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Old 02-17-2008, 03:57 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Maverick2272 View Post
So what are the benefits of using the pressure cooker over a slow cooker if they can pretty much cook the same things?
They make up for poor planning. I can't always be sure of what I want to cook so I can go to the store after work and have a more traditional slow-cooked/braised meal in a matter of an hour or sometimes two. And sometimes when I cook chicken pieces I'm not at home to have them slow cook for 4 hours or so - so it's 20 minutes in the PC instead.

I have a hard time converting recipes to a slow cooker but no problem at all with a pressure cooker. I have been using a pressure cooker way longer than a slower cooker. It's just what I'm comfortable with - - - - - oh, and it makes up for poor planning - did I mention that?
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:15 PM   #12
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So it might have something to do with poor planning, but you are not sure??

Ok, so you get the same effect of a slow cooker but in a lot less time. That would definitely be a benefit. And if it can double as a slow cooker as well, then all bases covered it would seem.

By the way, when one person says slow cooker and another says crock pot I always assumed they were talking about the same thing, am I wrong?

I know with my crock pot I start it on low in the morning before I leave the house so it will be done when I get home, maybe I am more daring?
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:31 PM   #13
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Crockpot versus slow cooker is like saying Kleenex versus tissue - one is registered.

I think some older ones actually had elements running up the sides of them - or was it strictly on the bottom? It may have been just the bottom because things used to burn in them if I recall correctly.
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:34 PM   #14
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Why, whatever do you mean, dear? Yes, that's what I meant and I changed it so people wouldn't get confused!
Well thank you for making me look, errrr, stupid
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:44 PM   #15
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Well thank you for making me look, errrr, stupid
It was only a LITTLE bit of evil I used the powers for -
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:48 PM   #16
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My slowcooker has a separate base that is the heating element, which is nice because you can put the pot part in the dishwasher. I never burned anything though.... Maybe because technically it was a separate heating element and didn't get very hot. It's ancient, but works great.

I like the idea of this electric pressure cooker because of the timers. That seems like a really nice feature that's actually needed if you want to be able to walk away and the the PC do its thing. I remember looking up Emeril's one pot pressure cooker. It worked from the burner and he made some really good looking oxtails in it by browning them first, right in the pot. If you noticed, this one by QVC has a browning feature. The one by Emeril was 150 bucks That seemed a little over the top for basically a pot with a tight fitting lid.
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Old 02-17-2008, 04:57 PM   #17
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I've had several pressure cookers over the years. Mirro at first and then big ones for canning quarts (meat) and now I got the Fagor which comes with two bottoms. It really has taken the guessing out of that little bobbing stopcock.
I used to use mine a lot more 40 years ago, but then crockpots hadn't come into their own then. Now I use it for canning and for dried beans as well as steaming Boston brown bread. But I think the difference in the two appliances, is whether you think about things 8 hours before you want it done, or 1/2 hour before you want it done! I use the crockpot if I am with it the night before and have things prepared to stick the ingredients into the pot in the morning. The pressure cooker gets used when I want something done and I haven't done my prethinking.
One of my family's favorite recipes was stuffed heart cooked in the pressure cooker. Even people who thought they didn't like organ meat would go crazy for that stuffed heart, served with gravy and mashed potatoes. It's sure hard to get heart anymore around here unless I have a hunter save me a venison one.
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Old 02-17-2008, 05:44 PM   #18
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I don't own an electric pressure cooker but as some others I have used my pressure cooker since I learned to cook.

It not just helps with poor planning but in these times when gas is so expensive it also helps use less gas. I use it to cook beans and all sorts of stews and curries.

You can also cook rice and any types of vegetables also in the cooker. It's a versatile peice of equipment if you get comfortable with it.

I am not a huge fan of too many appliances that clutter my countertop. To me a stove top pressure cooker doubles as a stockpot as well. I purchased a heavy duty one that is made by SEB (that also makes TFal) and I paid close to 200 dollars for it but it's extremely heavy duty (aluminum core with stainless) and it works very well.
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Old 02-17-2008, 05:54 PM   #19
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Generally speaking about making a one pot meal in a pressure cooker;

If the meat is frozen, should the veggies be frozen, too? Or is this where you would cook in two phases, starting with the meat, stopping and adding the rest of your ingredients?
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Old 02-17-2008, 06:33 PM   #20
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Generally speaking about making a one pot meal in a pressure cooker;

If the meat is frozen, should the veggies be frozen, too? Or is this where you would cook in two phases, starting with the meat, stopping and adding the rest of your ingredients?
I would cook the meat first (determine when it's about 3/4 of the way done or so. And you usually can't overcook a pot roast anyway. Then use what is called the "quick release" method. Take your PC (mine is not electric so I don't know how you do this for an electric one) and sit it in your sink and let the water run over it. I use the sprayer to get all the sides. Once the pressure is released remove the lid, add your veggies, replace lid, and continue cooking. Start timing once it starts hissing (or however you know yours has come to temp).

I would like to add that I would still add some onions, carrots, celery to start the seasoning process of the meat though. Just add fresh later.
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