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Old 07-03-2015, 08:58 AM   #11
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This book - http://www.amazon.com/Great-British-...tish+cook+book - looks promising.

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Old 07-03-2015, 08:59 AM   #12
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This book - Great British Cooking: A Well-kept Secret: Jane Garmey: 9780060974596: Amazon.com: Books - looks promising.

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Old 07-03-2015, 09:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
I don't blame them - I'd take Italian cuisine over any other cuisine anytime!!

There are a number of old (politically incorrect) jokes about heaven and hell that end with "Hell is Where The British are the chefs".

I've done some traveling in Europe, and I noted the lack of availability of a lot of food items in some countries, particularly some fruits and vegetables. I haven't been to the UK, but I suspect that the historic lack of availability of a variety of foods contributes to the stereotype. We're certainly spoiled here in the US, where we have almost every kind of food readily available year round. Except lamb, which is very expensive as compared to beef and pork.
When I graduated from high school, my mom gave me a trip to Europe - 15 countries in 30 days and England was last. The food was definitely not as good as the Danish, Dutch, German, Swiss, Italian, French, Austrian, etc., we had first. And warm beer... omg and not in a good way.

Maybe it's improved in the last 30 years.
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Old 07-03-2015, 10:04 AM   #14
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Today, isn't British food a result of influences from the colonial days? With a tremendous leaning toward Indian cuisine?
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Old 07-03-2015, 10:36 AM   #15
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Check out Keith Floyd episodes on Youtube.
He did quite a few in and around Britain.
Very informative.
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Old 07-03-2015, 10:38 AM   #16
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It's my understanding that Delia Smith is one of the more renowned British cookbook authors on the topic. You might want to try one of her books or blogs for a start.
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Old 07-03-2015, 01:12 PM   #17
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Quote:
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When I graduated from high school, my mom gave me a trip to Europe - 15 countries in 30 days and England was last. The food was definitely not as good as the Danish, Dutch, German, Swiss, Italian, French, Austrian, etc., we had first. And warm beer... omg and not in a good way.

Maybe it's improved in the last 30 years.
There is no maybe about it GG, YES it has! Remarkably so!!! Chilled beer is the norm and food standards have come on in leaps and bounds. 30 years ago is a VERY long time ago isn't it??
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Old 07-03-2015, 01:31 PM   #18
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There is no maybe about it GG, YES it has! Remarkably so!!! Chilled beer is the norm and food standards have come on in leaps and bounds. 30 years ago is a VERY long time ago isn't it??
I wonder if that period was an aberration. Some of the stuff we really enjoy in British and Irish pubs nowadays is traditional food, like shepherd's pie, bangers and mash, steak and kidney pie, fish and chips, etc.

I seem to remember that we used to use a lot of canned or overcooked vegis on this side of the pond in that era. I'll bet those traditional dishes taste better with fresh ingredients and that is part of the reason that they taste better now.
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Old 07-03-2015, 03:29 PM   #19
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The entire social dynamic of British food was molded having to fight off the Germans in two world wars.
You can't blame them for having their focus on 'other things' during that period.
The French of course surrendered and half of France became German allies within days of being attacked in both wars. Maybe their 'focus' was French sauces.
I always winch when I see a 'white' tablecloth in a French restaurant.
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Old 07-03-2015, 04:10 PM   #20
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It's just not my favorite cuisine. I like highly seasoned foods and that's not a characteristic of traditional British food of any era, as far as I can tell. Modern tastes for curry, fresh vegetables and herbs that don't grow in that climate, etc., are not part of traditional British cooking, which is what I thought the OP was referring to.
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