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Old 08-13-2015, 06:45 PM   #1
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Range replacement advice please

My oven died and now I have a giant dilemma. I'm hoping the DC gurus can offer some counsel.

About 5 years ago we gutted and remodeled the kitchen and at the time bought an electric jennaire smooth top slide in range. We got the thing new but damaged at a liquidation type place and paid about $300 (it had a sticker price of $2600. for Jenn Air). The top was cracked and so we spent another $270 to replace the cracked top - still a deal. In the the interim 5 years, we've had to replace that top again after I dropped something on it an cracked it. Fast forward to last week. The circuit board for the oven is dead and google says that this is a common problem as the oven overheats the electronics. The replacement part is another $300.

We have no natural gas in the area so electric has been our only option but.....

We were contemplating installing a propane tank on the side of the house and swapping out our woodburning Fireplace for a propane insert. The kitchen is at the same end of the house. so...... suddenly it might be possible to put in a dual fuel range. Hmm....


Who has one?
  • Do you like it?
  • Does propane cook about the same as natural gas?
  • Are there any models out there that are mechanical i.e. no digital boards? (so sick of electronics dying in appliances. I've had this happen numerous times over the years)

The propane project and fireplace project is spendy and adding a range to it would add to the cost. We had the propane installation scheduled for October - that would be 2 months with no oven.

Would you :

Fix the current one
Wait and buy a dual fuel range
Ignore the issue entirely and use the microwave...


Any thoughts about this?

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Old 08-13-2015, 08:07 PM   #2
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I'm not sure what's meant by "dual fuel". When we bought a gas range for our home on the island, we just made sure that it was good for LP gas, and all that meant is that it came with the kit for converting it. We now have natural gas here in our new home, and I don't see a huge difference. I know that I read that LP didn't burn as hot, so maybe I'm not a great resource. We are also 4000 feet higher here than we were in the Bahamas, so there are many other differences in how things cook, especially when water is a significant ingredient.

I can say that we liked our GE range with LP gas, and we love this new GE Adora with natural gas. I just am so much more a fan of cooking with gas, even though it's only been for the last 4 years that I've had that luxury. I would never go back to electric if I had any choice.
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Old 08-13-2015, 08:30 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I'm not sure what's meant by "dual fuel". When we bought a gas range for our home on the island, we just made sure that it was good for LP gas, and all that meant is that it came with the kit for converting it. We now have natural gas here in our new home, and I don't see a huge difference. I know that I read that LP didn't burn as hot, so maybe I'm not a great resource. We are also 4000 feet higher here than we were in the Bahamas, so there are many other differences in how things cook, especially when water is a significant ingredient.

I can say that we liked our GE range with LP gas, and we love this new GE Adora with natural gas. I just am so much more a fan of cooking with gas, even though it's only been for the last 4 years that I've had that luxury. I would never go back to electric if I had any choice.
Janet, I've spent my life cooking with gas with two short bad memories with electric. We bought the same stove as RP largely on his recommendation and it's a dream. We are obviously at sea level.
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Old 08-13-2015, 08:34 PM   #4
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Time to ditch the current range. It's shown you the future.

A dual fuel range is often considered the best combo. "Experts" prefer electric ovens to gas. Those experts also prefer gas to electric for the cooktop. I agree. Another benefit is that propane is a higher energy gas than natural gas so you'll get even more BTUs from your burners.

I'd also go for a convection oven as you do a lot of baking.
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Old 08-13-2015, 08:38 PM   #5
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From my understanding, you have to change the orifices when converting. Here is a discussion about this:
How to Convert Your Gas Range From Natural to LP Gas
I LOVE our new GE stove. On the right side is has a BIG mother burner, and behind it is a small burner for simmering. Plus it has sealed burners
We also had a question about the difference between convection bake and convection roast and this is the response I got from GE:
In convection bake, the heat comes from the heating element in the rear of the oven (this element is not exposed like the bake and broil elements) and the convection fan circulates this heat evenly, over and around the food.
In convection roast, the heat comes from the broil (top) element only and the convection fan circulates the heated air evenly throughout the cavity. If you are using a roasting rack, the heated air will be circulated over, under and around the food, browning on all sides as if they were cooked on a rotisserie. The heated air seals in juices quickly for a moist and tender product.
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Old 08-14-2015, 03:02 AM   #6
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...suddenly it might be possible to put in a dual fuel range...
OR, you could replace the oven with a wall unit in electric. Then, after the propane install is done, get a gas cooktop. This was Himself's idea when I was daydreaming about options I could have whenif we move back to OH.
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:46 AM   #7
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We have propane for the fireplace and cooktop, along with an electric double wall oven. I don't use the oven all that much, as I don't bake (and my wife only rarely bakes). The gas cooktop is waaayyy better than the electric cooktop in previous houses. It's one of those ridiculously expensive Vikings, and the only complaint I have is that there is only one burner that is small enough for a gentle simmer on a small pan. The big burner can put out more heat than you ever want to use in a home kitchen. The house came with it, so I didn't have a choice.

If you can manage it, go for the dual fuel setup. You'll forget about the inconvenience waiting for the installation once you have it.

Edit - One more comment. The wall oven has a fan that runs whenever it is on, which was not the case in the previous house with a slide in cooktop and oven. Kind of annoying. My understanding is that this is a common complaint with wall ovens. Not sure if they are all like that, but worth considering.
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Old 08-14-2015, 09:48 AM   #8
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Souschef, you're right about having to change orifices for propane. I looked at the Adora and it looks really nice. I saw one with a griddle in the middle.

CG, tell himself that's a great idea.
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Old 08-14-2015, 11:47 AM   #9
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Propane is expensive and must be delivered. If its your only choice and you must have gas, go for it. Nice looking tank sitting outside too!
If it was me and only electric was available, I would stick with electric.

A proven inexpensive electric range. You proved what many have been saying over the years.
"High priced, un-tested appliances are not in your best interest"
Buy something thats priced fair and has been in production for some time. This enables the manufacturer to work out any issues.
Better they work them out than the consumer.

Good Luck on whatever you choose. We had a similar decision to make regarding our heating and cooling. Turns out, the decision to go electric was less up front money and lower monthly utility cost.
Propane is expensive.
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Old 08-14-2015, 12:06 PM   #10
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I have the same problem with no gas pipe to the kitchen, so when I replaced my appliances a few years ago I bought a glass top stove. If I had it to do over I would have gotten the induction range. I use an induction burner in the Amoretti test kitchen and I really like the way it works. It's instant on/off like gas, it boils water in under a minute, it doesn't heat up the kitchen, and if you are doing something like deep frying, you can set the burner for temperature, so there's no need for a thermometer in the pot. I need to call Jerome, the appliance guy to fix my dishwasher and maybe my dryer, so while he's there I will ask if it's feasible to replace my cook top with an induction unit. I usually don't trust repair people, but Orange Julius trusts Jerome, so I trust Jerome.
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