"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Appliances
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-02-2006, 11:22 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 31
Why does my broiler seem to be on the bottom?

I have read before that broiling in your oven means that the top burner of your oven gets turned on and it acts like an upside down grill.

I tried broiling some fish last night. When I looked in my oven, I can see flames coming from the bottom of my oven (underneath the bottom panel from a burner obviously) but I see absolutely nothing at the top.

As a result, I moved my fish from close to the top of my oven down to the bottom. When I did this, the fish started sizzling up and splattering. It appeared as though the broiler is indeed at the bottom of my oven and not the top.

Is it possible that certain types of ovens put the broiler on the bottom?

I looked on the label of my oven, it is made by GE. It has a website listed on it so it can't be that old. It says on their "waist high broiler (if so equipped)", not sure what that means. I have a drawer on the bottom with a pan for broiling, with a rack and pan underneath it to catch juices.

Anyway, I am just wondering if the broiler is on the top or bottom of my oven. I have read it is at the top but I only see a flame on the bottom. Is this common or not, or is the broiler in the oven not easily visible?

__________________

__________________
Rebam98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 04:59 AM   #2
Senior Cook
 
TomW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Alabama
Posts: 195
What you read is for an electric oven

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebam98
... I am just wondering if the broiler is on the top or bottom of my oven. I have read it is at the top but I only see a flame on the bottom...
It appears you have a gas oven. A typical gas oven only has one source of heat, and it is located at the bottom of the oven. To broil, the food needs to be placed on the very bottom rack.

Electric ovens have two heating elements - one at the top of the oven, and one at the bottom. The broiling element is the top one.

Hope this helps,
Tom
__________________

__________________
Curious fellow
TomW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 07:52 AM   #3
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
A lot of ovens that have the broiler on the bottom actually have a drawer on the every bottom. You need to open that drawer and put the food in there to broil.
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 08:09 AM   #4
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 1,285
GB, your right, I had a gas oven and the broiler was on the bottom with a drawer. In fact that kind of broiler takes away storage space under the oven.
__________________
thumpershere2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 09:24 AM   #5
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,380
The food goes into the little drawer under the oven. That way, the flame is above the food and will act like an upside down grill.

Newer gas stoves have two heat sources in the main oven. One under the floor of the oven to provide heat for baking and roasting and the other on the roof of the oven for broiling.

This change enables self cleaning for gas ovens. The two burners together provide the high heat needed for cleaning the oven.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 09:58 AM   #6
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
A broiler always works from above.

It provides a direct heat source (either flame or coils). It can't work from below the food, since the cooking vessel would get in the way.
__________________
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 10:03 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,757
is a professional salamander the same thing as a broiler in a home oven, just more btu's??
__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 05:13 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
A lot of ovens that have the broiler on the bottom actually have a drawer on the every bottom. You need to open that drawer and put the food in there to broil.

Oh. Thanks!

Will fish actually taste any better/different if I broil it?

I'm also worried about how safe it will be. I have a fire extinguisher handy. I was instructed to coat my fish with a protective oil coating and I am worried about the splattering.

Should I broil with that drawer open slightly?

Thanks so much guys!
__________________
Rebam98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2006, 05:15 PM   #9
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
A broiler always works from above.

It provides a direct heat source (either flame or coils). It can't work from below the food, since the cooking vessel would get in the way.

Ah. That makes sense.
__________________
Rebam98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2006, 09:15 AM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 18,757
rebam, the trick with a broiler is how close you put the meat or fish to the flame, and how long you let each side face the flame. closer will scorch the surface more, leaving the inside uncooked at first. farther away, and it will cook more like in the oven, with just a little browning - if any at all - on the top. some recipes will even tell you how many inches it should be from the flame.

i usually open the broiler drawer, slide out the pan and slotted tray, cover the tray in aluminum foil to help with clean up, then slide the pan and tray into the middle rails of the broiler drawer. there's usually a top, middle, and bottom position that it can go into. look into the drawer when sliding it in to see how far away from the flame the fish/meat is. then close the door unless you like to hear your smoke alarms going off from the escaping heat!

anyway, broil the fish/meat for just a few minutes, then check it by opening the door and sliding the tray out a little to see if it is cooking too fast on the surafce. if it's ok, turn it over to allow the other side to broil. (very thick fishes/meats will require more turns) slide it back in, close the door.

if the surface is getting too brown or black too fast, before it is cooking internally, then pull out the tray/pan and put it back in on a lower slot. if it isn't getting browned enough on the surface, then put it in a higher slot.
with a little practice, this will become a really good way of making fish, chicken, and steaks simply and easily.

and don't worry about a little splatter. you'll have to clean the tray and pan anyway, and eventually the oven too. the aluminum foil will help make that easier.
__________________

__________________
in nomine patri, et fili, et spiritus sancti.


Meh nom eh noh...doot dooooo do do do.
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.