I would have been crushed. Can you send it back and get a more powerful one?

I love my KA mixer. I have a Professional 6, but I've never made bread dough in it. I do make a TON of cookie dough in it, all at once, but I've always used AP flour.

I have never used bread flour, so don't know what the difference is.

Also, what is "preferment"?
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Old 12-30-2006, 11:20 PM   #5
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Box Info

Andy
Being the typical consumer I don't think the info on the box would have implied enough doubt that I would have researched it futher. "After the fact" research didn't turn up anything on the net. I do wonder what a phone call to KA as a potential buyer would turn up.

Bread Flour doesn't weigh twice that of the same measure of AP flour. They are very similar in weight to volume ratios. I would suspect it would be the higher ratio of water used in artisan bread recipes then the flour itself. Could that be?
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Old 12-30-2006, 11:42 PM   #6
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Bread flour is a higher protein flour that produces more gluten in the dough than AP flour. Gluten is what makes breads chewier and tougher. As a result, there would be a good deal more resistence to the dough hook and motor.
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Old 12-30-2006, 11:52 PM   #7
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In my conversation with KA they told me none of their mixers would handle 12 cups of bread flour. It was odd that after asking why my new mixer wouldn't handle 9 cups of flour when it was advertised it would handle 12 and being told it would only handle 6 cups of bread flour - less than 0ne minute into the conversation - I was offered a replacement of the same mixer. Will it do 12 cups of bread flour? I asked. No, only 6. was the reply.

After pressing for one that would handle 12 cups of bread flour they finally offered to buy it back. I told them it wasn't good enough. That was the end of our conversation.

About Pre-ferments.
They are basically bread doughs that have a long rise in a very cool environment - fridge - that allow for flavor and texture development. Usually made the day before the pre-fermented dough is added to the dough being mixed on baking day. The come in two forms - dry and wet. Don't confuse them with sourdough starter.

Hope that helps
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Old 12-30-2006, 11:57 PM   #8
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CoC, I own that same mixer and am very satisfied with it but I have to say that I think you are right in calling the linked page misleading.

The whole "flour power" concept probably sounded pretty good to some marketing guy who has never made a loaf of bread.
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Old 12-31-2006, 12:02 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Bread flour is a higher protein flour that produces more gluten in the dough than AP flour. Gluten is what makes breads chewier and tougher. As a result, there would be a good deal more resistence to the dough hook and motor.
Thanks Andy,
Yes, I can see that. I guess any gluten building additives would do the same to AP flour also.

It looks as if I'm going to have to do dough for my larger loaves in stages.
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Old 12-31-2006, 12:06 AM   #10
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Yes, I agree with that!

Have you done bread flour dough in yours and ,if so, how large a load?
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