"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cooking Resources > Cookbooks, Software etc.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-29-2011, 06:24 PM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 545
Anyone know any Sushi books?

I LOVE sushi. Not that I don't love the traditional but I admit -I also like the Americanized rolls too! I was hoping someone could give me a suggestion for a recipe book that has both. Thanks

__________________

__________________
Siegal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 07:13 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
I have just two things to recommend:

1. I checked out every sushi cookbook at my public library and ended up buying the best one. This one book has everything you need to know: The Great Sushi and Sashimi Cookbook. It's $13 at Amazon or you can find it under 641.5952 G7865at your public library (where available). I'm pretty sure it has stuff like California rolls, but probably not some of the fantastic concoctions some US sushi bars come up with.

2. Get the right rice. I've settled on Kokuho Rose as the best I could find in Los Angeles. Your sushi will never work out right until you get the right rice. I've heard Kagayaki recommended but never found it so never tried it.
__________________

__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 07:18 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
salt and pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,027
Sushi, taste and technique by Kimiko Barber & Hiroki Takemura
I have many sushi books but this is a go to book.
__________________
salt and pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 07:24 PM   #4
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 545
Thanks guys. going to due some research on those books.
__________________
Siegal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 09:43 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
I've heard Kagayaki recommended but never found it so never tried it.
Check out H-mart most of the ones that I have been in (but not CA) had it they have locations in

Diamond Bar
Irvine
Norwalk
Garden Grove

Hmart.com: Online Shopping for Asian Grocery, Korean Kimchi, Rice Cookers, Appliances & more at everyday low prices.

Failing that try some of the big Korean markets in Korea town. Or Nijiya markets Store Location /
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 11:20 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Timothy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: St. Augustine, Florida
Posts: 2,491
Instead of buying a book, I would suggest using your local library's Inter-LIbrary-Loan Service. (ILL Service).

Look up any book online and get it's ISBN number. Give that to the library and they can get the book for you for no charge.

There was a gadget I had when I first started making sushi called a "Sushi Magic", and it actually worked pretty well for both rolls and nigiri, but I out-grew it rapidly and make it all by hand now.

All you really need is a bamboo rolling mat. Getting the rice cooked right is the hardest part of the whole process.

Assembling the sushi isn't that hard once you get over the fear factor.
__________________
Confirmed Sushi Addict
Timothy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 01:28 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: here
Posts: 3,612
Thanks for the tip PPT. The Kokuho Rose has worked well for me but I'm very tempted to try the Kagayaki next time I run out. None of those cities are nearby (I'm in "The Valley") but I'd order online in preference to driving that far, particularly in our traffic.

Timothy, I'm curious if you could elaborate on what the "Sushi Magic" is, not that it sounds like anything I'd want but just to satisfy my curiosity.

I discovered that using the makisu (bamboo mat) was very easy, particularly when you understand how to position the rice on the nori (seaweed sheet), where to position the nori on the mat, where to position the filling on the rice, and how much to get the right size roll. Also curious if you see any advantage to toasting the nori. (I think I tried it both ways but forgot my results.)

There's something that has always bothered me about traditional rolls as served in restaurants. I've always felt that the slices were too big, and that I'd prefer a smaller bite size because I always feel the commercial rolls are too large, yet it makes a mess if you try to eat a slice in two bites. Has anybody else encountered this? I prefer to make my rolls smaller diameter than restaurant or sushi bar size, then slice them a bit thinner too so as to make more pieces and each of them smaller.

I found it interesting to have a few sushi presses in various sizes, for making square rolls, particularly if you're doing inside-out stuff, although I've preferred traditional rolls with nori outside.

I've never had good results making nigiri, appearance wise although they tasted good. I had a bit of a problem with them falling apart and this is a good reason that I should try the Kagayaki rice. One thing for sure, if you have the wrong rice it won't work at all.

By the way, I'm pleased that I had another original thought that turned out others had thought of too independently. One time I was making rolls and tempura at the same time, and I tempura fried a few roll slices! As it turned out it wasn't a bad idea at all! In fact was kind of interesting and I had thought, unique, but alas I've seen that my local sushi place in my new location has that on the menu, tempura fried some sort of roll. I bet you've had that somewhere too. When I did it I had thought it was very unconventional and non-traditional. I have no way of knowing if they ever do this in Japan but they do it in L.A. for sure.
__________________
Greg Who Cooks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 02:20 AM   #8
Sous Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 985
I completely agree that the pieces in restaurants are way too big. When I lived in LA I got pretty darn good at biting pieces of sushi in half without making too big of a mess. You should be able to put the whole thing in your mouth, but it's too big to enjoy, and savor that way. I would love to make my own sushi at home, but I'm afraid the raw fish would gross me out lol. I love sashimi, and sushi but I think I need someone else to prepare it so I can just enjoy the finished result.
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 09:55 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,157
When I was in Japan the size of the rolls were always one bite size. I prefer that over the over sized rolls I get here in the US.
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2011, 11:10 AM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Timothy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: St. Augustine, Florida
Posts: 2,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
I completely agree that the pieces in restaurants are way too big. When I lived in LA I got pretty darn good at biting pieces of sushi in half without making too big of a mess. You should be able to put the whole thing in your mouth, but it's too big to enjoy, and savor that way. I would love to make my own sushi at home, but I'm afraid the raw fish would gross me out lol. I love sashimi, and sushi but I think I need someone else to prepare it so I can just enjoy the finished result.
Quote:
Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
When I was in Japan the size of the rolls were always one bite size. I prefer that over the over sized rolls I get here in the US.
The shame of it is that the chefs are taught to make them over-sized for Americans. Everything in America has a "Super-size" or AYCE, and sushi schools are following suit.

Part of a Sushi Chef's job is to look at each of his customers and size the bites to the customers mouth. It doesn't seem to be much of a consideration any more. I've gotten bites that *Had* to be cut to eat. When I run into that, I ask the chef himself for a knife to enable cutting of his improperly sized sushi. They usually get the point and stop making mine so darn big.

Skittle, making sushi is easy. All it takes is practice. mise en place is the key to making sushi. I have about 20 small white bowls I use for sushi making. Each ingredient goes into its own bowl.

Using a Sushi Press will help you a lot in making pretty sushi.



It's almost impossible to go wrong when using a press.

Having a good quality sushi knife is important. also, it has to be very, very sharp.

When trying to cut a roll with a dull knife, it'll just make a mess and frustrate you.
__________________

__________________
Confirmed Sushi Addict
Timothy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
sushi

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.