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Old 08-01-2015, 12:05 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
Andy gave you good advice.

I'm with the simple coating. For me it dredge the chicken in flour,and S&P. That's it.

I can only add....

Don't overcrowd the fryer.

Let the coated chicken sit for about 1/2 an hour before frying. It helps the coating stick.

Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
When using a bounded coating, the meat has to be dry before dredging in flour. I dry the pieces and then put them in the fridge for about 30 minutes to get them even drier. If the egg is too thick, it will make the coating cook inconsistently. I add water or oil to the egg wash. I always put the larger pieces in first (2-3 pieces), remove those after about 25 minutes. Do the smaller pieces. I then will remove the larger pieces to the fryer to reheat them for about 5-7 minutes.
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Old 08-01-2015, 12:21 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Electric deep fryers are limited by capacity and the amount of current available in a kitchen outlet so can't recover as fast as a pot on a stove top burner.
I am curious about this statement?
What does available current have to do with recovery time?
The appliance can only use/consume, the power/wattage required to operate it.

The receptacle is only a pathway for current to flow. It has no ability to increase the wattage required to heat the oil. It only provides a path for the power consumed by the appliance.
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Old 08-01-2015, 12:34 PM   #13
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Most household outlets are protected by a 15 amp fuse/circuit breaker. That limits how much current any appliance can draw. (15 amps x 120 volts = 1800 watts max.) Most small electric appliances have a maximum of 1500-1800 watt capacity. This limits how much heat energy the fryer's heater coils can generate and, consequently, how fast the oil temperature can be raised. An electric fryer is rated at 1500-1800 watts because of the current available in homes.

If household current was at 240 volts as it is in Europe, deep fryers could have higher wattage ratings and heat up faster.

If you have an electric stove, you may know it has a special 240 volt line to provide enough current to heat four burners, an oven and a broiler.
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Old 08-02-2015, 12:19 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Most household outlets are protected by a 15 amp fuse/circuit breaker. That limits how much current any appliance can draw. (15 amps x 120 volts = 1800 watts max.) Most small electric appliances have a maximum of 1500-1800 watt capacity. This limits how much heat energy the fryer's heater coils can generate and, consequently, how fast the oil temperature can be raised. An electric fryer is rated at 1500-1800 watts because of the current available in homes.

If household current was at 240 volts as it is in Europe, deep fryers could have higher wattage ratings and heat up faster.

If you have an electric stove, you may know it has a special 240 volt line to provide enough current to heat four burners, an oven and a broiler.

I think we can agree completely with your statement.
My only point is watts do all the work. Watts = Work.
A 120 volt fryer rated at 1800 watts and a 240 volt fryer rated at 1800 watts both use 1800 watts.
There will be no difference in heat or work performed.
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Old 08-02-2015, 12:59 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I think we can agree completely with your statement.
My only point is watts do all the work. Watts = Work.
A 120 volt fryer rated at 1800 watts and a 240 volt fryer rated at 1800 watts both use 1800 watts.
There will be no difference in heat or work performed.

Yes, but if you have a 240 volt service, with a 15 amp fuse, you would have 3600 watts available. If you are a small appliance manufacturer for a 240 volt market, you could make a deep fryer rated at more than 1800 watts.
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Old 08-02-2015, 01:00 PM   #16
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Yes, but if you have a 240 volt service, with a 15 amp fuse, you would have 3600 watts available. If you are a small appliance manufacturer for a 240 volt market, you could make a deep fryer rated at more than 1800 watts.

My original point was that a pot of oil on a stove top has more energy alailable to heat the oil.
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Old 08-02-2015, 02:07 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
My original point was that a pot of oil on a stove top has more energy alailable to heat the oil.
How many watts is an 18,000 BTU burner on a gas range? j/k
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Old 08-02-2015, 02:22 PM   #18
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How many watts is an 18,000 BTU burner on a gas range? j/k
From Convert Btu per hour to watt - Conversion of Measurement Units "The SI derived unit for power is the watt.
1 Btu per hour is equal to 0.29307107 watt."

18,000 BTU/hr = 5275 watts.
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Old 08-02-2015, 03:04 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
From Convert Btu per hour to watt - Conversion of Measurement Units "The SI derived unit for power is the watt.
1 Btu per hour is equal to 0.29307107 watt."

18,000 BTU/hr = 5275 watts.
Cool beans! 😎 Good to know.
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Old 08-02-2015, 06:47 PM   #20
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That was supposed to be joke....
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