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Old 01-19-2005, 08:50 AM   #11
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Here's a bit of explanation from the site above


An Aga is made of cast iron - a dense, strong and stable metal with remarkable heat storage and transmission properties. Conventional ovens have very little mass and cool rapidly, causing them to continuously cycle on and off in an attempt to maintain a steady temperature. As a result, oven temperatures can swing up to 75°F and subject food to frequent high blasts of uneven heat. An Aga, in contrast, generates heat by the single burner which is then continually released by the cast iron through the ovens and hot plates - that's why an Aga is always ready to use. This 'radiant heat' is transmitted from all sides of the ovens and is "less severe" than heat that would be created by a direct fuel flame or electric element. The result? All the moisture, flavour, texture and goodness of the food is preserved, producing the 'Aga taste' owners talk about so passionately!

I enjoyed cooking on it, but found that I had to plan more carefully what I intended to cook on any given day!

The ovens were interesting, too - one cooked 'hot' for the set temperature - the small one, cooked a little cooler.

Mind you, there is nothing better than standing, on a cold, cold morning with a hot cup of tea in your hands and your bum against the front of the Aga.... bliss! 8)

I have lots of friends who don't want to move house because they don't want to lose their Aga or Rayburn (a similar stove). In fact, when I had mine removed (kitchen makeover time!), I sold it to a friend - and you're right they are VERY expensive! I believe Rayburns are a little less expensive - but only relatively so.....
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Old 01-19-2005, 08:57 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel
Mind you, there is nothing better than standing, on a cold, cold morning with a hot cup of tea in your hands and your bum against the front of the Aga.... bliss! 8)
Sounds lovely. Could use that here this morning! I wouldn't mind having one of these beasts, if someone else would pay for it and for all the re-wiring and piping. They are quite aesthetically pleasing.
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Old 01-19-2005, 11:53 AM   #13
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Hey, that Aga looks a lot like the type that R. Ray uses on her show, wonder if it is... They are very cute and vintage looking. Great to hear that they work really well too!

Yet another mental note for me to file away for when I have my dream kitchen (one day).
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Old 01-19-2005, 06:12 PM   #14
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They are very nice to look at.... my Grandma had one, then my mum - and then me!

BUT, the new kitchen (about 2 years ago now) is just so much more practical and quicker, too.

HTC - who's R Ray? Don't forget I don't live on your side of the pond and very few American cooks make it onto TV here.... 8)
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Old 01-19-2005, 07:04 PM   #15
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Ishbel, sorry for being so geo-centric! :-)

R. Ray is Racheal Ray, she has several shows on the food network. The one in particular that has a cute range is called 30 minute meals. I've included the link below.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/show_tm

BTW, do they have a version of Food Network where you are? A channel completely dedicated to cooking/kitchen things?
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Old 01-19-2005, 07:13 PM   #16
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I have a gas stove.. but, natural gas doesn't come out to the woods where I am .. so we use propane. I don't think it gets hot enough. Takes for ever to boil water. At this point I'd like to go back to the eletric one I had at our last house.
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Old 01-19-2005, 10:25 PM   #17
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Speaking from years of professional cooking, I can say gas is the only good option. Unfortunately, at home I have an electric stove. :oops: I rent, too, so it's not a great option to buy my own stove, although I could (the house has a gas water heater & furnace). I'll probably move before within a year, though.
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Old 01-20-2005, 01:05 AM   #18
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Weren't some Aga's also intended to warm water? That's why they were always on. I know there was the option of choosing fuel, oil, wood, coal etc.

A good friend of mine has a new Aga. It has the same charm, but a modern gas cooktop and three ovens. She has had mixed results. I know she cannot make her favorite merengues anymore.

The Aga sites all seemt to be in the process of updating. Here is the Dutch one. There is a picture of the new Aga on it.


http://www.aga.nl

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Old 01-20-2005, 03:48 AM   #19
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Pam - yes, Aga's provided hot water and in some houses, the central heating, too.

My Granny was the first of my family to use an Aga - and it was what I grew up with.. But, as I said, I find my new, simpler gas cooker a joy to use - and fits better into the slightly more high-tech style of kitchen I know have, rather than the cottage style we had before, where the Aga fitted in very well!

Hmmmm - I made meringues in my Aga - so maybe the 'refinements' of the newer style make a difference to performance. As I said, I found that Agas are temperamental, and each one seems to have its own quirks... just a case of learnng them and adapting. 8)
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Old 01-20-2005, 06:38 AM   #20
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I have an ancient 30" Frigidaire electric oven. It works okay, but year before last the bottom oven coil flamed out. In fact, I'm quite proud of my DIY home-repair job that I did, in replacing the coil myself. (With the help of the Internet and a hundred questions to the Lowe's appliance guy.) I couldn't afford to have an appliance repair guy come to the house to replace it, so it was a case of do it myself or do without. It was scary, the first time I turned on the oven after I'd done the replacement. What would happen? Would it work properly or blow up or what? But it's worked perfectly ever since.

I'm glad you asked this, Htc. I've been meaning to post a question on this thread. Am I crazy, or is there such a thing as a unit with a gas stovetop and electric oven? Seems I've seen reference to such ... I'd like to google it, but I don't know what it's called. Do you know?

Anyway, that's what I'd have in my dream kitchen. I'd have to use propane like the poster upthread, but I wouldn't mind, if it meant I could have a gas stovetop. I agree with the posters who complain of the difficulty of heat control with electrics.


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