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Old 07-15-2007, 07:54 PM   #11
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I don't know the brand of mine offhand, but I love it! It's quite heavy (but not as heavy as cast-iron), & made of shiny "non-stick" stainless steel. The lid is heavy tempered glass, which makes it easy to see what's going on inside without having to lift the lid & let all the heat escape.

It sears nicely & goes beautifully from stovetop to oven. And regardless of what I use it for, it's a snap to clean. I also didn't need to sell a kidney to buy it. Have had it for about 8 years now & it's still just as wonderful use today as the day I bought it.
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Old 07-15-2007, 10:25 PM   #12
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I recently read about a chef complaining about his Le Creuset dutch oven, preferring Staub for two main reasons: the phenolic lid knob of the LC which at some point gets ruined by high oven heat, and the thin handles/tabs of the LC which have broken off on him in the past. Apparently Staub is better on these two features.

Of course I read this review AFTER I had bought my LC!
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Old 07-15-2007, 10:32 PM   #13
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I really wouldn't worry about the LeC.

If a knob were to come off after repeated heating, you could easily replace it. My knob is fine after years of use.

I can't imagine the handles on my LeC falling off.
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Old 07-15-2007, 10:47 PM   #14
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Pam: What's the recipe?

It's very likely that you do not need a Dutch Oven at all.

Lee
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Old 07-15-2007, 10:53 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
I really wouldn't worry about the LeC.

If a knob were to come off after repeated heating, you could easily replace it. My knob is fine after years of use.

I can't imagine the handles on my LeC falling off.
I'm with Andy on this. If I use my Le Creuset at higher temps, I usually just remove the knob. I am able to remove the lid with some potholders if I have to.
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Old 07-16-2007, 07:07 AM   #16
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By the way, I've noticed that the inside of the cover of a Staub dutch oven has many round nubs that are equally spaced out. I gather this is to evenly redistribute condensed steam back into the food as water. The LC cover doesn't have these nubs.

Can anyone say if there's any difference in performance? TIA!
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Old 07-19-2007, 03:50 PM   #17
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Target sells a Chefmate 5 Qt enameled Dutch oven for $ 40. According to Cooks Illustrated, this ove performs equivalent to a Le Creuset.

I have a 5 Qt IKEA Dutch oven (made in France) which works great and is not that expensive ($ 60), see attached link: IKEA | Cooking | Speciality cookware | SENIOR
The only beef I have is that since is dark matte finished inside, is harder to check food, oil, etc. readiness (as opposed to bright, clear enamel)
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Old 07-19-2007, 03:55 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
By the way, I've noticed that the inside of the cover of a Staub dutch oven has many round nubs that are equally spaced out. I gather this is to evenly redistribute condensed steam back into the food as water. The LC cover doesn't have these nubs.

Can anyone say if there's any difference in performance? TIA!

Either way, the moisture stays in the pot. I don't think it matters much, if at all. The inside of the pot is a very moist environment throughout, including the airspace above the meat and liquid. The liquid condenses on the inside of the lid and drips back into the pot. In a braise, basting doesn't benefit the process.
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Old 07-19-2007, 03:57 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopstix
I recently read about a chef complaining about his Le Creuset dutch oven, preferring Staub for two main reasons: the phenolic lid knob of the LC which at some point gets ruined by high oven heat, and the thin handles/tabs of the LC which have broken off on him in the past. Apparently Staub is better on these two features.

Of course I read this review AFTER I had bought my LC!
I think that's only if you're using it in a professional kitchen doing high volume. I don't see how this would happen in a home kitchen unless you absolutely abused your Le Creuset.
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Old 07-19-2007, 10:29 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Either way, the moisture stays in the pot. I don't think it matters much, if at all. The inside of the pot is a very moist environment throughout, including the airspace above the meat and liquid. The liquid condenses on the inside of the lid and drips back into the pot. In a braise, basting doesn't benefit the process.
You're most probably right Andy. I haven't noticed any water collecting on the surface of my braise immediately after taking out of the oven. Maybe if I leave the dutch oven to cool while covered... but I never do that, so the absence of nubs on the lid is a non-issue. Thanks.
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