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Old 08-14-2015, 12:10 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Propane is expensive and must be delivered. If its your only choice and you must have gas, go for it. Nice looking tank sitting outside too!
If it was me and only electric was available, I would stick with electric.

A proven inexpensive electric range. You proved what many have been saying over the years.
"High priced, un-tested appliances are not in your best interest"
Buy something thats priced fair and has been in production for some time. This enables the manufacturer to work out any issues.
Better they work them out than the consumer.

Good Luck on whatever you choose. We had a similar decision to make regarding our heating and cooling. Turns out, the decision to go electric was less up front money and lower monthly utility cost.
Propane is expensive.
Actually the tanks can be buried. That's how we had it on the island - just the fill valve and meter stuck up out of the ground.

It's not that expensive - every farm out here in wheat and corn country uses LP gas. We paid about $400 for a tank fill that would last us about a year (About $33 per month, and that was in the Bahamas where the prices for gas imported by freighter were significantly higher than here). However, we only used it for cooking. No need for home heating there, and the water heater was electric (which wasn't that cheap either, as the generators at the power station ran on diesel, also imported).
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Old 08-14-2015, 12:42 PM   #12
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RP, whether you can bury that tank or not depends on town/county/state regulations. They have to be above ground by us.
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Old 08-14-2015, 02:40 PM   #13
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I would not go back to electric for love or money.

used both LP and natural. LP is a bit hotter - but that's why they put knobs on the front.....

in NJ we had a buried LP tank. the EPA classifies them as UST (Underground Storage Tank) and as some terrible opportunity to pollute. yeah yeah yeah, it's a gas and 'goes away' - but we're talking about government morons here....

because it was such a pollution danger, the tank remained the property of the LP gas supplier and that meant we could not shop around for LP gas. we had to buy it from the tank owner and that was the end of that story. budget beware.....

my advise, don't bury anything. plant a big bush. get two tanks. the one always runs out at 10AM on Thanksgiving Day....

the cost to install LP gas lines is seriously affected by local codes. here the nat. gas is black iron piped to a manifold and flexible lines used to feed cooktop/water heater/furnace. in my parents house (DE) they could run copper tubing to the stove. hard black iron pipe end to end is the most expensive option.
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Old 08-14-2015, 03:05 PM   #14
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my advise, don't bury anything. plant a big bush. get two tanks. the one always runs out at 10AM on Thanksgiving Day....
Or you could check the gauge now and then and get it filled before it becomes critical.
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Old 08-14-2015, 03:57 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
Or you could check the gauge now and then and get it filled before it becomes critical.
That never works.
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Old 08-14-2015, 05:19 PM   #16
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Lots of good comments here. :)

A wall oven is not an option - we just don;t have the space. When we remodeled a few years ago we actually removed a wall oven in favor of a range and reclaimed so much good counter space and upper cabinet space with this choice that I could never go back.

The current range has a lovely convection oven - I loved the thing. But now faced with yet another repair, it seems like throwing good money after bad.

Does anyone have experience with a propane oven? Are there some that are self cleaning?
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Old 08-14-2015, 06:34 PM   #17
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...Does anyone have experience with a propane oven? Are there some that are self cleaning?
If the stove itself has a self cleaning feature, you're all set. Once it's set up to handle propane instead of natural gas, all the stove's features should work fine.

I have a gas (not propane) stove with a SC oven and love the ease of cleaning.
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Old 08-14-2015, 08:16 PM   #18
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Lots of good comments here. :)

A wall oven is not an option - we just don;t have the space. When we remodeled a few years ago we actually removed a wall oven in favor of a range and reclaimed so much good counter space and upper cabinet space with this choice that I could never go back.

The current range has a lovely convection oven - I loved the thing. But now faced with yet another repair, it seems like throwing good money after bad.

Does anyone have experience with a propane oven? Are there some that are self cleaning?
Our LP gas range was selfcleaning - worked just a good as any electric range we've had.
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Old 08-15-2015, 05:12 AM   #19
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A couple of comments:

We have a 100 gallon tank for the cooktop and fireplace. We probably don't use the fireplace more than 20 hours per year, and I don't think we use the 100 gallons in a year. I have them fill the tank in late November before the snow comes, as the tank is in a location that is not easy to get to in the winter. They usually show up in the spring to fill again. Memory says that it was only 25 or 30 gallons this spring.

I know some people who purchase their own tanks and then shop around for price, but that's for heating. I think that most have the tank rental included in their supply agreement. We pay a lot for a gallon of propane, as we don't use much. Still works out to only a few hundred dollars per year. If you rent the tank, you don't have any responsibility for maintenance.

Piping requirements will depend upon local regulations. We have flexible hose running in the crawl space.

I have no experience with induction cooktops, but I would never want to go back to a conventional electric cooktop again.

If I were in your shoes, I would quickly get some price estimates, and then decide which way to go. Personally, I would spend a fair premium for the gas cooktop. I enjoy cooking, and life is too short to spend so many hours in a kitchen that has compromises. Just my opinion.
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Old 08-15-2015, 08:43 AM   #20
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Induction cooktops are the most economical kind of electrcal cooktop, as there is no wasted heat rising around the pot/pan. The only downside I know of is that if you lose power, say a squirrel decides to fry itself on a nearby transformer on the power lines, you have no cooktop. On the other hand, you never have to worry about running out of LP. In our area, Liquid Propane is one of the pricier options. And it's cold enough that many people have to fill their tanks twice a year or so. My co-worker had complained of 1200 dollar heating bills if the winter is very cold.

I like induction stoves for their safety, their functionality, and because I'm part geek and understand how they work. I do use a natural gas stove and oven in my home and liek every other appliance made by the hands of human, it needs maintenance every now and again. I've had to replace the burners, which just plain wore out, with multiple ports shooting out a great flame, while others gave just a little flame. I've had to replace the oven's hot surface igniter, and the spark igniters on the cooktop.

There is no perfect stove/range. You have to look at your situation and decide which is the most economical and useful option for you. Each has advantages, and disadvantages. And remember, expensive does not always mean high quality. Sometimes it just means expensive. Look for consumer report reviews.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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