"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Appliances
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-26-2005, 09:11 AM   #51
Master Chef
 
PA Baker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA, Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,000
AllenMI, I think you and I have twin kitchens--I have all of the same issues as you, including that I'm thinking of converting a small back coat closet into a pantry. The problem then is where to keep coats! :roll:

I do recommend you keeping an inventory list of what you have downstairs on your shelves. I also store stuff in the basement but have never taken the time to make a list of what I have on hand--hence having WAY too much TP and sponges and realizing too late that I don't have other things!
__________________

__________________
-A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand
PA Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 04:56 PM   #52
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
I definately prefer gas for a cooktop.
When I had my house built, (15 years ago) I spent $3,500.00 to extend the city gas line to my property. Gas just seems to be more responsive for me than electric. I'm re-doing my kitchen a bit now and plan on installing a 36" five burner cooktop with a high output burner and a simmer burner. I'm still undecided about my choice of a double wall oven though.
John.
__________________

__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 05:42 PM   #53
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
JohnL - one thing to consider about your double oven - some double ovens - like mine unfortunately - are much smaller than a regular oven. It can't hold my favorite skillet when I pan fry salmon and it won't hold some cookie sheets - they won't fit either way you place them. So........... just be on the "lookout" for the size.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 06:16 PM   #54
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
Hi K. Elf,
I've considered that and am looking at the 30" models which seem to be the largest of the standard size models. My main question now is whether or not I should spring for the top convection oven feature or not. They are quite more expensive, but what the heck I hope I won't remodel for another 15 years.
John.
__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 06:28 PM   #55
Assistant Cook
 
retirednana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 8
:D CatsEyes: Our duel fuel range is natural gas burners and dual electric/convection. They do have the same range for propane users. Hope this helps.
__________________
WISH IT,
DREAM IT,
DO IT.
retirednana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 06:31 PM   #56
Assistant Cook
 
retirednana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 8
John: You won't be disappointed in the electric/convection oven. It is great for baking, roasting, etc. Love it. It was new to me and I was leary but now I use it all the time.
__________________
WISH IT,
DREAM IT,
DO IT.
retirednana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 06:37 PM   #57
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Maryland
Posts: 1,189
Thanks for the input nana,
Does convection cook things that much faster? And if so, how do you adjust temps or cooking times?
Is it just something that you experiment with untill you get the hang of it, or is there a conversion chart or something?
Thank you,
John.
__________________
"You wouldn't know a diamond if you held it in your hand. The things you think are precious I can't understand" STEELY DAN.
JohnL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 07:03 PM   #58
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
JohnL - check this out
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2005, 08:58 PM   #59
Assistant Cook
 
retirednana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 8
John: The link above is a good one to check out. I usually lower the temp by 25 degrees. I watch it carefully though and then annotate it on my reciipe. None of my recipes are geared to confection cooking so it is trial and error for me too.
__________________
WISH IT,
DREAM IT,
DO IT.
retirednana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2005, 11:35 PM   #60
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I hate it when this happens. I find a line and there are so many answers I can't figure out if I've already put my two cents' worth in. First of all, Allen, I had that stove in military housing 20 years ago, and it was old then, and I loved it!!!!!

When I moved here I had the choice of gas or electric, and I'm sorry if I'm repeating, but I chose a smooth-top electric range. 99% of the reason was ease of cleaning. I cook a lot, not just for fun, and I get to do 100% of the stove cleaning. Being able to wipe that stove top off so easily is a huge factor. I, too, own a very old house, and having that flat surface in an odd location is helpful (can easily pour a glass of juice, put the fridge items on it to load into the fridge after a grocery trip, etc, is very nice), and most importantly that many who absolutely say gas only either ignore or deny, gas burners are much, much hotter than electric, and if you do not have A/C (I don't), in the summer it can be unbearable. That heat may seem like an advantage, but electric heat pretty much goes straight from burner into the pot, whereas gas heats the entire kitchen. Great in winter. Not so good in summer. Most folk have central A/C and don't even notice it. Oh, yes, the bottoms of the pots and pans are a little cleaner over the years with electric.

Don't get me wrong, there are times (when I'm stir frying, for example) when I wish I had that extra control and heat. But I'd buy the same stove again tomorrow if I had to make the choice again. I use it so much, I'm wearing the color off of some of the burners, and am very happy with it.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What type of range do you use at home? Otter Appliances 24 02-08-2008 12:41 AM
Home made pasta: how to preserve it sashmit Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 4 02-07-2004 04:49 AM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.