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Old 05-22-2011, 03:39 PM   #21
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Considering the original method for grinding spices was between two rocks, there needn't be a high level of science applied to the process.
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Old 05-22-2011, 03:50 PM   #22
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Wow, so much info and opinion! I was wanting a burr type as I have heard that the whirly blade type produces uneven results for spices. You know - some fine pieces and others much larger.

Also, I generally dislike whirly blade anything. I think it brutalizes the food. Burr-type is more of an old-fashioned thing. Please don't ask me why, it's just my own personal feeling that I can't defend on rational grounds. I won't make smoothy-type drinks in a blender. I will crush things up in a slow-moving auger-type juicer and then mix everything together with a whisk. A personal preference.

I've heard that there are indeed small, home-style burr grinders for hard spices. GB, why do you say that a burr grinder would not be as good as a whirly blade type for spices? I am curious, now.

Sure do appreciate all of your input.
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Old 05-22-2011, 04:25 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Daizymae View Post
Wow, so much info and opinion! I was wanting a burr type as I have heard that the whirly blade type produces uneven results for spices. You know - some fine pieces and others much larger.

Also, I generally dislike whirly blade anything. I think it brutalizes the food. Burr-type is more of an old-fashioned thing. Please don't ask me why, it's just my own personal feeling that I can't defend on rational grounds. I won't make smoothy-type drinks in a blender. I will crush things up in a slow-moving auger-type juicer and then mix everything together with a whisk. A personal preference.

I've heard that there are indeed small, home-style burr grinders for hard spices. GB, why do you say that a burr grinder would not be as good as a whirly blade type for spices? I am curious, now.

Sure do appreciate all of your input.
Taking that into consideration, this is what you want.....

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Old 05-22-2011, 04:55 PM   #24
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Thanks, Kayelle. I have had suribachis (they both broke when dropped - not by moi) for grinding seeds and it was a wonderful good feeling doing this work. I rather suspect I don't have the muscle strength for mashing cinnamon or nutmeg, though.

Funny you should mention this, cuz recently I have been on the hunt for a new suribachi in the hopes that this one will last for awhile.
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Old 05-22-2011, 05:14 PM   #25
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I used to have a spice grinder that looked like this:



An electric burr grinder can heat up the spices to the point that some of them get "burnt" or at least change flavour.

Some spices, like nutmeg, are traditionally grated, rather than ground. I imagine it's for the same reason that one usually wants to grate almond. If you grind almonds, it makes an oily mess.
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Old 05-22-2011, 08:44 PM   #26
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GB, why do you say that a burr grinder would not be as good as a whirly blade type for spices?
With spices you generally want a fine grind. A burr grinder is great at getting larger grinds that are consistently even. A blade type will be less expensive and get nice and fine.
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Old 05-22-2011, 09:56 PM   #27
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Considering the original method for grinding spices was between two rocks, there needn't be a high level of science applied to the process.
That is still the way I grind most of my spices. I use a mortar and pestle. Freshly ground spices have a different flavor and aroma than the boxed variety.
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Old 05-23-2011, 12:52 AM   #28
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That is still the way I grind most of my spices. I use a mortar and pestle. Freshly ground spices have a different flavor and aroma than the boxed variety.
Does that include all the usual spices used in making curry powder?

Is anyone here familiar with Turkish spice grinders?



I just read that they are tougher than your usual black pepper grinder.

P.S: How hard are coffee beans relative to spices? I've no idea! I have never tried to grind them.
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:54 AM   #29
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Those Turkish style grinders are attractive but are probably meant for a single spice use where you load the hopper with a ton of spice (such as black pepper) and grind as needed. It would be difficult to thoroughly clean the inside of one spice before grinding another.

Perhaps you should consider:
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Old 05-23-2011, 03:43 PM   #30
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Hey, Andy, that is one tough looking mortar & pestle. Where did you find that picture?
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