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Old 02-19-2008, 02:13 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Lots of info in your post darlenemt08.
So which do you like better, your slowcooker or your pressure cooker?
I prefer the slow cooker most of the time. I don't have to watch it as much as I do the pressure cooker. It's great to put something in before I go to bed late and the next morning, the meat is done in time for lunch. I just started using my crockpot more within the past 3 yrs. but since I've gotten the roaster, I use it so much more and just enjoy using it.

I also use my roaster to raise bread. It works well to raise bread with the roaster heating water on its lowest setting. So, my roaster is getting a lot more use out of it than just cooking.

Darlene
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:11 AM   #32
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It came in today!
Any ideas on what to make in it first?

Things I am thinking about is something I have, such as chuck roast, short ribs, country style pork "ribs", pork chops..... I have this stuff frozen. I would also like something that really utilizes the PC and makes me say, "wow, this is good and was really fast".
As most of you know, I like to keep what I'm cooking as basic as I can... no fresh herbs or ingredients that aren't readily available in small town grocery stores, but if I have to leave the house to pick something up I just have to have, I will.

I hope it was OK to ask for ideas here....

Let's get pressure cookin'!
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:22 AM   #33
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I vote for the chuck roast!!! Beef broth and water, onions, celery to start.

I like my roasts falling apart. Therefore, I tend to cook longer than directions state. If your recipe says your roast is done after 1 hour I may cook for 30 or even 60 more minutes. The roast does NOT dry out, it just falls apart, which is what I want. You can add potatoes and carrots at this point if you want. I really do like mine really soft when it comes to roasts. If you don't like yours as soft just add them about 45 minutes before your roast is done. You can always check and adjust cooking time.

So.....having said that I add the onions and celery at first (bay leaf, peppercorns, smashed cloves of garlic if you want but it's really not necessary) and cook. Use the quick release method and test for doneness. If your roast isn't falling apart cook for another 20 minutes or so. Always start timing when the cooker comes back up to heat.

It's just going to turn out wonderful!!! From frozen state to totally done I would guesstimate 2 hours.
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:34 AM   #34
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Sounds great.
Help me out with a couple things if you would...
Since I am starting with a frozen chuck roast, I add the veggies about halfway through the cooking time? Did I read that right? I like my veggies soft and don't want to have to use a knife on the roast.
When doing a thawed roast in the crock pot I always season and sear the meat first. My PC has a browning setting. Is there a way to season and sear a frozen piece of meat, or should I skip this step?

I guess I'll pretty much adapt things the way I do when using a slow cooker, but how much liquid should I add? We all know how much liquid is generated in a slow cooker, does a PC do the same thing?

Man, I can't wait! I didn't have anything taken out for tonight yet either!
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:44 AM   #35
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Then just put your veggies on top of the roast in the beginning. I like my veggies soft too!

I wouldn't bother with browning in this instance. Normally, I would though. I just brown my roast (seasoned and floured) then top with the veggies.

I'll tell you up front that I am always sorry when I do my potatoes in the pressure cooker instead of making mashed potatoes with my roast - all that gravy and no mashed potatoes is SOOOOOOOOOOOO sad!

As far as liquid - remember that in a pressure cooker there's a certain amount of steam that escapes. It's just a bit different than a crockpot in that you can put a little bit of liquid in the bottom of the crockpot and be ok. A pressure cooker takes more liquid. There should be something in your instructions about how much liquid is required for safety reasons. I think I usually add enough liquid to come up half way to 3/4's of the way up the roast.
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:44 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I didn't have anything taken out for tonight yet either!
The beauty of a pressure cooker - THAT's why I love them.
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:47 AM   #37
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Wonderful.
Thanks for all the help
pics to follow
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Old 02-21-2008, 11:57 AM   #38
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Wonderful.
Thanks for all the help
pics to follow
Can't wait for the day when you can Fax me a plate!
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Old 02-21-2008, 12:13 PM   #39
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Maybe you should make chicken.
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Old 02-21-2008, 12:25 PM   #40
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I can't comment on fried chicken specifically, or that electric pressure cooker, but as far as I know, and I am something of an expert, you need liquid to truly make a pressure cooker work. It's based on steam and that's what builds pressure.

I do know that the Swiss manufacturer makes something, or did, called a pressure fryer but I don't cook chicken that way so don't know if it really did/does that.

I have made incredible garlic mashed potatoes in just minutes with great results in my pressure cooker. And the few times that I have cooked meat, such as pot roast, it's turned out tender and delicious.

I am not sure that the electric version is better than the stove top. Good luck.
I believe that Swiss "pressure fryer" to which you refer is a 5-quart pressure cooker by Kuhn-Rikon. I have that as well as their 8-quart pressure cooker. But let me say emphatically that it is not for pressure frying. It is simply a braiser-shaped pressure cooker with a waffle interior that supposedly allows for fat-free sauteeing. In fact, they've dropped the word "fry" or "fryer" altogether.

It is a wonderful and versatile cooker, as are all their PCs -- top quality. I bought it after seeing it recommended in one of Madjur Jaffrey's (sp?) cookbooks for all sorts of chicken and lamb dishes that involve browning.
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