"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Appliances
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-28-2011, 01:00 PM   #1
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Stand mixer or Food Processor for dough?

Which would you choose for making bread dough?

Please tell me the pros and cons of either machine for making dough.

__________________

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2011, 01:08 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,380
Stand mixer. It's made for kneading dough, can handle a larger load than a FP. Kneading dough in a FP is OK for a pie crust but not so much for loaves of bread or bagels etc.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2011, 01:12 PM   #3
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,413
I've never made dough in a food processor, but I have used a stand mixer. It seems to work fine, and I like the fact you can just walk away and let it do its thing. Same with a bread machine.

Having said that, although I make bread a couple of times a week, I very rarely use the stand mixer to do so. I find manually kneading bread to be oddly therapeutic and relaxing. :)
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2011, 01:18 PM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Salvy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: May Landing, N.J.
Posts: 20
Stand mixer or bread machine. Food processor for pastry or pasta dough. Sal.
__________________
Salvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 10:47 AM   #5
Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central New York
Posts: 50
A food processor that is 11 cups or larger can make good bread or pizza dough and can usually knead it in two minutes or less.

The downside of using a FP is that they do not have as much capacity as mixer and recipes designed specifically for a processor are not as numerous as those for a mixer.

Beth Henperger's "Bread Bible" has a chapter on FP bread with a dozen recipes and some good advice on the procedures used to make them successfully.

A food processor is not my preferred method and I frequently adapt food processor recipes to a mixer, but if you own one, there is no reason to buy the bread machine or stand mixer before you start making bread.
__________________
Jim
Weights of Baking Ingredients
jim262 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 11:26 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 19,045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
I've never made dough in a food processor, but I have used a stand mixer. It seems to work fine, and I like the fact you can just walk away and let it do its thing. Same with a bread machine.

Having said that, although I make bread a couple of times a week, I very rarely use the stand mixer to do so. I find manually kneading bread to be oddly therapeutic and relaxing. :)
I love kneading bread dough with my two hands. I can go off into another land with my thoughts. Or sometimes I sing. I think that you have to have the feel of the dough. Your hands just tell you when the dough is ready.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 11:34 AM   #7
Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Florida
Posts: 77
bread machine

I've had a bread machine for years. I've tried both my Kitchen Aid mixer and food processor for dough, but always go back to the bread machine for the dough. It is perfect all the time.
__________________
julesthegolfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 01:08 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,884
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I love kneading bread dough with my two hands. I can go off into another land with my thoughts. Or sometimes I sing. I think that you have to have the feel of the dough. Your hands just tell you when the dough is ready.
Not me. I enjoy kneading dough for about 1-2 minutes, then I get tired and bored.

I have friends that used to knead the dough with a stand mixer for the first part of the kneading and finish by hand.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 01:51 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
GLC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Near Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,216
It's pretty much a matter of capacity. I don't make single loaves/baguettes of yeast bread, so I use the mixer. It's also convenient to do the initial hand mixing in the mixer's bowl that goes directly to the mixer. I generally am making at least three baguettes, so the kneading is not a large component of the total time, considering the autolyzing period and the multiple rises.

I go to the FP for pasta and pizza. I like it, because I'm usually in more of a hurry during meal prep than in bread making, and I can work without really measuring in the FP, adding liquid until it starts spinning a ball of dough. And neither pasta nor the thin and crispy pizza I want suffer much if I overdo the processor a bit.

All kneading methods, including hand kneading involves trade-offs. With the FP, you have to be careful about over kneading. You'll know if it gets out of hand, because the dough will puddle and won't hold a shape. That's unlikely with a mixer and very unlikely by hand. But the FP can knead so quickly that the flour has less exposure to oxygen and therefore possibly more flavor. You lose some gluten structure to being cut by the FP blade, and I doubt the strands are as long or so well organized as they are with the mixer or by hand. A FP heats the dough, so it might rise more quickly, but at that point, you're back to the risk of overkneading.

Both FP and mixer might have to be gotten out and set up, if they're not always on the counter, and a heavy mixer is more of an operation than a FP. And both have to be cleaned and put away.
__________________
"Kitchen duty is awarded only to those of manifest excellence..." - The Master, Dogen
GLC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 01:59 PM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 985
I use my bread machine on the dough setting for everything. It does suck when I want to make more than one loaf at a time, but the convenience of just dumping the ingredients and walking away is worth it to me. I made hot dog buns, and was shaping them while my loaf of bread was being kneaded, and risen, to be put in a loaf pan. The timing was perfect, since they have to bake at different temperatures. I never bake in the bread machine because I like the shape of a traditional loaf better.
__________________

__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
food, mixer

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.