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Old 06-06-2006, 01:32 PM   #11
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I don't think Escoffier is practical for modern cooks and kitchens, but second the recommendations for Julia and "Beautiful". If you are young and just learning, you need a cookbook that is geared to our modern grocery stores. Don't get me wrong, I own Escoffier and Larousse. I just find them better for entertaining reading rather than actual cooking. The companion cookbook for the last PBS series that Jacques and Julia did together is a very practical, very useful book. I guess I'd call it semi-French, but I find myself referring back to it a lot more than my other books! Make used book stores and yard sales your best friend. You can find a lot at them, for very little.
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Old 06-08-2006, 12:16 PM   #12
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Sounds great! Sorry I don't have a reccomendation though. I just love French food from resturaunts though, and I know I could never put those peices together like they do because I'm not an artist.
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Old 06-08-2006, 12:36 PM   #13
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Use your library as a resource if you can't afford a lot of these rather pricey books! They usually have a wealth of great cookbooks and classics, or can get them on loan from another branch in your town.
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Old 06-08-2006, 12:47 PM   #14
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Actually, while Julia Child's The Way To Cook book is one of my kitchen bibles, it's definitely not classic French cooking, but more of a basic cookbook.
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Old 06-08-2006, 01:37 PM   #15
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I would also suggest
Barefoot in Paris by Ina Garten

I purchased this book last year and I think the recipes are fantastic and not overly complicated
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Old 06-08-2006, 01:54 PM   #16
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I may get that also!


~Corey123.
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Old 06-08-2006, 01:57 PM   #17
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I seem to recall that the OP is British, and as I assume that the books mentioned are mostly American (not Escoffier, of course) I think that if the recipes are all written in US measurements (cup etc), it would be very time consuming to convert every single recipe to European measurements!

Raymond Blanc, Jean Cristoph Novelli and other French chefs have written British style recipe books and would be great books to start looking at modern French cuisine.
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Old 06-08-2006, 09:02 PM   #18
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Good lookin' out, Ishbel! It never dawned on me to look and see where the OP was from! My bad!
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Old 06-09-2006, 03:33 AM   #19
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I find that so many of the delicious recipes posted here can be a real chore to 're-jig' into metric or Imperial measurements - and I'm sure that European recipes must cause the same problems for American members.

I suspect that is why people like Julia Childs etc have never gained a wide audience in the UK. We hold Elizabeth David in the same reverence as JC seems to have from Americans. I remember my mother buying Elizabeth David cookbooks in the 50s... A revelation in cookery terms, introducing French and Italian cookery to a post-war generation of eager housewives.
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Old 07-04-2006, 05:24 PM   #20
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French - Delicious Classic Cuisine (Paperback)
by Carole Clements, Elizabeth Wolf-Cohen

You might have to search around to find a copy -- I got my last copy (a gift for someone else) used via Amazon. It's a fantastic, reasonably priced, clear, beautifully illustrated, and not at all complicated book with things that you can make from any supermarket...excellent book with very authentic recipes.
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