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Old 02-12-2006, 02:17 AM   #1
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What to do with rotisserie

My cousin just got me a Franklin Chef Vertisserie, this big elaborate rotisserie contraption. Unfortunately, while I am somewhat into cooking (moreso into baking) I just haven't found myself inspired to do anything with it yet, and I haven't really even thought about how to use it.

Any ideas? My cousin asked me if I had used it, and I felt really guilty, so I would like to at least be able to say I have given it a test run. I thought about doing a whole chicken, but that seems a little boring. What about something pork based? Any rib ideas? What does one do with such a contraption?

To be honest, the whole concept of the rotisserie is kind of unknown to me. Roasting, sauteeing, frying, braising, steaming... those I get. But what's the routine for rotisserie? How long does it take? What's the prep work like?

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Old 02-12-2006, 07:21 PM   #2
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Whole chickens are great on a rotisserie!! I don't have one myself, but I have a couple of friends that do and they love them. Here is a couple pretty good threads that have discussions about rotisseries.

Rotisserie

More rotisserie
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Old 02-13-2006, 03:32 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by jasonr
My cousin just got me a Franklin Chef Vertisserie, this big elaborate rotisserie contraption. Unfortunately, while I am somewhat into cooking (moreso into baking) I just haven't found myself inspired to do anything with it yet, and I haven't really even thought about how to use it.

Any ideas? My cousin asked me if I had used it, and I felt really guilty, so I would like to at least be able to say I have given it a test run. I thought about doing a whole chicken, but that seems a little boring. What about something pork based? Any rib ideas? What does one do with such a contraption?

To be honest, the whole concept of the rotisserie is kind of unknown to me. Roasting, sauteeing, frying, braising, steaming... those I get. But what's the routine for rotisserie? How long does it take? What's the prep work like?


Keep it. Rotisseried chickens are much more healthier for you because the fat runs off the meat and into a tray on the bottom. The result is a less fatty chicken and the rotation process helps make for a more tender juicier product! Also, the skin on the chickens browns beautifuly and is crispy and dry.

The only thing that seems like a monumental task to me is tying the bird for the unit. I own the George Jr. Rotisserie. It DOES produce beautifuly-browned chickens when used for that purpose.

So, don't get rid of it. Try it once and see how you like it. I think you will.


~Corey123.
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Old 02-13-2006, 05:34 PM   #4
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I went to a pot-luck kind bbq last 4th of July and one of the guests brought a couple of chickens prepared with a bbq rub, done in a rotisserie. They were the most tender chicken I've ever tasted - I was so impressed, I bought my own rotisserie. Tying the chicken is a bit of a pain - I always get my hands and counter-top messy when I tie the bird and it's already sprinkled with dry rub. But after that, it's a quick clean up. The bird (7lb) cooks quite fast, too, smells wonderful, browns beautifully. It's also good for doing a turkey breast - especially since turkey can be so dry. We've done small roasts of lamb and beef, and everything has always come out beautifully. I wouldn't use it every time I do a roast though - sometimes I like all the palava of roasting in a pan with oinions and veg and potatoes and doing the gravy - with a rotisserie, the fat runs into a pan on the bottom and you can save a little to make a gravy in a saucepan. Sandyj
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Old 02-13-2006, 05:53 PM   #5
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Tie the bird first, then sprinkle on the dry rub.

You'll find that doing it this way is a whole lot less messy!
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Old 02-13-2006, 10:40 PM   #6
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I am going to try a prime rib in a rotisserie, very soon. My mouth waters thinking about it!!!
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Old 02-13-2006, 10:45 PM   #7
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Mine mostly sits in the cupboard and takes up space.

I should use it more often!
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