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Old 10-16-2007, 05:08 AM   #1
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Slow Cooker *might* not be as useful as I'd hoped

I have a bit of a slow cooker issue. It's that I don't know *anyone* who goes to work and gets back 8 hours later, but apparently there are quite a few of them because most recipes have "Low" as a 6 hour cook.

Once I've left my house at 7:30 to catch the bus, it takes me Eleven hours to get home again. At that stage, any dish taking 6 hours to cook is nearly twice cooked.

My slow cooker can't be programmed to switch to "keep warm" after 8 hours, nor can it turn on at a programmable time. I do have a powerpoint timer, but I'm not sure about food safety. Raw chicken, sitting at room temperature for even an hour before cooking? Not so good.

I'm thinking about experimenting with frozen or partially thawed meat, so that it comes gently back to thawed state and is then hit with the heat, but I'm not sure of how frozen it needs to be, or how to judge the, erm, frozanity of any given piece of meat.

So I'm looking for suggestions and guides on how to slow cook food for rather a long time. I find cooking at night robs me of most of my spare time once dishes are done. I'm single and my housemate doesn't want to cook together, so I'm the only one who organizes my food. I'm thinking a combination of frozen meat and chilling the crock and ingredients the night before, combined with a 1 hour delay on cooking, MIGHT be the way to go, but I'm just not sure.

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Old 10-16-2007, 06:37 AM   #2
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Heavy Duty Lamp Appliance Timers. These are relatively inexpensive and are simple to use. Just set the time you want the Appliance to come on. If your recipe calls for 6 hours of cooking, set the timer 6 hours prior to your returning home. When you arrive, Dinner is ready!


Enjoy!
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Old 10-16-2007, 07:01 AM   #3
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That's what I was thinking UB, until they mentioned leaving the chicken sit in the cooker for several hours before the cooker comes on. From what I've read here on frozen foods.... I don't think that even partially frozen chicken or any meat should be slowly warmed/thawed up to cooking temp.
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Old 10-16-2007, 07:22 AM   #4
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Good point Pacanis! I missed that part. You know I wonder how we are all still alive sometimes.
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Old 10-16-2007, 10:07 AM   #5
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How old is your slow cooker? The newer ones cook faster and at a higher temp than the older ones.

If you wanted to have extended cooking time in your slow cooker, there are a couple of options. You could use a table-top lamp dimmer to decrease the power of the crock pot so that it cooks at a lower temperature, ideally about 170 degrees. A good way to test the dimmer is to fill the slow cooker halfway with water, then set the dimmer to the 3/4 mark and let it go for 3-4 hours then check the temp of the water with a meat thermometer. Adjust the dimmer as needed so that you hit 170 degrees, then mark the spot on the dimmer with a permanent marker. We talk about the dimmer in this thread.

Alternatively, you can get an AC timer that has multiple on/off settings like this one. Then start with frozen food, and have the timer come on 1 hour after you leave, Let it stay on for 4 hours, then go off for 2-3 hours, then back on for a few hours, then off, then back on. By doing this, you keep the food hot enough to be out of the danger zone without constantly adding heat to it and over cooking it.

ETA:
I just saw in another thread that you recently got an Engineering degree? Was it electrical? If so, I think youíll really like the thread about the dimmer. Ohmís Law is always fun!
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Old 10-16-2007, 10:11 AM   #6
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There is a wide margin of error for slow cookers. Try making a recipe that calls for 8 hours on low and you might be surprised that even after 11 hours it is still good. This will not always work so you will have to pick your dishes carefully, but lots of times it will be fine.
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Old 10-16-2007, 11:08 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadlex View Post
I have a bit of a slow cooker issue. It's that I don't know *anyone* who goes to work and gets back 8 hours later, but apparently there are quite a few of them because most recipes have "Low" as a 6 hour cook.

Once I've left my house at 7:30 to catch the bus, it takes me Eleven hours to get home again. At that stage, any dish taking 6 hours to cook is nearly twice cooked.

My slow cooker can't be programmed to switch to "keep warm" after 8 hours, nor can it turn on at a programmable time. I do have a powerpoint timer, but I'm not sure about food safety. Raw chicken, sitting at room temperature for even an hour before cooking? Not so good.

I'm thinking about experimenting with frozen or partially thawed meat, so that it comes gently back to thawed state and is then hit with the heat, but I'm not sure of how frozen it needs to be, or how to judge the, erm, frozanity of any given piece of meat.

So I'm looking for suggestions and guides on how to slow cook food for rather a long time. I find cooking at night robs me of most of my spare time once dishes are done. I'm single and my housemate doesn't want to cook together, so I'm the only one who organizes my food. I'm thinking a combination of frozen meat and chilling the crock and ingredients the night before, combined with a 1 hour delay on cooking, MIGHT be the way to go, but I'm just not sure.
Per the instructions for my model, food should not be frozen (too cold) or too hot when placed in the CP, used to rreheat food, nor can my model go into the freezer or oven. Food should be at room temp, or the crockery may crack and food may not cook evenly. Depends on your model/instructions.

Re cooking at night robs you of spare time - not sure I understand. My solution would be - put the food in the CP before you go to bed, allow time for food to cool, then refrigerate. Just reheat in the oven or microwave on low when you get home. Hope that helps.
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Old 10-16-2007, 11:20 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
Per the instructions for my model, food should not be frozen (too cold) or too hot when placed in the CP, used to rreheat food, nor can my model go into the freezer or oven. Food should be at room temp, or the crockery may crack and food may not cook evenly. Depends on your model/instructions.

Re cooking at night robs you of spare time - not sure I understand. My solution would be - put the food in the CP before you go to bed, allow time for food to cool, then refrigerate. Just reheat in the oven or microwave on low when you get home. Hope that helps.
Thatís interesting! What brand of slow cooker do you have? Iíve got a Rival, and they say you can cook frozen food. I had assumed all slow cookers were the same in that regard?

Question:
Can I cook frozen meat in my Crock-Potģ slow cooker?

Answer:
Yes, but be sure to add at least 1 cup of warm liquid to the stoneware first. Do not preheat the unit. Cook recipes containing frozen meats an additional 4 to 6 hours on Low or 2 hours on High.
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Old 10-16-2007, 12:29 PM   #9
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You want to put food in a crockpot and let it sit on the counter for hours before cooking it?



HERE COME THE FOOD SAFETY POLICE!!!

Why don't you try putting the timer on the crockpot, then cook the food, in the crockpot, INSIDE the refrigerator?
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Old 10-16-2007, 12:34 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine View Post
...Why don't you try putting the timer on the crockpot, then cook the food, in the crockpot, INSIDE the refrigerator?

This is an interesting concept.

Don't you think a heating device inside a refrigerator generating heat for 8-10 hours might raise the temperature of the entire refrigerator into the danger zone and cause or initiate spoilage in the majority of what's in there?

Then there's the impact on the temperature of the freezer...
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