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Old 09-11-2007, 09:40 AM   #1
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Vintage rotisserie no manual. HELP!

My Mother in law gave me her old rotisserie, probably from the 50s or 60s in excellent condition. Unfortunately no manual.

It's by Black Angus Inc. I can find no information on this company, it must have went under ages ago. There is a shallow pan on top and a hinged lid, I have no idea what it is for, water? For cooking? Can anyone give me any basics on using this, approx. how long and what temp for whole chicken, roasts etc.(yes I do plan on checking with a meat thermometer.) Or give me a site for a similar product where I could download a free manual? Any help would be appreciated.

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Old 09-11-2007, 09:44 AM   #2
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What State/City was it manufactured in?
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Old 09-11-2007, 09:53 AM   #3
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Winsted, Conn, USA.
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Old 09-11-2007, 10:07 AM   #4
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This business no longer exist in Winstead. Since it is an electric appliance I would not place water in the pan you mentioned. Maybe just place a chicken on the spit, set the temp at 350* and let it go for an hour. Then check the internal temp of the bird. Through trial and error you will be able to use it I am sure!
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Old 09-11-2007, 10:11 AM   #5
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Thanks for the help Uncle Bob! I kinda figured I would have to go the trial and error route. I'll give it a try tomorrow.
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Old 09-11-2007, 10:14 AM   #6
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I believe the shallow pan on the top allows you to use residual heat to warm foods or keep them warm. I don't know if it would get hot enough to actually cook food. You may be able to steam veggies.
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Old 09-11-2007, 10:23 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I believe the shallow pan on the top allows you to use residual heat to warm foods or keep them warm. I don't know if it would get hot enough to actually cook food. You may be able to steam veggies.
I do believe this is correct also. Somewhere in the deep recesses of my mind, I have a memory from my childhood of an electric contraption like this. This top pan was a "warming" tray of sorts. Maybe for bread etc.
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Old 09-11-2007, 10:30 AM   #8
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The pan on top is a warming tray. More than likely, there used to be a cover for the top that is now lost. Either way, that pan gets warm and can hold other items warm as well. It’s a good place to put rolls to keep them warm. You could also put tightly sealed foil packs there as well.

It appears that this unit is also a toaster oven so you can use it for broiling as well. If it has a bottom heating element, then it can also be used for baking, but more than likely, it only has a top element that is used for the rotisserie and for broiling. There should be a setting on the control knobs that differentiate between rotisserie (activate the motor) and just broiling (motor is off).

When you use the rotisserie, make sure to keep the drip pan in the bottom position as shown in the picture.....but you can remove that wire rack for rotisserie coking. The wire rack would be use for broiling, and when broiling, you would move the drip pan and wire rack to the upper slot so that it is close to the upper element.

I typically do chickens at 400 degrees F, and give it 15-17 minutes per pound. So for a 4 pound bird, at 17 minutes per pound, it will take 68 minutes. After that time, check the temperature in the thigh of the bird with a meat thermometer. It is done at 170 degrees F. Remove the chicken, cover in foil, and let it rest 5 to 10 minutes before carving. When doing a chicken in the rotisserie, make sure to truss it (tie it up) well. You want the legs and wings to be tight against the body and not flapping about, and certainly not bumping into the heating element as the bird turns.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:30 PM   #9
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The pan on top is definitely a warming/heating tray.

My "modern" Popeil "Showtime" Rotisserie has one, along with a cover for it, & it's meant to be used to warm/heat rolls, beans, already cooked vegetables, etc., etc. Works quite well. If your pan doesn't have a cover, I'm sure a sheet of aluminum foil would work just as well.
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Old 09-11-2007, 12:53 PM   #10
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Heh.....I just re-read the OPís post and took a closer look at the pic. The warming tray on top has a hinged lid that can be closed.

Ok, since the lid is flat, itíll me hard to get rolls in there, but you can definteily steam veggies and keep other types of food warm. I probably gets pretty hot in that pan since itís right on top of the heating element. Does the pan lift out for cleaning? If not, you may want to stick to using foil pouches in it.
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